U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Alaska > Fairbanks
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-23-2012, 08:22 PM
 
20 posts, read 30,721 times
Reputation: 16

Advertisements

So I am interviewing for a job in Fairbanks this week. I feel fairly confident I could land the job for several reasons. So coming from New Jersey, what should I know should I accept a job offer in Fairbanks? What's the best way to move there, by air or by car (I'm a recent graduate with a four door sedan that currently does not run).

I think it would be a great adventure, even if I only stay for a couple of years. I've certainly never lived in a place like Fairbanks before, and would welcome the challenge. That being said, what about the cold? I think the coldest temperature I've ever experienced in my life is right around 0 F or maybe a degree or two below it (not counting wind chills). Am I going to die? What kind of gear should I buy? More importantly, how much will that stuff run me?

Since I don't know anybody in town, what would be the best thing for me to do upon arriving in town while I search for apartments? Get a hotel?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-23-2012, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Anchorage
4,045 posts, read 5,433,684 times
Reputation: 2207
Ha ha, you're not going to die. Since your car is broken down, you should either get a really reliable one or fly up. No fancy gear is needed unless you plan on being outside in the winter for an extended period of time. You will probably want a vehicle because waiting for a bus in the middle of winter is no fun. You may find that the cold of Fairbanks isn't as miserable as you might think because it's a dry cold. Hoping your job prospect pays really well because housing and heating is really expensive.

Oh, I should mention that hotels are very expensive in the summer, and if you look for rentals on Craigslist, only respond to ads with phone numbers, all the ones I emailed were Nigerian scams.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2012, 09:41 AM
 
20 posts, read 30,721 times
Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by gobrien View Post
Ha ha, you're not going to die. Since your car is broken down, you should either get a really reliable one or fly up. No fancy gear is needed unless you plan on being outside in the winter for an extended period of time. You will probably want a vehicle because waiting for a bus in the middle of winter is no fun. You may find that the cold of Fairbanks isn't as miserable as you might think because it's a dry cold. Hoping your job prospect pays really well because housing and heating is really expensive.

Oh, I should mention that hotels are very expensive in the summer, and if you look for rentals on Craigslist, only respond to ads with phone numbers, all the ones I emailed were Nigerian scams.

The job pays $45k a year before taxes. Would that be enough for a single guy with no kids in his 20s? Also, is it fairly easy to find a vehicle in Alaska or is it better to find something in the lower 48 and drive up? I would not want to make that long drive to Alaska, I'd prefer to fly if possible.

Can you seriously get by in Fairbanks in the winter with "nothing fancy"? Doesn't it get down to 40 and 50 degrees below zero there?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2012, 09:50 AM
 
20 posts, read 30,721 times
Reputation: 16
Also, what are you calling expensive for housing? Remember I'm moving from one of the most expensive parts of the country. You can't find a 1-bedroom for less than $1,000 a month here, and if you do, it will be a cesspool. Is it that expensive in Fairbanks as well? Also, what do you think typical heating bills might run in the winter, say if I kept my house at 65 F or so in a 1-bedroom?

I know I'm getting ahead of myself (haven't even interviewed yet) but I feel like I need to take extra precautions and ask many more questions in preparation for a move to Fairbanks. Also, it's the only job propsect on the horizon for me right now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2012, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Anchorage
4,045 posts, read 5,433,684 times
Reputation: 2207
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jazzman256 View Post
The job pays $45k a year before taxes. Would that be enough for a single guy with no kids in his 20s? Also, is it fairly easy to find a vehicle in Alaska or is it better to find something in the lower 48 and drive up? I would not want to make that long drive to Alaska, I'd prefer to fly if possible.

Can you seriously get by in Fairbanks in the winter with "nothing fancy"? Doesn't it get down to 40 and 50 degrees below zero there?
It depends on how long you plan to stay outside. I just wore a warm coat with a hood, didn't wear gloves or boots. Even during the middle of winter I would see people running into grocery stores with less on than me. It's good to bring proper winter gear along in the car in case it breaks down though. It's easy to find a properly winterized vehicle in Fairbanks but it will probably cost more than buying one where you are at, but then you'll have a long drive, along with the gas expenses getting here.

That should be enough money to survive on, try to find an apt with heat included. Craigslist and the Fairbanks Daily News Miner classifieds should give you a good enough idea on rents for the area. A "dry" cabin is one without water, although some have small water tanks that you can get filled.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2012, 10:38 AM
 
20 posts, read 30,721 times
Reputation: 16
I'd imagine that I wouldn't be spending any time outside in the winter - unless I don't want to (i.e. my car breaks down). The job is indoors. Also, what's this about having to plug up your engine block in the winter? How do you do that? Is it expensive?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2012, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,862 posts, read 11,777,534 times
Reputation: 6296
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jazzman256 View Post
So I am interviewing for a job in Fairbanks this week. I feel fairly confident I could land the job for several reasons. So coming from New Jersey, what should I know should I accept a job offer in Fairbanks? What's the best way to move there, by air or by car (I'm a recent graduate with a four door sedan that currently does not run).

I think it would be a great adventure, even if I only stay for a couple of years. I've certainly never lived in a place like Fairbanks before, and would welcome the challenge. That being said, what about the cold? I think the coldest temperature I've ever experienced in my life is right around 0 F or maybe a degree or two below it (not counting wind chills). Am I going to die? What kind of gear should I buy? More importantly, how much will that stuff run me?

Since I don't know anybody in town, what would be the best thing for me to do upon arriving in town while I search for apartments? Get a hotel?
Fairbanks has similar summer temperatures to New Jersey. The biggest difference during the summer is the amount of daylight you will be experiencing in Fairbanks. The sun will not set until after midnight and then will rise again about three hours later.

Winters in Fairbanks can be brutally cold, and the nights are just as long as the summer days were. You can easily prepare for the cold by wearing multiple layers of clothing. However, a lot of people have difficulty adjusting to the long winter nights. By Winter Solstice there will only be about three hours of daylight.

Sell your car and buy a plane ticket. You can buy another vehicle after you arrive. You should be able to find a place to live in the Fairbanks Daily Miner.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jazzman256 View Post
The job pays $45k a year before taxes. Would that be enough for a single guy with no kids in his 20s? Also, is it fairly easy to find a vehicle in Alaska or is it better to find something in the lower 48 and drive up? I would not want to make that long drive to Alaska, I'd prefer to fly if possible.

Can you seriously get by in Fairbanks in the winter with "nothing fancy"? Doesn't it get down to 40 and 50 degrees below zero there?
At $45K a year, you should be able to afford approximately $800 per month in rent. You can find a vehicle in Fairbanks pretty easily, and it will most likely already have a block heater.

As far as the cold is concerned, as gobrien said, it depends on how long you will be outdoors. Yes, the temperatures do drop to -50F or colder in the Interior. Look into the Extended Cold Weather Clothing System (ECWCS) the military produces. You should be able to find what you need at an Army Surplus store, if not in New Jersey then certainly in Fairbanks. The trick is to dress in layers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jazzman256 View Post
Also, what are you calling expensive for housing? Remember I'm moving from one of the most expensive parts of the country. You can't find a 1-bedroom for less than $1,000 a month here, and if you do, it will be a cesspool. Is it that expensive in Fairbanks as well? Also, what do you think typical heating bills might run in the winter, say if I kept my house at 65 F or so in a 1-bedroom?

I know I'm getting ahead of myself (haven't even interviewed yet) but I feel like I need to take extra precautions and ask many more questions in preparation for a move to Fairbanks. Also, it's the only job propsect on the horizon for me right now.
Housing in Fairbanks is not as expensive as New Jersey, but you will be paying more for other items (like gasoline, food, etc.). You should be able to find a decent unfurnished one bedroom apartment for around $800 per month.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jazzman256 View Post
I'd imagine that I wouldn't be spending any time outside in the winter - unless I don't want to (i.e. my car breaks down). The job is indoors. Also, what's this about having to plug up your engine block in the winter? How do you do that? Is it expensive?
You will want to spend some time outdoors. If you do not, then there is a good possibility you will end up with Cabin Fever, a.k.a. Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), which will lead to depression. To prevent SAD there are three steps to take:
  • Maintain a regular sleep schedule, regardless of what time the sun actually sets;
  • Get outside and stay active; and
  • Add additional lights to your apartment during the winter.
People will also keep extra clothing, blankets, or even a sleeping bag in their vehicles in case they break down during the winter. If you find yourself broken down on an isolated road during the winter the best thing you can do is stay with your vehicle. Your vehicle will provide shelter against the elements, you just need to stay warm until someone stops to help. Like New Jersey, Alaska has a "Good Samaritan" law that immunizes those who stop to help from any liability. Alaskans are very good at stopping to help people in need, particularly during the winter.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2012, 01:03 PM
 
107 posts, read 116,184 times
Reputation: 54
Default Possibly moving to Fairbanks from the Northeast, what should I know?

Where oh where do I begin ~ lol?? Originally from Minnesota and having traveled quite a bit through Alaska I think I've got an idea of where you're at and questions you need answered.

I took my granddaughter for a month long trip to Alaska and Canada. In Alaska we went to: Anchorage, Seward, Fairbanks, North Pole, Arctic Circle, Denali, Mt. McKinley, Kenai Peninsula, Whittier, Glacier Bay National Park, Skagway, Juneau, and Ketchikan. In Canada: Yukon Territory, British Columbia, and Vancouver Island. If there's a mode of transportation invented we took it!! That includes, but not limited to: planes - jet (flying into Anchorage airport, which is the easiest and most accessible airport to maneuver), Piper 8-seater (flying to the Arctic Circle), Cessna 4-seater with skis for landing gear (flying around and LANDING ON a glacier on Mt. McKinley and did a walk-about ON the tallest mountain on the North American continent - answered prayer, thank you Lord), a 1956 Beaver Sea plane (air tour of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada), and a helicopter (flying to Mendenhall Glacier for a dog sled ride)...dog sled, zipline, river boat, rubber boat, ship, trains, buses, automobile, and horseback riding.

First, sell your car that doesn't run and put the money in your pocket now . At the least, it can go towards airfare.

Second, fly into Fairbanks . You could fly into Anchorage and then drive to Fairbanks, that's doable. However; driving from N.J. is NOT an option because Alaska has a LOT of WILDERNESS and when I say WILDERNESS I MEAN WILDERNESS AS FAR AS THE EYE CAN SEE AND BEYOND ~ HORIZON-TO-HORIZON WILDERNESS...and a good chance that NO HUMAN footprint has touched. Sure wouldn't want to get stranded out there now would ya!!

Third, to bring a car from the "lower 48" to Alaska means a ferry ride that's not cheap. However; all vehicles (individually owned or from a dealership) have a transport fee because they need to be brought in by a boat of some kind. Check with AAA about buying a car in Anchorage or Fairbanks. If you don't have AAA, maybe you know someone who does...or maybe your local office would be kind and offer complimentary advice.

Fourth, Alaskan's in general are a very relaxed and nice people. Getting "dressed up" means wearing your nicest flannel shirt, or T-shirt, and jeans. Very, very casual there! I recommend that you purchase some NEGATIVE "0" outer clothing for the NEGATIVE 50+, and with wind chill NEGATIVE 80+, winter weather. The higher the negative number you can get for clothing the better and warmer you'll be. I suggest Land's End, LL Bean, Patagonia, and North Face for starters. Long underwear is a great investment too, silk is the best only it's expensive so check out Cuddle Duds (they are for men and women)! Don't forget wool socks and the thinsulate socks (like silk long underwear for your feet that wick moisture away) underneath ~ the combination of wool and thinsulate will keep your feet warm and dry 'cause when your feet get cold/wet your whole body is miserable. The summers there are nice, but still layer your clothing.

Fifth, for housing ask if the company you're interviewing with has corporate housing (a business contracts apartments for their employees who are transitioning from a different area/state) or if they have housing suggestions. When you want to know something ask the locals!

Sixth, heating bills will be expensive and youíll probably want to sit down before you open your first bill ~ lol. Youíll want to watch what you set the thermostat to, but donít let yourself freeze either. Oh yeah, because of the salt or mag-chloride or whatever they use to de-ice the roads cars and trucks get rusty a lot quicker. And that thing you plug your car into, itís called a block heater. You attach it to your engine block and then plug it into the electrical socket in your garage or at your apartment complex to keep your engine from freezing and not starting. ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS ~ KEEP AN EMERGENCY KIT IN YOUR CAR (including change of clothes, underwear, shoes/boots, blanket, pillow, big trash bags {used as rain coat, windbreaker, gathering water from rain, etc}, and the usual roadside emergency tools including a flashlight, pliers, screwdrivers, shovel, cat litter {use in place of sand when stuck on ice}, reflective something {i.e. CD/DVD or mirror to shine against the sun to signal for help}, and a GPS device). Better to be prepared and never have to use it than to need it just one time and not have itÖdonít want to die out there now would ya!!

And lastly, ENJOY THE ADVENTURE!! ALASKA IS AWESOME AND WONDERFUL AND ITíS AS CLOSE TO HEAVEN YOUíLL SEE THIS SIDE OF THE PEARLY GATES!! Itís truly a God experience that shouldnít be missed!!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2012, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,862 posts, read 11,777,534 times
Reputation: 6296
Quote:
Originally Posted by finernfrogfur View Post
Oh yeah, because of the salt or mag-chloride or whatever they use to de-ice the roads cars and trucks get rusty a lot quicker.
Alaska only uses enough liquid magnesium chloride to keep the sand from freezing solid, and it is 70% less corrosive than salt (sodium chloride). We do not use salt on the roads like most other northern States.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2012, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Birmingham, Alabama
1,976 posts, read 1,933,684 times
Reputation: 1139
Quote:
Originally Posted by finernfrogfur View Post
Third, to bring a car from the "lower 48" to Alaska means a ferry ride that's not cheap. However; all vehicles (individually owned or from a dealership) have a transport fee because they need to be brought in by a boat of some kind.
Not if you're going to Fairbanks. There's a highway called the ALCAN (Alaska Highway or Alaska-Canada Highway) that will take you clean up to Delta Junction, at which point you can take the Richardson to Fairbanks. Not trying to be contrary, but it should be pointed out that you don't always have to put your car on a boat. That's mostly if you're going somewhere in SE or if you're moving to the bush, or in other words, places not on the road system.

Glitch and gobrien both wrote very helpful stuff here though. I'm really just making a little quibble.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Alaska > Fairbanks
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top