U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Europe
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-14-2014, 07:13 PM
 
Location: East coast
613 posts, read 892,280 times
Reputation: 306

Advertisements

I heard it is more of a thing for the Irish-American diaspora (I go to the grocery store and see decorations in green and of course symbols like clovers and leprechauns here in the northeast US where I live, and of course there are the parades) than in Ireland itself.

But how do the Irish themselves see or celebrate it?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-14-2014, 10:13 PM
Status: "Stand with Hong Kong" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Laguna Niguel, Orange County CA
9,809 posts, read 7,701,113 times
Reputation: 7809
It is gaining some popularity but is not yet a major event.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2014, 06:41 AM
 
2,646 posts, read 4,064,119 times
Reputation: 2447
It is only in the last 10 years that Dublin has a big parade. St Patrick's Day in Ireland used to be very low key. People would go to church in the morning and have a dinner afterwards.

St Patrick's Day and Halloween while originally Irish culture have spread to a lot of countries through the US. It's quite strange when you think about it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2014, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Bay Area
3,928 posts, read 7,736,353 times
Reputation: 4490
In small towns/villages there might be a small parade of locals, then everyone heads to the pub. Some of the older folks celebrate mass prior. The fanfare in the US is definitely a bigger deal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2014, 11:44 AM
 
Location: God's Gift to Mankind for flying anything
5,326 posts, read 11,043,599 times
Reputation: 4146
In the USA, if there is no money to be made from those events, it would die out quickly ?

Like many other *events* such as this, it is mostly a commercial endeavor ?

From the comments above, it seems that in the *old days* it was more or less a *Family Affair* ?

<<<St Patrick's Day in Ireland used to be very low key. People would go to church in the morning and have a dinner afterwards.>>>
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2014, 02:50 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
20,695 posts, read 19,505,116 times
Reputation: 3107
Its not celebrated here. I really don't care tbh.

I'm just glad to be getting a bank holiday off.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2014, 02:51 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
20,695 posts, read 19,505,116 times
Reputation: 3107
Quote:
Originally Posted by clongirl View Post
In small towns/villages there might be a small parade of locals, then everyone heads to the pub. Some of the older folks celebrate mass prior. The fanfare in the US is definitely a bigger deal.
And I really have no idea why. America is not Ireland.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2014, 04:05 PM
 
Location: West Los Angeles
9,986 posts, read 9,817,059 times
Reputation: 9891
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac15 View Post
And I really have no idea why. America is not Ireland.
But many of us have Irish blood. Furthermore, I have immense respect for St. Patrick doing battle with the figurative "snakes" he forced out of Ireland who were stealing from and corrupting the native Irish populace. And we certainly need a great deal of that here in the U.S.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2014, 04:16 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
20,695 posts, read 19,505,116 times
Reputation: 3107
But you are American. Not Irish.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2014, 05:39 PM
 
4,683 posts, read 3,610,867 times
Reputation: 7381
Not just the fact that America is NOT Ireland, but many Irish Americans, certainly around Boston, also still cling to very provincial and small minded mentality, which is not particularly consistent with American tolerance and values.

I dont really care about it. Not only am I not Irish, but I usually associate the big parades in South Boston with drunken crowds and very uncivilized behavior. Why anyone would bring their kids to see people vomit green beer on the streets is beyond me. Grotesque.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Europe
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top