U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Europe
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-12-2016, 03:48 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
3,750 posts, read 3,857,018 times
Reputation: 3565

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
The benefit would be that they wouldn't have to continue to subsidize it and spend money shipping supplies of various sorts in.
Kaliningrad is being kept economically isolated by design from Putin (old Soviet doctrine that still remains in place), that is why it receives special subsidies from Moscow. It is not an inherently economically depressive region. It is being kept as a special military district and not as a EU-Russia economic hub.

In my opinion, Kaliningrad would open up only after Putin leaves (2024?) and the new government in Kremlin would prioritize the economy over military strategy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-12-2016, 03:58 AM
 
Location: Australia
247 posts, read 295,255 times
Reputation: 356
It looks like a nice place


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PnwNOtG06Dg
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2016, 10:40 AM
 
1,830 posts, read 1,224,202 times
Reputation: 839
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gantz View Post
Kaliningrad is being kept economically isolated by design from Putin (old Soviet doctrine that still remains in place), that is why it receives special subsidies from Moscow. It is not an inherently economically depressive region. It is being kept as a special military district and not as a EU-Russia economic hub.

In my opinion, Kaliningrad would open up only after Putin leaves (2024?) and the new government in Kremlin would prioritize the economy over military strategy.
Broadly agree. Posted this a few pages back. It's likely related to the NATO deployments in southern and eastern Europe.

http://www.city-data.com/forum/46462833-post48.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2016, 11:01 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,831 posts, read 70,665,916 times
Reputation: 76799
Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
Doesn't Lithuania already have knowing Lithuanian as a prerequisite to citizenship which is why a lot of older Russian people don't have citizenship since they don't speak Lithuanian proficiently?
Yes, that was my point. A lot of Russians left Latvia and Lithuania rather than live somewhere, where they wouldn't have citizenship. (Nothing was stopping them from learning the language; there were classes available.) Sorry, I guess I wasn't clear; when I said the language policy "worked out well", I meant it was effective in clearing much of the Russian population out of there. (Since someone said K. would have too many Russians in it for Lith. to want it.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2016, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Finland
24,268 posts, read 18,809,305 times
Reputation: 11103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Yes, that was my point. A lot of Russians left Latvia and Lithuania rather than live somewhere, where they wouldn't have citizenship. (Nothing was stopping them from learning the language; there were classes available.) Sorry, I guess I wasn't clear; when I said the language policy "worked out well", I meant it was effective in clearing much of the Russian population out of there. (Since someone said K. would have too many Russians in it for Lith. to want it.)
No. Est, Lat, Lit had all a quite small Russian minority when they declared independence in 1918. Most of the Russians moved in after 1945, and as they came in such large numbers and thought that the USSR would be eternal, they never learnt the native language as the native population was required to learn Russian anyway. But still today, cities like Narva in Estonia and Daugavpils in Latvia are close to 90% Russian speaking.
Lithuanian SSR didn't attract that many Russians for some reason, they hoped that the USSR wouldn't be eternal, and they rejected the annexation of Königsberg Kreis so that they wouldn't have to deal with a large Russian minority. Today Estonia and Latvia are 20-25% ethnic Russian, while Lithuania is 5%.

What comes to passports, it is against all UN human rights that Estonia and Latvia have a large number of people who are stateless. Of course they have been independent for 26 years the Russians could've learnt the language, but keeping these people stateless is unacceptable. The old babushka born in Ulan-Ude in 1930 and now residing in Jurmala isn't learning Latvian anyway. She has a picture of Lenin and Stalin on her wall, and probably doesn't even know what's happening in Latvia, as she watches only Russian television.

The Estonians and Latvians are just too bitter, rightfully emotionally hurt and Russophobic that they won't give citizenship. And equally importantly: to ban them from voting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-15-2016, 12:25 PM
 
502 posts, read 315,335 times
Reputation: 666
Quote:
Originally Posted by FightForFreedom View Post
Kaliningrad is a mass of land in Europe that is a Russian Oblast.



Why is this good? Greatly eliminates tension from leaving & entering Russia. (Aka Kaliningrad) and people traveling the Baltic states.
No worries, "tension" will be gone soon, once Russian Empire acquires Baltic states and Belarus.
It will happen overnight, watch the news.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-15-2016, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Finland
24,268 posts, read 18,809,305 times
Reputation: 11103
Quote:
Originally Posted by civis View Post
No worries, "tension" will be gone soon, once Russian Empire acquires Baltic states and Belarus.
It will happen overnight, watch the news.
xaxaxa.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-15-2016, 06:12 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,831 posts, read 70,665,916 times
Reputation: 76799
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariete View Post
No. Est, Lat, Lit had all a quite small Russian minority when they declared independence in 1918. Most of the Russians moved in after 1945, and as they came in such large numbers and thought that the USSR would be eternal, they never learnt the native language as the native population was required to learn Russian anyway. But still today, cities like Narva in Estonia and Daugavpils in Latvia are close to 90% Russian speaking.
Lithuanian SSR didn't attract that many Russians for some reason, they hoped that the USSR wouldn't be eternal, and they rejected the annexation of Königsberg Kreis so that they wouldn't have to deal with a large Russian minority. Today Estonia and Latvia are 20-25% ethnic Russian, while Lithuania is 5%.

What comes to passports, it is against all UN human rights that Estonia and Latvia have a large number of people who are stateless. Of course they have been independent for 26 years the Russians could've learnt the language, but keeping these people stateless is unacceptable. The old babushka born in Ulan-Ude in 1930 and now residing in Jurmala isn't learning Latvian anyway. She has a picture of Lenin and Stalin on her wall, and probably doesn't even know what's happening in Latvia, as she watches only Russian television.

The Estonians and Latvians are just too bitter, rightfully emotionally hurt and Russophobic that they won't give citizenship. And equally importantly: to ban them from voting.
I was talking about the transition after the Baltics regained independence in the early 90's. Lat had a Russ population that was 34% of the whole. That shrank to 26%, after language requirements were imposed for citizenship. Lithuania's total Russian population now is only 6%.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-15-2016, 06:13 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,831 posts, read 70,665,916 times
Reputation: 76799
Quote:
Originally Posted by civis View Post
No worries, "tension" will be gone soon, once Russian Empire acquires Baltic states and Belarus.
It will happen overnight, watch the news.
They don't really have to acquire Belarus; it's already in their pocket.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2016, 05:45 AM
 
Location: france
693 posts, read 384,972 times
Reputation: 650
Sometimes ago, I heard about an independantist movement in Kaliningrad who has been put down by Moscow.
How the things evolute there? Is there still a support for independance?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Europe
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top