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Old 10-24-2010, 07:02 PM
 
72 posts, read 119,305 times
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I was recently in the airport, and I couldn't help but notice the countless number of magazines with white women. I did not see any magazine's besides Oprah and Essence with black faces gracing the cover. Sadly, young black girls will not get the opportunity to see themselves represented, and young black boys will continue to be socialized to believe that other races of women (primarily white) are prettier and more valuable. It's extremely disturbing.

For this reason, I really take issue with the idea that black magazines such as Essence are discriminatory, since they cater to blacks. Without this magazine, black women would NOT be represented at all. Do whites really think it's fair that other races of women have 0 representation? I guess, most do not care.

On another note, as a dark woman, I often find it difficult to find foundation which matches my skin color. I once mentioned this to a CVS store manager, and he kindly informed me that I was shopping in a mostly white area, so the makeup is intended to cater to white women.

Interestingly however, when I shop in black neighborhoods, I notice that there's always a plethora of makeup available in almost every shade for white women (despite the relatively low/non existent number of white women in the community). This issue really bothers me. Why is it that even in all black areas, there's ample foundation colors and makeup available for white women?

 
Old 10-24-2010, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 30,618,996 times
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I dont know where you're shopping, but everywhere I buy makeup has plenty of hue diversity.
 
Old 10-24-2010, 07:15 PM
 
72 posts, read 119,305 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
I dont know where you're shopping, but everywhere I buy makeup has plenty of hue diversity.
I mostly shop at CVS, Duane Reade, and Walgreens. Typically, these stores do not have ample shades of makeup for black women. If you are searching for darker shades, you will have great difficulties.
 
Old 10-24-2010, 07:18 PM
 
Location: North of the border!
662 posts, read 1,042,261 times
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I was curious so I checked US census figures. Approx 80% of the US population is white, 13% black, Asians 5%. Are magazine covers that far off? I think if you took the covers with Obama and Oprah (accounting for total sales) on them it would be pretty close to the actual demographics.
 
Old 10-24-2010, 07:21 PM
 
783 posts, read 1,869,993 times
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What about Bazaar and Vogue? They don't feature women of color every month on the cover, but they do have quite a palette.

Perhaps the problem starts before the magazines? If there are fewer black models to choose from, there are going to be fewer to choose for magazine covers. Plus, models like Kate Moss are STILL going strong and those sorts of models are still going to get a good percentage of the covers.

You know, some of it's going to come down to style as well: lighting can make a dark model look very light, to the point she doesn't even "stand out" on the cover as a darker model.

 
Old 10-24-2010, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 30,618,996 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eboni_Kisses26 View Post
I mostly shop at CVS, Duane Reade, and Walgreens. Typically, these stores do not have ample shades of makeup for black women. If you are searching for darker shades, you will have great difficulties.
I just went onto the Walgreens site, and they have a cool tool to find makeup in the stores based on your zip code.
Also, do you have any Ulta stores in your area?
Love that place, they have everything, in all skin tones.
Ulta.com - Cosmetics, Fragrance, Salon and Beauty Gifts

Last edited by kshe95girl; 10-24-2010 at 07:36 PM..
 
Old 10-24-2010, 07:32 PM
 
72 posts, read 119,305 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poptones View Post
What about Bazaar and Vogue? They don't feature women of color every month on the cover, but they do have quite a palette.

Perhaps the problem starts before the magazines? If there are fewer black models to choose from, there are going to be fewer to choose for magazine covers. Plus, models like Kate Moss are STILL going strong and those sorts of models are still going to get a good percentage of the covers.

You know, some of it's going to come down to style as well: lighting can make a dark model look very light, to the point she doesn't even "stand out" on the cover as a darker model.
3 out of hundreds of covers with white women is far from 'equal representation.' For this reason, I strongly support Magazines such as Essence and Ebony.
 
Old 10-24-2010, 07:36 PM
 
72 posts, read 119,305 times
Reputation: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishouldknow View Post
I was curious so I checked US census figures. Approx 80% of the US population is white, 13% black, Asians 5%. Are magazine covers that far off? I think if you took the covers with Obama and Oprah (accounting for total sales) on them it would be pretty close to the actual demographics.
According to your logic, having two black people on magazine covers is 'pretty close to the actual demographics.' I won't even comment on such an asinine statement.
 
Old 10-24-2010, 07:37 PM
 
783 posts, read 1,869,993 times
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I had a GF who worked as a model. I looked for a pic to show you, but I can't find it right now. Anyway, in the picture she is about the color of Rhianna up there, but in real life she was a good bit darker. I can also tell you that working with darker models can be a challenge because of the contrasts. Even in other nations fair skin tends to be valued more highly and it's in large part because of the fashion industry. Is this a conspiracy against darker women? It's not just that - it's a lot harder to make a good composition given that you HAVE to use certain colors and garments in a shot. You have to make a shot that's going to grab the most eyeballs, and you cannot change everyone's sensibilities with a wish.

Essence, O, and Ebony usually have covers about someone. Fashion magazines usually have covers about something. It's not a direct comparison.
 
Old 10-24-2010, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Retirementland
1,234 posts, read 2,396,433 times
Reputation: 829
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eboni_Kisses26 View Post
3 out of hundreds of covers with white women is far from 'equal representation.' For this reason, I strongly support Magazines such as Essence and Ebony.
They didn't say it was equal, they just said that those magazines do feature black models from time to time.

White models are featured much more often than models of other races. I won't argue with that. But I wouldn't go so far as to say "do whites think..." considering that we don't all get together every Tuesday to pick out the models for magazines. It's called the fashion industry. If the model they want for that shoot is white, then that's how it's gonna be.
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