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Old 03-28-2014, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
1,473 posts, read 1,693,314 times
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I run & run & run and I love all forms of cardio & bodyweight exercises and the calories burn quickly, but they come right back when I eat.

But it's been years and I need to up my game, the body cannnot progress when doing the same things over & over.

Increased muscle = increased calorie burn 24/7.

I find Weightlifting intimidating however because of all the grunting, gawking guys back in that area of the gym. But strictly physiologically speaking, is weightlifting the way to go? I even studied weightlifting for six months at a PT school last year, though I filtered out much of what he taught us simply because it didn't appeal to me. Still I learned enough to realize that there are some merits to weight training. So maybe I should go there.

Any petite women reading this who have crossed over to the manly side of the gym? Tips to get over the intimidation and the "I hate this, I'd rather be out in the sunshine" factor?
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Old 03-28-2014, 12:01 PM
 
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I'm not a petite woman, but I have been good friends with several who did what you are asking about under my guidance - it's not as much of a big deal as you think it is in terms of the stress and adjustment to learning to do it. It is easy and there's so much literature on it, you will find some great exercises and routines pretty easily. Get a trainer, learn to warm up your body first by running just a few minutes and to do whatever yoga stretches work for your body, and then go for it. You will love how you feel and unless you start steroids you will continue to look awesomely feminine but you will get much stronger (both muscles and bones).

Best of luck
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Old 03-28-2014, 12:46 PM
 
5,339 posts, read 5,299,016 times
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If intimidated, you can start with some dumbbells at home and learn form from on line or store bought videos. IMO, one doesn't need a gym membership if one knows what they are doing but a gym mebership does offer some perks.

ANyway, everyone is intimidated by the atmoshpere at first. Once you get used to the layout of it and learn where things are it'll be more familiar and not intimidating.

I'm a guy, we gawk...watcha gonna do?! Ignore us...except for me that is, don't ignore me.

Best of luck.
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Old 03-28-2014, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Colorado
2,483 posts, read 3,534,600 times
Reputation: 2674
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zelpha View Post
I run & run & run and I love all forms of cardio & bodyweight exercises and the calories burn quickly, but they come right back when I eat. But it's been years and I need to up my game, the body cannnot progress when doing the same things over & over. Increased muscle = increased calorie burn 24/7. I find Weightlifting intimidating however because of all the grunting, gawking guys back in that area of the gym. But strictly physiologically speaking, is weightlifting the way to go? I even studied weightlifting for six months at a PT school last year, though I filtered out much of what he taught us simply because it didn't appeal to me. Still I learned enough to realize that there are some merits to weight training. So maybe I should go there. Any petite women reading this who have crossed over to the manly side of the gym? Tips to get over the intimidation and the "I hate this, I'd rather be out in the sunshine" factor?
Weightlifting has its advantages and there's a place for it in any fitness plan, but if you want the exhilaration of 'cardio' with some real strength benefits then I'd suggest a kickboxing and/or cross fit class over just joining a gym and pumping iron. That's about as interesting and challenging as running on a treadmill everyday. As for resistance training, I 100% agree with the suggestion that you can do almost everything you need to do with dumbbells. They're also a lot safer and have some core/balance advantages too.
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Old 03-28-2014, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
515 posts, read 812,270 times
Reputation: 821
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zelpha View Post
I run & run & run and I love all forms of cardio & bodyweight exercises and the calories burn quickly, but they come right back when I eat.

But it's been years and I need to up my game, the body cannnot progress when doing the same things over & over.

Increased muscle = increased calorie burn 24/7.

I find Weightlifting intimidating however because of all the grunting, gawking guys back in that area of the gym. But strictly physiologically speaking, is weightlifting the way to go? I even studied weightlifting for six months at a PT school last year, though I filtered out much of what he taught us simply because it didn't appeal to me. Still I learned enough to realize that there are some merits to weight training. So maybe I should go there.

Any petite women reading this who have crossed over to the manly side of the gym? Tips to get over the intimidation and the "I hate this, I'd rather be out in the sunshine" factor?
You'll find that most of the grunting, gawking guys are more afraid of you than you are of them. Or that they're nice and helpful. Most likely, you'll find they don't care about you since they're focused on themselves.

But yes, weight lifting offers tons of benefits that cardio and yoga cannot; increased lean muscle which increases metabolism, increased confidence and a body that works for you rather one that must be kept up with.

Lean Out and Tone Up
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Old 03-28-2014, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Mammoth Lakes, CA
3,160 posts, read 6,938,188 times
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For the OP: this forum is dominated enormously by weightlifters who disdain and belittle cardio. The above post personfieid this:

Quote:
Weight lifting offers tons of benefits that cardio and yoga cannot; increased lean muscle which increases metabolism, increased confidence and a body that works for you rather one that must be kept up with.
LOL! As if long distance running doesn't sculpt this body, build muscle, increase metabolism and give you confidence? The statement is patently absurd.

Here's my advice: the title of your post says it all. Do what you want to do! I know nothing about yoga, but the women I know who do it religiously have amazing bodies. Running I know a great deal about and if you enjoy it, continue it. You won't stick with strength training if you dislike it. What is your weekly mileage? If you're running 35 miles a week, you're burning off approximately 3500 calories which equals one pound.
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Old 03-28-2014, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Colorado
2,483 posts, read 3,534,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulysses61 View Post
For the OP: this forum is dominated enormously by weightlifters who disdain and belittle cardio. The above post personfieid this: LOL! As if long distance running doesn't sculpt this body, build muscle, increase metabolism and give you confidence? The statement is patently absurd. Here's my advice: the title of your post says it all. Do what you want to do! I know nothing about yoga, but the women I know who do it religiously have amazing bodies. Running I know a great deal about and if you enjoy it, continue it. You won't stick with strength training if you dislike it. What is your weekly mileage? If you're running 35 miles a week, you're burning off approximately 3500 calories which equals one pound.
I pretty much agree with ulysses but I also think that resistance training has its place too. A lot of weightlifters think all distance runners look like those freakishly gaunt marathoners that you sometimes see on TV. But some of the fittest people I know, with bodies that are lean and very toned, are capable of running incredibly long distances… I'm talking like 100+ miles in one session. But they don't go for speed and they eat a lot as they go. In fact, there's a race by my house happening tomorrow where about 30-40 people are going to be running 1-mile loops for 24 hours. None of the entrants I've met down there are ultra thin or unhealthy looking at all, but there aren't exactly any roidmonsters down there either. Don't get me wrong, I'm not suggesting that kind of running to anyone (it's not my thing either) but I can tell you first-hand that ultra-runners as a a group are some of the fittest people you will ever meet.
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Old 03-28-2014, 05:04 PM
 
1,373 posts, read 2,479,875 times
Reputation: 1426
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zelpha View Post
I run & run & run and I love all forms of cardio & bodyweight exercises and the calories burn quickly, but they come right back when I eat.

But it's been years and I need to up my game, the body cannnot progress when doing the same things over & over.

Increased muscle = increased calorie burn 24/7.

I find Weightlifting intimidating however because of all the grunting, gawking guys back in that area of the gym. But strictly physiologically speaking, is weightlifting the way to go? I even studied weightlifting for six months at a PT school last year, though I filtered out much of what he taught us simply because it didn't appeal to me. Still I learned enough to realize that there are some merits to weight training. So maybe I should go there.

Any petite women reading this who have crossed over to the manly side of the gym? Tips to get over the intimidation and the "I hate this, I'd rather be out in the sunshine" factor?

I only read your post & not other replies. IMO you could benefit from working out at home. I am a couple days from finishing ""ripped in 30"" by Jillian Michaels. Got it for free on you tube. Lost about 3 to 4 pounds in a month but I am a heavy drinker and MJ smoker. So I think someone with better habits could benefit more.

Or try kettlebell workouts, if guys are gawking at you at the gym, there is no need to go there. Buy some weights and work out at home.

But then again, I'm biased against the gym. In between driving, parking, etc you lose valuable time which could have been used for your workout.
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Old 03-28-2014, 05:17 PM
 
3,154 posts, read 3,060,480 times
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I crossed over to the manly side of the gym 30 years ago, when some gyms actually had rules against it. I just ignored the negative looks and pressed on - eventually people began to respect me. Today I don't really see a manly side of the gym - women are everywhere and the clubs are nice and clean and all fitness-looking (when I started, real gyms were dirty underground man caves). However, these days I really can't stand being inside and prefer to run and do other things. I have my own little home gym in a sunny room and I use it a couple of times a week, but I really have no desire to go back to a big, dark gym. Back when I loved the gym, I was single and young and enjoyed the "view" there more than outside.
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Old 03-28-2014, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Northern Appalachia
5,158 posts, read 6,350,993 times
Reputation: 6027
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zelpha View Post
I run & run & run and I love all forms of cardio & bodyweight exercises and the calories burn quickly, but they come right back when I eat.

But it's been years and I need to up my game, the body cannnot progress when doing the same things over & over.

Increased muscle = increased calorie burn 24/7.

I find Weightlifting intimidating however because of all the grunting, gawking guys back in that area of the gym. But strictly physiologically speaking, is weightlifting the way to go? I even studied weightlifting for six months at a PT school last year, though I filtered out much of what he taught us simply because it didn't appeal to me. Still I learned enough to realize that there are some merits to weight training. So maybe I should go there.

Any petite women reading this who have crossed over to the manly side of the gym? Tips to get over the intimidation and the "I hate this, I'd rather be out in the sunshine" factor?
It sounds like you already belong and go to a gym so you have already made the first step. You should definitely lift weights. Aerobic exercises like running are mainly good for your cardiovascular system. It obviously burns some calories but you have proven to yourself that it is not the solution for losing weight. Weightlifting will do more for your physical appearance than running. I've done both consistently for the past twenty years. Some of the responses you received here are inaccurate. This is not a weightlifting or running forum, and there are not that many serious members of either group here.

First of all, there are more and more women who are lifting weights but there are still many gyms where the males greatly outnumber the females. There are also still many misconceptions about lifting weights especially for women. I suggest you find someone to show you around the weightlifting section of your gym. You might want to hire a personal trainer or find someone who lifts there. It is a good idea to have them watch your form and suggest some exercises. I recommend you start with resistance machines and gradually incorporate some dumbbell and barbell exercises. You could start out with around eight different exercises and do one set of around ten repetitions. You could gradually increase the sets to two or three sets. The biggest mistake many women make is lifting with very light weights. You should lift with heavy enough weights that you can't complete the 10th or 11th repetition.

You will gradually come up with a group of upper body, lower body and abdominal exercises. Give yourself a few months before you start making major changes. You will probably not be ready yet to do things like most barbell exercises, kettlebells, etc. Just take your time and make gradual adjustments.,
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