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Old 06-27-2012, 01:41 PM
 
Location: East Lansing, MI
8,808 posts, read 7,973,447 times
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Study: Not all calories are created equal - CBS News


...The researcher who led the study, Dr. David Ludwig, of Boston's Children Hospital, explained on "CBS This Morning," "These findings suggest, from a metabolic perspective, all calories are not alike. And for the best long-term outcomes, avoid restricting any major nutrients, either fat or carbohydrate, and focus on reducing refined carbs like white bread, white rice, potato products and sugary foods."

He added, "Our findings suggest that actually trying to restrict either carbs or fat is not the best way (to achieve long-term weight loss) and instead to focus on the quality of the fats and the quality of the carbs."...
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Old 06-27-2012, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
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"But all of the refined carbs that invaded our diets with the low-fat craze seems to lead to metabolic changes not only making us hungrier, but causing metabolism to fall. And that combination is a recipe for weight gain."

This guy is doing backflips to avoid saying what his own studies basically conclude: if you want to be full and if you want to burn fat, you have to eat fat.

No one ever got lean switching from instant oats to steel-cut oats, your body doesn't know how the oats were processed, and they affect your body the same. People do, on the other hand, get lean from dramatically cutting carbohydrate intake and upping fat intake.
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Old 06-27-2012, 03:37 PM
 
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Fine,but why would anyone risk burning about 150 extra calories a day and then risk developing heart disease?
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Old 06-27-2012, 07:00 PM
 
Location: NZ Wellington
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This may be true, but going from 3000 calories a day, to 1800 still cuts more weight then changing what I eat...
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Old 06-27-2012, 11:00 PM
 
Location: Tampa (by way of Omaha)
13,930 posts, read 19,160,240 times
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As I mentioned in another thread about this story, the bottom line remains the same. Calorie deficit equals weight loss, while a calorie surplus equals weight gain no matter what macronutrient breakdown you use.
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Old 06-28-2012, 06:45 AM
 
217 posts, read 375,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gplex View Post
This may be true, but going from 3000 calories a day, to 1800 still cuts more weight then changing what I eat...
Maybe but that 'loss' depends on what you're losing. If you're sustaining your body with adequate amount of quality proteins and carbohydrates, muscle loss will be minimized while excess fat reduction will be more significant. While when people cut too much and not feeding the body properly, the body will always try to balance that inadequate nutrition and start leeching into other storage. This could mean more muscle loss aside from some fat loss.

Just like how not all calories are created equal (the same old theory that pops on media every other day), fat/muscle loss will vary depending on how that person is sustaining their body.
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Old 06-28-2012, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Western North Carolina
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I do know that eating whole grains and lean protein do make me feel less hungry and more satisfied for a longer period of time than refined carbs do, maybe that's what they mean.

I also believe beyond a shadow of a doubt that drinking diet sodas increases a person's appetite. Every single fat person that I know drinks diet soda all day long like water, and every fat person I see at the grocery store has a cart full of diet soda in the checkout line.
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Old 06-28-2012, 07:24 AM
 
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It's true, the more the body has to work in order to obtain energy, the longer the person will feel full. Which is usually the case with whole foods. Simple carbs, fats and junk food maybe satisfying but only for a short period with the body utilizing sugar and other easy-to-process nutrients as energy. Of course the problem with that is people eat excess calories resulting in excess fat storage aside from becoming hungry sooner than someone eating healthy meals.

I agree, there's a lot of studies out there with artificial sweeteners; one show increased fat deposits while another shows cravings of real sugar as the person drinking it isn't getting the real deal. Whatever the psychological and physiological effects it has on the body, it's not a healthy option when comparing diet or non-diet sodas.
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Old 06-28-2012, 08:42 AM
 
Location: East Lansing, MI
8,808 posts, read 7,973,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bosco55David View Post
As I mentioned in another thread about this story, the bottom line remains the same. Calorie deficit equals weight loss, while a calorie surplus equals weight gain no matter what macronutrient breakdown you use.
Right, Bosco. I think what this study indicates is that a 500 calorie deficit, while eating the right foods, will lead to GREATER weight loss that is more easily sustained vs. eating a lot of highly processed carbs.
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Old 06-28-2012, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Tampa (by way of Omaha)
13,930 posts, read 19,160,240 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hooligan View Post
Right, Bosco. I think what this study indicates is that a 500 calorie deficit, while eating the right foods, will lead to GREATER weight loss that is more easily sustained vs. eating a lot of highly processed carbs.
Two points. Assuming a constant of an extra 150 calories burned, that's one extra pound lost every 23.3 days. Rather insignificant in the grand scheme of things. Also, a similar if not greater effect can be obtained by the consumption of ice cold water.
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