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Old 03-03-2015, 09:13 AM
 
4,994 posts, read 5,071,382 times
Reputation: 6336

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lchoro View Post
Russia is no longer the Soviet Union.
Yes, Russia is a budding semi fascist dictatorship working hard to remove prefix "semi". Russia is more sick than later days USSR but it is not as wicked as Stalinist USSR, not yet. Big question is why lefty "alternative" crowd love and shill for the Russian imperial fascism? Any marginally rational ideas?
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Old 03-03-2015, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Russia
4,228 posts, read 2,370,834 times
Reputation: 1236
Positive(!) song from RABFAQ (Song about new spring)

говорят, что есть страны сплошного тепла
там от зим отдыхают мозги и тела
но не может жара быть важнее любви
значит там где ты свой, там борись и живи

Someone says that there are countries continuous heat
there brains and body rest from winter
but the heat can not be more important than love
So wherever you think your home, there live and fight


http://youtu.be/E1Abrc6KM1s
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Old 03-03-2015, 09:19 AM
 
4,994 posts, read 5,071,382 times
Reputation: 6336
Quote:
Originally Posted by DPolo View Post
Putin has been running an efficient government and Ukraine can't get it's act together.
And yet flaming Russian nazis prefer to view all that magic efficiency from NYC, given a chance. Kleptocratic dictatorships are very efficient at stealing, accumulating the loot and turning people into dumb, speechless cattle that can be manipulated and pacified using a few simple tricks.
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Old 03-03-2015, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Russia
4,228 posts, read 2,370,834 times
Reputation: 1236
Quote:
Originally Posted by travric View Post
Ideally France should give him his money back.
Ideally for you or for French?
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Old 03-03-2015, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Greater NYC, USA
2,760 posts, read 2,768,602 times
Reputation: 1717
Quote:
Originally Posted by RememberMee View Post
And yet flaming Russian nazis prefer to view all that magic efficiency from NYC, given a chance. Kleptocratic dictatorships are very efficient at stealing, accumulating the loot and turning people into dumb, speechless cattle that can be manipulated and pacified using a few simple tricks.
I see my US government doing this very efficiently, and no matter what president I elect this does not change...

This actually can be said about any government in question.
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Old 03-03-2015, 09:57 AM
 
4,456 posts, read 3,710,742 times
Reputation: 3109
Re: 'Ideally for you or for French?'

Well really I figured it would have been better if the French spent their time building some nice cruise ships. Better to have'em going down the Volga taking in the scenery than holding stuff to rain destruction down in SE Ukraine or wherever the flavor of 'annexation' takes'em......;-)....
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Old 03-03-2015, 10:03 AM
 
4,994 posts, read 5,071,382 times
Reputation: 6336
Quote:
Originally Posted by DPolo View Post
I see my US government doing this very efficiently, and no matter what president I elect this does not change...

This actually can be said about any government in question.
Sure, comrade, all around the world the Fuhrer and a close circle of his trusted FSB henchmen appropriate all the power and most of the country' wealth in less than 20 years, while creating a truly feudal power pyramid where Kremlin junta rewards state officials (from big to small) with appropriate to their power stations licenses to steal. Btw, muscovite tsars had a governance system like that too.

Neo-Feudalism Explained - The American Interest
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Old 03-03-2015, 10:21 AM
 
2,032 posts, read 2,418,841 times
Reputation: 1499
Since Putin came to power in January 2000, at least twenty-three journalists have been murdered in Russia for their investigative reporting on government malfeasance, along with several anti-Kremlin political activists. In only two of these cases have there been convictions for the murders. The story is always the same: prosecutors go through the motions of conducting an investigation and sometimes make a few arrests. There may even be a trial or two, as with the Anna Politkovskaya case. But the people who ordered the killing are never identified. Consider the following, partial list of such murders that have occurred under Putin’s watch, beginning with his appointment in 1998 as head of the FSB:

November 1998: Duma Deputy Galina Starovoitova, a human rights activist and an outspoken critic of the Kremlin, shot to death in her St. Petersburg apartment building.

July 2000: Igor Domnikov, reporter for the independent newspaper Novaya Gazeta who wrote about government corruption, dies in Moscow two months after being severely beaten.

April 2003: Sergei Yushenkov, Duma deputy and co-chairman of the Liberal Russia party, gunned down at the entrance to his apartment building. Yushenkov was serving at the time as co-chairman of the so-called Kovalev Commission, which was investigating the 1999 apartment bombings in Russia and the Kremlin’s possible role.

July 2003: Novaya Gazeta reporter Iuri Shchekochikhin, investigating at the time high-level corruption in the law enforcement agencies, dies from what is believed to have been poisoning with Thallium. Shchekochikhin was also a member of the Kovalev Commission.

July 2004: Paul Klebnikov, American editor of Forbes Russia, shot to death in Moscow. He was investigating organized crime and its connections with the Russian government.

September 2006: Andrei Kozlov, first deputy chairman of Russia’s Central Bank, who was, among other reforms, trying to put a stop to money-laundering, shot dead on a Moscow street.

October 2006: Novaya Gazeta reporter Anna Politkovskaya, known for her opposition to the second war in Chechnya and President Putin, gunned down in the stairwell of her apartment building. Although police eventually arrested and convicted five of participating in and carrying out the killing, the mastermind was never identified.

November 2006: Former FSB officer Alexander Litvinenko, an outspoken critic of Putin, who had been granted asylum in Britain, poisoned by polonium-210, a highly lethal and very rare substance, which the killers inadvertently spread all over London.

November 2006: Maksim Maksimov, investigative reporter for the St. Petersburg weekly Gorod, declared dead on
November 30, 2006, two years after he was reported missing. At the time he went missing he was investigating the unsolved 1998 murder in St. Petersburg of Galina Starovoitova.

March 2007: Ivan Safronov, apparently pushed to his death from his Moscow apartment window. A respected correspondent for Kommersant, Safronov was investigating a secret sale of Russian missiles and fighter jets to Syria and Iran.

October 2008: Prominent lawyer Karina Moskalenko, who pursues cases in international courts against the Russian government for human rights abuses and has also represented the family of Anna Politkovskaya, was poisoned by mercury placed in her car but survived.

January 2009: Russian human rights lawyer Stanislav Markelov shot and killed on a Moscow Street, along with a reporter for Novaya Gazeta, Anastasia Barburova.

July 2009: Natalya Estemirova, human rights activist and contributor to Novaya Gazeta, shot dead near the capital of Chechnya, Grozny. She reported on extra-judicial killings, abductions, and torture in Chechnya by federal and local authorities.

November 2009: Sergei Magnitsky, a Russian accountant who had made allegations about large-scale theft in the government, died while languishing ill in prison after being arrested on false charges.

April 2013: Mikhail Beketov, died from apparent complications arising from a November 2008 attack by unknown assailants that crushed his skull and left him in a coma for months. Beketov was a journalist who reported on government corruption involving the highly controversial construction of a highway through the Khimki Forest, near Moscow.
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Old 03-03-2015, 10:26 AM
 
2,032 posts, read 2,418,841 times
Reputation: 1499
Tragic coincidences, no doubt.
I'd like to see a list of Putin/United Russia supporters who have met similar unpleasant circumstances.
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Old 03-03-2015, 10:32 AM
 
5,785 posts, read 2,334,104 times
Reputation: 6022
Quote:
Does Ukraine even have a future? not in Putin has anything to do with it it dosent.
Ukraine is one of those countries (like Iraq) where a bunch of ignorant arses drew a line on a map without consideration of the ethnicity of the people within those borders. It's debatable whether it will remain a single national entity into the future. Ukraines economy is in shambles largely because of the stance of the ruling junta. 30 to 40% of their economy depended on Russia.
They grow a lot of tomatoes in Ukraine, they sold those tomatoes to Russian citizens, not Europeans. Motor Sich, Antonov Kraz and the huge machine works in Kharkov were supplying Russia with all kinds of stuff. Who in the west is going to buy goods from Ukrainian industries? Some actually do but the numbers in imports/exports pale in comparison to it's trade with Russia.
Cold hard right hook to the head is the future of Ukraine is at best bleak. The juntas leadership are disgusting, getting that IMF loan is more important than their aged population who it seems for all intents and purposes are to be left impoverished in some old apartment to die.
Economic cooperation is only natural between Russia and Ukraine, it's simply what works best. If a farmer in Odessa has to let a field of tomatoes rot in the sun because of sanctions on Russia or whatever and the Europeans won't buy them where is the farmer going to make a living? If the technicians at Motor Sich have no aircraft engines to build how will they feed their families?

Maybe they'll move to Russia where they can get a job.

Putin wants a bridge in Ukraine and he is correct. The west? They want a banana republic, servile with an easily manageable/desperate population and lots of profit going out of the country.
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