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Old 07-09-2009, 04:10 PM
 
1,467 posts, read 1,881,341 times
Reputation: 22487

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DennyCrane View Post
As someone who has struggled with his weight, I have great sympathy for people who struggle with theirs cause I know how easy it is to gain it and how hard it is to lose it. Mearth made an excellent point earlier about distinguishing between fault and responsibility. In my case, I not only accepted responsibility for doing the work to lose the weight, I also accepted fault for gaining it in the first place. My weight gain was brought on, in part, by depression. I used food to make myself feel better. Luckily, I never became obese or severely overweight. But I also know, from my own experience, just how easy it is to make excuses. I blamed my social circle, the low cost of junk food, and even the culture as a whole. It was only after I stopped doing that and looked to myself as the cause of my weight gain that I was able to reverse it.

Someone earlier said that many people make poor food choices because they don't know any better. The problem I have with that is that we live in a world where lack of information is no longer an issue. If you're interested in learning about any subject, it's not hard to do so thanks to the internet. Growing up, I knew nothing of nutrition because I slept through health classes and my parents were too focused on getting me to do my homework. Plus, how many kids listen to their parents when they start preaching about eating your vegetables? But when I gained weight, I took it upon myself to learn all about nutrition and exercise. So if you're ignorant about a given subject, ask yourself why and whether you've ever taken the time to educate yourself?

As for blaming the culture at large, that's the easy way out. Yes, we're surrounded by tons of fast food options and people who don't value their health. But the idea that we're a product of our culture shouldn't be used as an excuse. I'm a product of my parents. If my parents didn't prioritize health, should I as an adult blame them? I don't think so. I have free will and should be able to accept blame for my own choices.

Personally, I've never bought into the idea of laziness. People do what they're motivated to do and avoid doing something not because they're lazy, but because they don't have a strong enough desire. I'm sure many of us would love to make a lot of money. But a lot of us aren't willing to work the long hours, suffer through endless schooling, or whatever else it takes to land those high-paying jobs. Does that make us lazy? No. It just means we don't think it's worth the effort. Same with losing weight. I know plenty of people who talk of losing weight. But they don't want to exercise or change their eating habits. I don't view them as lazy. I just view them as deciding that losing weight isn't important enough to them to work that hard. But there are other things they're more than willing to bust their butts for.

There's a lot of new research in the area of mental illnesses that show almost all of them can be traced back to diet. Of course, the drug companies don't want you to believe this because then they won't be able to push their pills on you. But if obesity is a mental illness and if mental illness is a product of lifestyle choices, then we're back to the same root cause. BTW, my depression wasn't cured by drugs. It was cured by eating right and exercise, which also helped me lose weight. Pretty nice when two problems have the same solution.
Denny, I have already given you points, so I cannot give you anymore. It goes without saying, but I really think that you nailed this one
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Old 07-09-2009, 05:58 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,527 posts, read 29,240,196 times
Reputation: 21263
Quote:
Originally Posted by DennyCrane View Post
As someone who has struggled with his weight, I have great sympathy for people who struggle with theirs cause I know how easy it is to gain it and how hard it is to lose it. Mearth made an excellent point earlier about distinguishing between fault and responsibility. In my case, I not only accepted responsibility for doing the work to lose the weight, I also accepted fault for gaining it in the first place. My weight gain was brought on, in part, by depression. I used food to make myself feel better. Luckily, I never became obese or severely overweight. But I also know, from my own experience, just how easy it is to make excuses. I blamed my social circle, the low cost of junk food, and even the culture as a whole. It was only after I stopped doing that and looked to myself as the cause of my weight gain that I was able to reverse it.

Someone earlier said that many people make poor food choices because they don't know any better. The problem I have with that is that we live in a world where lack of information is no longer an issue. If you're interested in learning about any subject, it's not hard to do so thanks to the internet. Growing up, I knew nothing of nutrition because I slept through health classes and my parents were too focused on getting me to do my homework. Plus, how many kids listen to their parents when they start preaching about eating your vegetables? But when I gained weight, I took it upon myself to learn all about nutrition and exercise. So if you're ignorant about a given subject, ask yourself why and whether you've ever taken the time to educate yourself?

As for blaming the culture at large, that's the easy way out. Yes, we're surrounded by tons of fast food options and people who don't value their health. But the idea that we're a product of our culture shouldn't be used as an excuse. I'm a product of my parents. If my parents didn't prioritize health, should I as an adult blame them? I don't think so. I have free will and should be able to accept blame for my own choices.

Personally, I've never bought into the idea of laziness. People do what they're motivated to do and avoid doing something not because they're lazy, but because they don't have a strong enough desire. I'm sure many of us would love to make a lot of money. But a lot of us aren't willing to work the long hours, suffer through endless schooling, or whatever else it takes to land those high-paying jobs. Does that make us lazy? No. It just means we don't think it's worth the effort. Same with losing weight. I know plenty of people who talk of losing weight. But they don't want to exercise or change their eating habits. I don't view them as lazy. I just view them as deciding that losing weight isn't important enough to them to work that hard. But there are other things they're more than willing to bust their butts for.

There's a lot of new research in the area of mental illnesses that show almost all of them can be traced back to diet. Of course, the drug companies don't want you to believe this because then they won't be able to push their pills on you. But if obesity is a mental illness and if mental illness is a product of lifestyle choices, then we're back to the same root cause. BTW, my depression wasn't cured by drugs. It was cured by eating right and exercise, which also helped me lose weight. Pretty nice when two problems have the same solution.
Gosh, for so long people kept trying to convince me that my eating was somehow linked to my emotions. Obviously, this is a fairly common scenario. However, in my case, it was not. I do not eat when I am alone, or tired, or upset, or afraid or any of those emotions. I do not even eat when I am not hungry, which seems to be kind of common as well. The only time eat is truly when I am hungry. I cannot tell you how many times I have gone to clinics or diet counselors or nutritionists who give me a blank stare when they start talking about "behavior modification", as it relates to eating food.

I suppose it would be even harder if there was some sinister cause of my hunger but there's not. I am just hungry. You can't psychoanalize that away. LOL

As for eating what is good for you versus what is not. I cannot get past the taste thing. I really admire the eat to live people, I really do.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 07-09-2009, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Colorado
2 posts, read 650 times
Reputation: 10
eating to cope or control emotions/laziness/pituitary& thyroid complications or boredom.
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Old 07-09-2009, 08:23 PM
 
Location: James Island, SC
1,628 posts, read 3,094,943 times
Reputation: 926
Quote:
Originally Posted by davey123 View Post
Denny, I have already given you points, so I cannot give you anymore. It goes without saying, but I really think that you nailed this one
Woohoo! We agree!
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Old 07-10-2009, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Nova Scotia
458 posts, read 1,136,602 times
Reputation: 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaBeez View Post
I am beginning to believe that obesity IS as much of a mental illness/disease as it is a physical illness/disease. I compare it to alcoholism or drug addiction where people who suffer from it KNOW that its killing them, but they seem to either refuse to do anything about it, or they are simply just unable to do anything. Many (unlike alcoholics or drug addicts) simply dont even try and say "well, these are the cards I was dealt" or something similar.

All too often, when working with students/clients who are obese (and even talking to those here on CD) a common theme is that they dont want to, or simply cannot give up or change their eating habits. Tell them what they need to do and its always "Oh, can I still drink my diet cokes?", "I just love doughnuts" or "Its too hard to eat right". They just cant seem to get conscious control over their stomachs and taste buds even though they KNOW THEY ARE KILLING THEMSELVES.

Recommend an exercise program and they refuse or say "I cant do that", "Its too hard", "I dont have time", or they just opt for whatever is the easiest thing to do. Or worse yet, they opt for HCG shots and 500 calorie diets, "master cleanse" coffee colonics and fasting, gastric surgery, or any other number of DANGEROUS AND EXTREMELY UNHEALTHY methods to lose weight. They seem to ignore the medically and scientifically proven fact that YOUR BODY NEEDS PROPER NUTRITION TO RUN EFFICIENTLY. Whereas, you need to eat the right foods in the proper amounts to both maintain proper functioning of the bodys internal organs, and proper weight (loss). But instead, they opt for drinking lemon water, eating one meal per day and hope to lose weight.

I think the cause of the disconnect in knowing what needs to be done, but not doing it, or even trying to do it, is some form of mental disconnect/illness that prevents them from doing the right thing. Even though they may say "I try", "I want to do the right thing" or any other excuse, the bottom line is that they dont or worse yet, say "I just gave up".
I think people who eat for whatever reason, whether it is emotional or stress etc, it has become a habit. At first when they are at a healthy weight, there is a life changing moment and they turn to food. So they form a habit which takes about 30 days to do. (so they say) Which if there is something very stressful in your life may not be fixed yet in that time, so you had 30 days to form a habit, so it is now a habit to grab some kind for comfort food to help with stress etc.

It is the same with booze, you start to drink, and find it allowed you to forget, so you continue to drink until it becomes a habit to forget. I believe a lot of "illnesses" are formed out of habit and not because of some medical issue. not all but some.

I went through a horrible relationship with my ex. I turned to food once it ended and gained 60lbs. Until one day I woke up when I grabbed a bag of chips when I was upset about something else. It dawned on me that this is what I did when the relationship ended. So I was aware of this and changed my habit. When I was upset and wanted chips I went for a walk.

Now I ice climb, rock climb, hike and I am back to doing yoga. So when I find I am upset about something I now still go for a walk. Another habit formed, a healthy one. I lost the 60lbs 8yrs ago
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Old 07-10-2009, 11:59 PM
 
Location: James Island, SC
1,628 posts, read 3,094,943 times
Reputation: 926
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belinda_Cooperstone1 View Post
I believe a lot of "illnesses" are formed out of habit and not because of some medical issue. not all but some.
Hmmm, fair point.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Belinda_Cooperstone1 View Post
Now I ice climb, rock climb, hike and I am back to doing yoga. So when I find I am upset about something I now still go for a walk. Another habit formed, a healthy one. I lost the 60lbs 8yrs ago
Awesome! I don't have the balls to ice climb
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Old 07-11-2009, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Kenmore, WA
7,359 posts, read 6,216,841 times
Reputation: 10577
Perhaps I am mistaken, but I read a less than sincere interest in the answer to the question, than a desire to receive validation of your own prejudgments. You don't mention any direct knowledge of obesity, yours or an intimate's, nor do you use any concrete examples study results to support your opinion.

I hope you are not falling prey to your own designated self-authority. Conjectures formed in a vacuum could lead to speculation on your own mental state.

Though under-weight until the age of two, I was first put on a doctor's diet regimen at the age of five, and have managed with great effort to keep my weight within the medical norms most of my life. Still, with the new standard measuring obesity as a percentage of body fat to total weight, I am still obese. In honest appraisal of my peers, obese or not, I see a wide range of eating habits. Many people I see eat constantly (and I do feel envious), and never gain a pound. Others watch every morsel of carefully selected, healthy foods, and still gain. And, then, of course, there are the majority that don't follow either category and may or may not be obese.

I think if you are truly interested in the topic of obesity, there are other venues for you to gain a more honest understanding.
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Old 07-11-2009, 11:04 AM
 
Location: SoCal - Sherman Oaks & Woodland Hills
12,977 posts, read 28,809,137 times
Reputation: 10491
[quote=lorilou;9643917]
Quote:

Okay, let's play by your rules: I'm fat...hope that makes you feel better.
I cannot get a grasp of what you do, but I have picked up several references that you somehow "work" with overweight clients? My God, I hope NOT. Your lack of knowledge and compassion is very disturbing.
Somehow you really seem to believe that this is a simple topic. Your stream of consciousness says, "I have no problems putting down donuts, therefore no one else should either...I exercise everyday, why can't everyone else?" Are you really that simplistic? Really?
Do you think that people who go through life being ostracized and criticized by the likes of you consider this rejection a matter of choice? You seem to believe that just because you think something, it is now scientific evidence. Maybe you have a problem with arrogance or narcissism, you might want to look into that. Maybe it's a mental disorder.

You might want to consider this for a few moments before you just react out of anger. So much of what you have contributed here is simply rude and hurtful to the people who suffer in silence.
Wow. Just wow. I go spend a few days in Vegas and come back to many many rep points from this thread, and also many people attacking me for no reason. Your response (especially what is highlighted in red) is typical of someone with inability to participate in a discussion without feeling the need to attack others because of your own insecurities. I understand how you feel and I forgive you for how your reacted.

There is nothing "rude" about any of my comments (unlike your rude comments to me). I find that many of the negative/rude/attacking responses are not unlike how alcoholics or drug addicts react to people questioning them on why they continue with their harmful behavior. I think this is a valid topic and appreciate many of the insights of the posters here who are participating in this valid discussion without attacking others for their viewpoints and questions.
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Old 07-11-2009, 11:19 AM
 
Location: SoCal - Sherman Oaks & Woodland Hills
12,977 posts, read 28,809,137 times
Reputation: 10491
Quote:
Originally Posted by plaidmom View Post
I also have a thing about "gym rats" (since we are admitting our biases here). Yeah, so I am going to step on a lot of toes now. I guess I just don't see the point of pumping oneself up, of the sweat and effort and time spent, just to stand in front of a mirror and preen and feel superior. WTF?

There is a whole, big wide world out there. Get out in it! Consider transferring some of that strength and fitness into, oh, cycling, running, hiking, surfing, paddling, climbing etc etc etc. Geeze!
You're not stepping on toes here, I agree with you on this. My goals for working out are 99% performance and health related. The looks are a neat byproduct of working out but not my goal.

I think a lot of people are missing the point of this thread and are getting caught up in being defensive and/or negative about the topic. As humans, we are faced with choices each and every day of our lives, sometimes we make poor choices, other times we make good choices, but the bottom line is that WE CHOOSE what we do, what we eat, where we go, how to maintain health, etc. But I am really trying to understand how can one make a conscious decision to continue to both eat unhealthily and not take care of their physical health.
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Old 07-11-2009, 02:33 PM
 
Location: James Island, SC
1,628 posts, read 3,094,943 times
Reputation: 926
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
I hope you are not falling prey to your own designated self-authority. Conjectures formed in a vacuum could lead to speculation on your own mental state.
Well said!

Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
Still, with the new standard measuring obesity as a percentage of body fat to total weight, I am still obese.
What??? I'd be thrilled to look like you when I'm your age!
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