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Old 06-10-2011, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
7,563 posts, read 3,354,884 times
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So I'm still struggling to get rid of those last 10 pounds and was wondering if maybe some of it might be water-weight. How would you know the difference between fat and water-weight?

I'm thinking about trying a very low-carb diet for just 1 week. I know they say low-carb diets don't work because a lot of the initial weight loss is water weight (and then people go back to their old habits), but that's specifically my goal: to lose any flab and weight, that may be water-weight and not fat. I eat a healthy (with no unhealthy carbs or processed foods) 2000 calories per day, do cardio 6x per week (3x elliptical, 2x running, and 1x spinning class) and lift 3-4x per week, so I have already established healthy habits. But I've heard that you can lose like 5 pounds in one week by going low carb.

Any advice would be appreciated. I'm not trying to rely on a low carb diet to lose fat, I simply want to lose excess water weight.
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Old 06-10-2011, 06:45 PM
 
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Not sure who "they" are when you say "they" say low carb diets don't work. Low carb diets work very well, actually superior to standard diets touted by mainstream media and health organizations. The criticisms I have heard about people gaining weight back after getting off the low carb diet are curiously dubious, because I would like to find out just which diets take weight off and keep it off after you stop dieting.

Basically just saying that to say this, yes low carb diets work. 1 week would probably not make a big difference unless you went super low such as Atkins style where you purposely go into ketosis. Problem is, you don't start burning a lot of fat with low carb until your body has made the initial adjustments to lack of carbs for fuel. The amount of time that transition takes will be different for everyone. You could give it a try and see if it works for you, but 1 week of it would be pretty harsh if you aren't planning to stick with it. The first week is the toughest week, it gets much easier after you are over the initial hump.
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Old 06-10-2011, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,141 posts, read 16,497,023 times
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You might achieve the same result by just cutting your calories to 1,500 a day for awhile and maybe upping your cardio workouts to longer duration (I generally do about two hours a day). Five pounds at this point is probably unrealistic in one week but you may be able to do it in two. What's the rush?
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Old 06-11-2011, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Brandon, FL
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Almost all the weight on your body is technically 'water weight' since all your cells are fluid-based. Weigh yourself before you go far a long run, then weight yourself afterwards. All that weight you lose is sweat. You can gain / lose 5-10 pounds of water weight a day depending on what you eat and what activity you engage in (and probably what phase the moon is in). Your blood's thickness / thinness is a 'water weight' factor. The way you can look ripped one day, and bloated the next is a 'water weight' factor. Your body will manage this for you (based on your nutritional, chemical, and hormonal balance).

What you would most likely want to do, is reduce the number of fat cells through diet and exercise; and let the 'water weight' aspect take care of itself. Sitting in a sauna for hours may make your weight go down, and cuts the 'water weight'; but is only temporary. Your body will restore itself to its optimal fluid content shortly thereafter.

And, like you will read all over this and other boards, low-carb diets work.
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Old 06-12-2011, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gumbyfly View Post
You can gain / lose 5-10 pounds of water weight a day depending on what you eat and what activity you engage in (and probably what phase the moon is in)..
I've seen it swing a pound or two in a day but never 5-10. Apparently some other people must be a lot "spongier".
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Old 06-12-2011, 11:49 PM
 
Location: Brandon, FL
295 posts, read 801,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
I've seen it swing a pound or two in a day but never 5-10. Apparently some other people must be a lot "spongier".
I lost a pound just dropping the kids off at the pool, and then ran four miles in 90-degree heat to drop another four pounds of sweat. Yesterday was a 'rest' day, so I had some extra pounds to give back to the earth anyway. On long run days, I feel like a dry sponge. Apparently, I live in a pineapple under the sea...
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Old 06-13-2011, 08:52 AM
 
Location: US
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Carbs hold more water per gram within the body than protein. There is also research out there that points to eating more protein helps the body metabolize the carbs you do eat. Low carb or higher carb still do go by the basic principle of calories though. So if you are eating the same amount of calories but low carbing you will not change your weight much or at all as soon as you go back to eating carbs. Your body will just hold the water again. Try changing your diet by just cutting a few carbs and replace those calories with lean proteins. That will be easier to stick to. If you are still too heavy then add more cardio to what you are doing plus lifting. It can be easier to put on lean tissue and keep it on when you have a program that includes more proteins that help the body build and suppport that type of tissue. Just a few pounds of muscle can give you a slight metabolic edge where you won't have weight gain come on so quickly if you slip up.
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Old 06-13-2011, 01:23 PM
 
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You can't really ever cut "water weight" as you body needs it to survive. What you can do is check to see if your body is retaining excess water. On most people this will be obvious in their legs. Look at you legs and ankles. Press you finger into you leg and pull it away. If it leaves and impression for more then a second you are most likely carrying excess water. Another good indication is large indentations around you calves when you remove your socks at the end of the day.

I was having problems retaining water when I had high BP. I was put on a diuretic and lost close to 15lbs in 2 weeks.
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Old 06-13-2011, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Wallis and Futuna
11,294 posts, read 17,082,031 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johna01374 View Post
You can't really ever cut "water weight" as you body needs it to survive. What you can do is check to see if your body is retaining excess water. On most people this will be obvious in their legs. Look at you legs and ankles. Press you finger into you leg and pull it away. If it leaves and impression for more then a second you are most likely carrying excess water. Another good indication is large indentations around you calves when you remove your socks at the end of the day.

I was having problems retaining water when I had high BP. I was put on a diuretic and lost close to 15lbs in 2 weeks.
This can -also- occur if you are properly hydrated, not retaining water, but stand on your feet without walking around for several hours in a row. It -also- occurs if you're on an airplane, as a result to cabin pressure changes. It can -also- occur if you are DEhydrated, because your body is retaining whatever water it can get ahold of. If that is the case, drinking MORE water and NOT taking a diuretic, can solve the problem. If you're dehydrated and take a diuretic, you can dehydrate yourself into an emergency room.
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