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Old 09-09-2010, 11:37 PM
 
Location: Brambleton, VA
2,187 posts, read 3,697,337 times
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Any tips? I have completed a few half marathons, and my friends are trying to encourage me to do a full marathon in January (I just completed my last half on Sunday) and although I have gotten used to running the half and been fairly successful with my pacing, I just can't imagine willingly doubling that amount of distance.

For my training, I stick with the Hal Higdon Novice programs and pair them with the Jeff Galloway Intervals - I tried 30 seconds of running then 30 seconds of walking last weekend and improved my last half marathon time by a half an hour!! I hit the wall at mile 10 because that was my longest recent run, so I now know that I need to go a little over the distance so that I don't in the future. The plan through Hal Higdon will work in time for the full marathon but the distance is just daunting to me.

How did you make the transition? Was it easy, did you end up getting any injuries? How did you keep the motivation up? Are you dependent on gels the entire time when I only needed Gu Chomps in the beginning and a gel at mile 9 to be okay? The race I am looking at is entirely flat (except for a couple small hills) so it wouldn't be in the same category as the Boston Marathon! Thankfully!

It just seems out of reach...but then again, I felt the same way before I completed my first half marathon so maybe I am just overthinking this?

TIA for any suggestions!
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Old 09-16-2010, 06:33 AM
 
2,218 posts, read 4,144,921 times
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I don't really have any advice, but I wanted to let you know that I have been in the same situation. I have a handful of successful (meaning I was pleased with my time and didn't feel like I was going to die at the end) half-marathons under my belt, but my running mentor keeps suggesting that I try a full.

I think I am at peace with the decision not to now. For me, it is a time issue. I just don't think I have enough free time in a week to get in the miles that would be necessary. And - I worry about getting injured. I don't want to end up not running at all because I overdid to get ready for a marathon.

I know what you mean about the distance - it just sounds pretty overwhelming, but you are right - at one point we felt the same about 13 miles too!

So, I guess my only advice is to make a decision, choose your next goal race then focus on solid training.

Good Luck!
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Old 09-16-2010, 03:47 PM
 
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It is daunting, but if you can do a half marathon you can do the full distance..

It is more mental than physical if you can already run 13 miles.

Give yourself plenty of time to slowly increase your mileage and try to get in at least one long run of at least 20 miles a few weeks before your planned race.

You mentioned the Galloway program, you might try to hook up with a local Galloway group and train with them. There are groups everywhere.

I ran my first marathon wayyy before gels were even available, no one NEEDS to use them but they are helpful. If you plan to use them in the race then you should get used to using them in training.

My long run method isn't for everyone but I have easy access to the Duke cross country course which is a 3 mile loop in the woods. I park at the entrance and that way I have easy access to water, gatorade, gels, towels whatever I want after each loop and I will do 7-8 loops during the end of my training periods.

Injuries happen and the further you run, the longer you are out there, especially with tired muscles you do open yourself to a greater risk of injury. Thats why you should give yourself several months, 6 if you can, to gradually build up the mileage.

I tell friends all the time if they are "thinking"of doing the marathon they are half way there, training is hard and time consuming but it is doable.

There is no feeling in the world like crossing the finish line of a marathon....especially your first. And its something no one can ever take from you.... once you finish you are a marathoner...

I say go for it.....
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Old 09-16-2010, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Here
1,302 posts, read 782,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alley01 View Post
Any tips? I have completed a few half marathons, and my friends are trying to encourage me to do a full marathon in January (I just completed my last half on Sunday) and although I have gotten used to running the half and been fairly successful with my pacing, I just can't imagine willingly doubling that amount of distance.

For my training, I stick with the Hal Higdon Novice programs and pair them with the Jeff Galloway Intervals - I tried 30 seconds of running then 30 seconds of walking last weekend and improved my last half marathon time by a half an hour!! I hit the wall at mile 10 because that was my longest recent run, so I now know that I need to go a little over the distance so that I don't in the future. The plan through Hal Higdon will work in time for the full marathon but the distance is just daunting to me.

How did you make the transition? Was it easy, did you end up getting any injuries? How did you keep the motivation up? Are you dependent on gels the entire time when I only needed Gu Chomps in the beginning and a gel at mile 9 to be okay? The race I am looking at is entirely flat (except for a couple small hills) so it wouldn't be in the same category as the Boston Marathon! Thankfully!

It just seems out of reach...but then again, I felt the same way before I completed my first half marathon so maybe I am just overthinking this?

TIA for any suggestions!
I'll go at you with something different.

My sister used to smoke cigarettes and sit on the sofa watching TV. Then about fifteen years ago she decided to quit smoking, get in shape and run a marathon. She was never terribly overweight so she trained for about six or eight months for this marathon. The big day came and I waited for her at around the halfway point, and then again at the finish line. And yeah, she did finish.

I went over to her house a few days after the marathon and she was sitting on the porch smoking a cigarette and drinking a beer. I can safely say that I was shocked. I asked her what the hell was going on and she told me that she had a goal to run in a marathon and the goal and been satisfied. She never ran another step.

A few years ago a friend of mine wanted me to run a marathon with her. I told her that I didn't think running a marathon was a particularly good idea. It is, in my opinion, a distance that is unhealthy in its length. She seemed undeterred. I asked her if she ran for her health or to compete against others. She did not have a ready answer. Apparently she had not given it any thought. Anyway, she ran in the marathon, and a half marathon a few months later. Shortly thereafter she had to quit with chronic hip pain.

I've been running for about 35 years. I average about 16-20 miles a week. Through the years I've run about five half marathons, and a number of other runs of various distances around 10 miles. So unlike both my sister and my friend, I'm not a marathoner. But I'm the guy still out there running.
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Old 09-17-2010, 12:36 AM
 
5,216 posts, read 9,016,214 times
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I think that an important message to take from the previous two posts is that if you are going to do this, you'll be well advised to work up to it gradually. Notice the amount of time Bluedevilz recommended taking to work up to marathon distance. My gut is telling me that January is probably a little too soon to shoot for. Think more in terms of next spring or summer.
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Old 09-17-2010, 11:10 PM
 
2,071 posts, read 1,853,926 times
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the general rule of thumb I've always heard is no more than 5% increase of your total weekly mileage for each week. And it makes sense, you are way more likely to get injured adding miles on... go slowly. It's not worth injuring yourself and being completely out of commision.
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Old 09-19-2010, 03:20 PM
 
7,673 posts, read 9,555,042 times
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Make sure you include a lot of cross-training so you don't injur yourself

--spinning
--yoga
--swimming

All are great to include with your running schedule. If you are not already weight training is really important. Work your core to keep the weight off your knees and prevent fatigue. You will love it!
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Old 09-19-2010, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Brambleton, VA
2,187 posts, read 3,697,337 times
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Thanks everyone. I definitely do a lot of cross training in addition to my training and am very much stuck to the Hal Higdon Novice plans. Which are very much gradual. I think I will add some extra mileage to my longest run before the full marathon to avoid hitting the wall. I actually don't get tired really, I just get bored. But, adding the Galloway Intervals that were 30 seconds run/30 seconds walk helped push through the bored feelings a bit more. I agree that it does seem to be very psychological.

The only thing slowing me down is a strain of my IT band on my left leg. The foam roller is helping (but hurts a ton) so I hope to get back to normal soon so that I can resume my training. My last half had a very sloped course with curbs and because there were 14,000 runners, I ended up having to pass people nearly each interval I ran. The easiest way seemed to be on the outside using the curbs but I didn't think that through entirely. I will definitely stay on the level ground next time!

I appreciate all the tips! January will be here before I know it!
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Old 09-20-2010, 08:56 AM
 
1,403 posts, read 2,062,769 times
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I'll jump in here since you've mentioned IT band issues...

I've also had IT band issues in the past and what I noticed is that it bothers me whenever I ramp up my mileage and training...say if I was training to ramp up from a half-to-full marathon.

My recommendation is to find a good marathon training program (I think Hal higdon was recommended-I've used them for all of my stand-alone marathon trainings), follow it, and see how your IT band holds up. IT band pain can be ameliorated by stretching (its REALLY difficult to get a good stretch on it), rolling, and some cross-training/weight lifting to prevent muscle imbalances. Good luck!
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Old 09-20-2010, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Brambleton, VA
2,187 posts, read 3,697,337 times
Reputation: 2058
Quote:
Originally Posted by broadbill View Post
I'll jump in here since you've mentioned IT band issues...

I've also had IT band issues in the past and what I noticed is that it bothers me whenever I ramp up my mileage and training...say if I was training to ramp up from a half-to-full marathon.

My recommendation is to find a good marathon training program (I think Hal higdon was recommended-I've used them for all of my stand-alone marathon trainings), follow it, and see how your IT band holds up. IT band pain can be ameliorated by stretching (its REALLY difficult to get a good stretch on it), rolling, and some cross-training/weight lifting to prevent muscle imbalances. Good luck!
I never had the pain until I did the Half a few weeks ago. I had run 10 miles a week before and didn't have a problem, but will definitely go the Galloway route for distance and up it to a couple miles over 26.2. I am using the foam roller which although is the closest thing to torture, does seem to work.

I don't think it was distance only because the IT pain was well before the 7 mile mark. I really do believe that the Disneyland Half course was a bit more banked than I had expected. I am definitely going to focus on strengthening my hip abductors. I also have a shortened achilles tendon on my left foot (which is the side my IT band started to hurt on).

Any other cross training you would recommend to strengthen the surrounding muscles to hopefully avoid this? I went from having tightness/pain going up and down the stairs to just going down stairs and now have no pain 99% of the time but I thought it would be good to continue the roller anyway. It seems to be a good ab exercise!
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