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Old 11-10-2009, 08:28 PM
 
176 posts, read 309,440 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aqua0 View Post
Denmark. Everybody speaks English, it's clean, it's fun, and people have a nice attitude and are friendly. It's cold, but it's made up of a bunch of islands and you are always near the water. It's on the expensive side, but the nice people more than make up for it.

Danish is so hard to learn and pronounce that nobody there wants you to bother with it.
Denmark is a nice country. Though the Danish language isn't THAT hard to learn. It's hell to pronounce but it's not that hard to learn. It's quite close to english, not as close as swedish but still it's much easier to learn than Finnish, Polish and so on.
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Old 11-11-2009, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Anchorage, Alaska (most of the time)
1,163 posts, read 2,318,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I Amuse Myself View Post
Denmark is a nice country. Though the Danish language isn't THAT hard to learn. It's hell to pronounce but it's not that hard to learn. It's quite close to english, not as close as swedish but still it's much easier to learn than Finnish, Polish and so on.
What makes Swedish closer to English than Danish is? Same tree, and Swedish and Danish (and Norweigan) are on the same branch. Besides, listen to Danes speaking - they use English loan words (not even re-made to sound Danish) often, and a lot more often than Swedish.
Finnish and Polish aren't German languages, so they will be harder to learn than other German languages (e.g. German, Danish, Swedish, Norweigan) for an English-speaking.

I can't give advice on what "European country is the best to move to", since I don't know what the OP considers "best". Some hints as to the definition isn't quite enough for me, I'm afraid Plus, I'm biased. I'm going to go with either Sweden or England. Maybe France.
I think they're great. How about you?
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Old 11-11-2009, 08:54 AM
 
176 posts, read 309,440 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweden View Post
What makes Swedish closer to English than Danish is? Same tree, and Swedish and Danish (and Norweigan) are on the same branch. Besides, listen to Danes speaking - they use English loan words (not even re-made to sound Danish) often, and a lot more often than Swedish.
Finnish and Polish aren't German languages, so they will be harder to learn than other German languages (e.g. German, Danish, Swedish, Norweigan) for an English-speaking.

I can't give advice on what "European country is the best to move to", since I don't know what the OP considers "best". Some hints as to the definition isn't quite enough for me, I'm afraid Plus, I'm biased. I'm going to go with either Sweden or England. Maybe France.
I think they're great. How about you?
Swedish words are much closer to english than danish is.

Danish is different from Swedish, which is the closest european language to English. So it's easier to learn swedish, as it's easier for a swede to learn Norwegian than danish.

English -> Swedish -> Norwegian -> Danish.

Swedish beeing the closest, danish further away.
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Old 11-12-2009, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Anchorage, Alaska (most of the time)
1,163 posts, read 2,318,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I Amuse Myself View Post
Swedish words are much closer to english than danish is.

Danish is different from Swedish, which is the closest european language to English. So it's easier to learn swedish, as it's easier for a swede to learn Norwegian than danish.

English -> Swedish -> Norwegian -> Danish.

Swedish beeing the closest, danish further away.
Well, you're going to have to show some links to that info, because I have studied linguistics, with primary focus on Nordic languages, and any such correlation has never been implied. It's wrong. Sounds good and easy. But wrong.

And the reason it's easier for a Swede to learn Norweigan than Danish, and also for a Dane to learn Norweigan easier than Swedish, is because Norweigan is more of a mixture of all Scandinavian languages and dialects, whereas Swedish and Danish are separate from each other (not much influence on each other, hence not that much in common).
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Old 11-12-2009, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Israel, The Internet Clouds
2 posts, read 7,991 times
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eds
Quote:
Originally Posted by charolastra00 View Post
I love the UK- ... including the diversity and great culture that immigration has brought.
I guess this true to London and other big cities, and less so to small towns.
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Old 11-17-2009, 01:18 PM
 
Location: between Ath,GR & Mia,FL...
2,574 posts, read 593,165 times
Reputation: 327
England,preferably London...
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Old 11-22-2009, 12:08 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico
2,118 posts, read 2,310,145 times
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My friend is Norwegian and she can communicate with anyone from Sweeden, Denmark, etc..

Like what many other people said, the OP wouldn't like it in Europe (and people wouldn't like him) based on his attitude. I'll still reply to the post though..

England, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland all speak english, obviously. Most people in the Netherlands speak great English (German and French too). Individuals in Norway, Sweeden, Finland, and Denmark have a good command of English as well (not sure about Iceland). Individuals in France and German speak English as well, although not so good and not so many people. Fewer people in Belgium speak english than in Germany and France. All other countries come last as far as second language English speaking countries.

For some reason I have found that a lot of people don't like France, but I have found France as a country and the people to be quite nice. Contrary to popular belief, people in Paris aren't that rude or arrogant.. it's like any other major city.. especially one with so many tourists. The south of France is really nice as well, laid back nice people (that goes for any place nearest the sea).

The Netherlands is a really good country. Amsterdam is filled with Brits. Other than that, there isn't really any other city in the Netherlands that is "touristy". I live in Maastricht and it's mainly an international town/city. Big international university here (a lot of Germans). It's also near the border to Germany and Belgium. Pretty small-knit community here, as far as the international students go.

England is great. Most English people I have met (my girl friend is English) are receptive and nice to Americans.

Ireland is amazing. Everytime I visit Ireland the people always say how "awesome" my accent is. People in Ireland are laid back and really friendly. People are even more friendly when they drink. Actually, people in Ireland are the most friendly I've met.

Wales is amazing as well, second best place for 'friendly' people.

Scandanavian people are very very nice as well.. really friendly and outgoing. Scandanavian people are also all amazingly beautiful. Some Norwegians I work with mention how coming to Holland they have felt the lack of beautiful women. Strange to me, since I think a lot of women in Holland are beautiful..

Anyways, most Europeans (Generally) are a lot more closed off than your general American.. so, uh.. i'm not sure what to tell you.
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Old 11-23-2009, 02:12 PM
 
176 posts, read 309,440 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweden View Post
Well, you're going to have to show some links to that info, because I have studied linguistics, with primary focus on Nordic languages, and any such correlation has never been implied. It's wrong. Sounds good and easy. But wrong.

And the reason it's easier for a Swede to learn Norweigan than Danish, and also for a Dane to learn Norweigan easier than Swedish, is because Norweigan is more of a mixture of all Scandinavian languages and dialects, whereas Swedish and Danish are separate from each other (not much influence on each other, hence not that much in common).
The reason i'm saying this is because I'm scandinavian, And speak fluently all scandinavian languages, including english and finnish?

Swedish is closer to english than Danish is, Because the danish words are ... "Rougher" than the swedish ones. The swedish ones are clean, not to mention it's easier for an english person to understand swedish text than danish, not to mention when they speak!

You're correct that Norwegian is a mix of all scandinavian languages. Swedish and danish have had alot of influence on eachother though, The wars and so on (Same as The swedish and finnish languages have influenced eachother). The reason danish is closer to norwegian, is because they influensed the norwegian language to a higher degree. Not to mention denmark did own norway for a very long time.

The english language have taken alot of words from the swedish one, thanks to the vikings that came from sweden.

Studies and books will teach you alot, but the one thing that teaches even more is Experience. Living in Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Norway have shown me alot. And working on a danish electrician team that gets sent out across the world to do work . I have seen first hand how people react and understand you, depending on which of the languages you speak. I also have several close friends from The Netherlands, That i have thaught swedish to and how things work in Scandinavia. The language they understood least was Finnish, After that suprisingly danish, then Norwegian and they could understand most of what i told them in Swedish.

[Edited] : This is what i have been thaught, seen and experienced. Speaking the languages in question also makes it easier for me to compare words, and see how people react when i speak them (I do speak fluently aswell, even danish) . But no, I haven't searched for any links to prove you wrong. This is as much common sense for me as subtration would be in mathematics.

If you do study languages (Which i don't doubt you do). Then you would know that one language can be influenced by several others, even though we might not notice it. Finnish is influenced by Russian, and swedish, as an example. Or the swedish language having been influenced by Finlands Svenska, English, French, Norwegian, Danish and german. This doesn't make it ground breaking, but you can find certain words that are taken from other languages, and this is indeed influecing. Just because something is in the same branch of the tree, doesn't mean that they are identical. And no offense to you, but you would be a fool if you think that an english person would understand the danish language spoken to them as well as they would the swedish. THIS is common sense.

Norway and Denmark share the same alphabet, Sweden doesn't. This is just one more reason that Danish and Norwegian are closer, And you can't think danish is the same as swedish.

[Final] : If you cut down a language into Speech and Text. And you would give each 50% value of the language.

Text wise, an english person would see a difference and understand Swedish a little bit easier, nothing ground breaking. But there is a difference.

Speech wise, an english person will understand swedish being spoken to him MUCH easier than if a dane spoke to him.

So in the end Swedish IS easier to understand, perhaps the difference is minimal when it comes to the text, or written part. But when it comes to speaking, you will notice it.

Last edited by I Amuse Myself; 11-23-2009 at 03:06 PM..
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Old 11-23-2009, 02:59 PM
 
3,826 posts, read 4,921,906 times
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You all talk about Europe's peoples, and how very nice and better than US citizens they are.
So far so good, I don't want to be judgmental (I'm an European myself), the OP and others obviously think "the grass is greener, etc."
Just one thing : except if you plan to live in Spain, Southern Italy, Greece and Portugal, don't expect to find a better weather in most of Europe than in the North/Central USA. I just wanted to make that point.
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Old 11-25-2009, 06:00 AM
 
Location: Lille, France
97 posts, read 110,379 times
Reputation: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tommodonahue View Post
I live in Maastricht and it's mainly an international town/city. Big international university here (a lot of Germans). It's also near the border to Germany and Belgium. Pretty small-knit community here, as far as the international students go.

I live in Lille, but I recently visited Maastrich and found it to be an amazing little city.

And I agree with you, I find the dutch women to be quite beautiful.
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