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Old 01-17-2011, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Arizona
1,034 posts, read 3,732,538 times
Reputation: 1346

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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
I would be cautious about applying "treatment" products to oily skin, and make sure it's not perpetuating the problem. Here's what I mean:

Sebum is naturally secreted by glands in the skin, to protect the skin from damage. This is what people refer to as "oil." It's not really oil, it's a waxy secretion. It comes up through the pores. If the pores are clogged, the oil builds up underneath, and erupts as a zit. If there's an infection beneath the surface, it erupts as an oozy acne zit.

If you attempt to -remove- the oil through harsh chemicals (such as salicylic acid, aka aspirin), then your oil glands will do something akin to freaking out. They'll say, "LET US MAKE MOAR!" and they'll produce MORE oil to make up for the loss. That's in addition to the usual, healthy amount they produce. So you end up with oily skin that is bad enough you need to "do" something about it, which causes your skin to become more oily, which requires you to do something about it again, and so on and so forth.

What you might try first, before going the medicated/treatment route (I mean even just cosmetic counter skin care for acne-prone people), would be to follow sound cleansing techniques.

1. Wash your HANDS. Putting dirty hands on your face when it's cleaning time is going to just make matters worse.
2. Use a gentle, UNscented, UNmedicated cleansing cream (you're gonna rinse this off - why would you want to pay for it to be medicated?) and slightly warm water (never use hot water if you're acne prone).
3. Do NOT use a skin scrub. Massage the cream onto your skin, then rinse it off thoroughly.
4. Rinse again, with cooler water. Then let the air dry your face.

Flip your pillow over every other night, and change your pillowcase every other night.

If you use hairspray or gel or other hair treatments applied after washing, use a cotton ball with warm water to wipe any residue from the hair treatments off your face.

USE moisturizer. Oily skin needs moisturizer too and if your skin is too dehydrated, it will produce more oil to compensate for the lack of water. You can use an oil-free moisturizer, but the most important things to avoid are synthetic oils and perfumes, and animal fats. So no petroleum/petrolatum/mineral oil, no lanolin, no emu oil. If the ingredients list the word "fragrance" then it means synthetic perfume. If they list "essential oil of..." "infusion of..." or "...hydrosol" then it's a natural plant-derived scent and should be fine (in some cases it's actually beneficial, as in lavender or patchouli).

If these things don't show an improvement within a couple of weeks, then you'd know you might benefit from some of the medicated products on the market. I'd totally go the "clean and moisturize" route first though.
^^^^ Yes, yes, yes to everything here. I thought my whole life I had oily skin until I was told during a facial that I actually have dry skin that I dry out further and make it appear more oily. I was using so many harsh treatments on my skin, that my skin was retaliating and creating more oil to combat the drying chemicals.

I also second the recommendation above to use mineral make-up. My brand of choice is Jane Iredale, which I order on eBay. It costs about $40 and lasts me about 4 - 5 months. It does not clog my pores and wears beautifully. It may be trial and error with finding the right color for you, but samples are offered online at reasonable rates.
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Old 01-17-2011, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Balt / DC / ATL / SF / Seattle
292 posts, read 1,019,900 times
Reputation: 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
I would be cautious about applying "treatment" products to oily skin, and make sure it's not perpetuating the problem. Here's what I mean:

Sebum is naturally secreted by glands in the skin, to protect the skin from damage. This is what people refer to as "oil." It's not really oil, it's a waxy secretion. It comes up through the pores. If the pores are clogged, the oil builds up underneath, and erupts as a zit. If there's an infection beneath the surface, it erupts as an oozy acne zit.

If you attempt to -remove- the oil through harsh chemicals (such as salicylic acid, aka aspirin), then your oil glands will do something akin to freaking out. They'll say, "LET US MAKE MOAR!" and they'll produce MORE oil to make up for the loss. That's in addition to the usual, healthy amount they produce. So you end up with oily skin that is bad enough you need to "do" something about it, which causes your skin to become more oily, which requires you to do something about it again, and so on and so forth....
This is very good information and suggestions, but it's not cut and dried as "you have oily skin because you use harsh cleansers." Some people have oily skin. I do. Everyone in my family does in varying degrees, and as long as it's treated well, it looks beautiful. If you have a problem with acne, go to a doctor. There is just more than the harshness of products that affects what your skin does. The turnover rate of skin, how well that skin is exfoliated, etc., all come into play. I've been prone to blackheads and acne since I was 10 years old and learned that my skin overturns quickly but cannot shed itself in time to prevent sebum from creating blackheads. At age 41, I have no wrinkles around my eyes and barely look 30, and if that's what I have to shoulder for having oily skin, then so be it.

Also, to the poster that was told about her skin during a facial: getting skin diagnoses from an esthetician is like getting financial help via email from a Nigerian prince. They are not trained to dispense anything other than cosmetic information; they are not medical professionals. If you had severe dandruff, would you go to a hairdresser? No, you'd see a dermatologist. Not trying to be harsh here, but keep in mind that there is a difference between a person trained to dispense cosmetic advice (and receives commission on product sales) and a trained medical professional.
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Old 01-17-2011, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Arizona
1,034 posts, read 3,732,538 times
Reputation: 1346
Quote:
Originally Posted by OrangeCoriander View Post
Also, to the poster that was told about her skin during a facial: getting skin diagnoses from an esthetician is like getting financial help via email from a Nigerian prince. They are not trained to dispense anything other than cosmetic information; they are not medical professionals.
^^^ Agreed here except my facial followed a series of photo (laser) facials for the treatment of rosacea. They were peformed in the office of a dermatologist and I was under his care. He actually concured on my skin type. So I guess it would be more effective to say, "per my dermatologist..." vs. "per my esthetician."
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Old 01-17-2011, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Coffee Bean
655 posts, read 1,510,202 times
Reputation: 803
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
I would be cautious about applying "treatment" products to oily skin, and make sure it's not perpetuating the problem. Here's what I mean:

Sebum is naturally secreted by glands in the skin, to protect the skin from damage. This is what people refer to as "oil." It's not really oil, it's a waxy secretion. It comes up through the pores. If the pores are clogged, the oil builds up underneath, and erupts as a zit. If there's an infection beneath the surface, it erupts as an oozy acne zit.

If you attempt to -remove- the oil through harsh chemicals (such as salicylic acid, aka aspirin), then your oil glands will do something akin to freaking out. They'll say, "LET US MAKE MOAR!" and they'll produce MORE oil to make up for the loss. That's in addition to the usual, healthy amount they produce. So you end up with oily skin that is bad enough you need to "do" something about it, which causes your skin to become more oily, which requires you to do something about it again, and so on and so forth.

What you might try first, before going the medicated/treatment route (I mean even just cosmetic counter skin care for acne-prone people), would be to follow sound cleansing techniques.

1. Wash your HANDS. Putting dirty hands on your face when it's cleaning time is going to just make matters worse.
2. Use a gentle, UNscented, UNmedicated cleansing cream (you're gonna rinse this off - why would you want to pay for it to be medicated?) and slightly warm water (never use hot water if you're acne prone).
3. Do NOT use a skin scrub. Massage the cream onto your skin, then rinse it off thoroughly.
4. Rinse again, with cooler water. Then let the air dry your face.

Flip your pillow over every other night, and change your pillowcase every other night.

If you use hairspray or gel or other hair treatments applied after washing, use a cotton ball with warm water to wipe any residue from the hair treatments off your face.

USE moisturizer. Oily skin needs moisturizer too and if your skin is too dehydrated, it will produce more oil to compensate for the lack of water. You can use an oil-free moisturizer, but the most important things to avoid are synthetic oils and perfumes, and animal fats. So no petroleum/petrolatum/mineral oil, no lanolin, no emu oil. If the ingredients list the word "fragrance" then it means synthetic perfume. If they list "essential oil of..." "infusion of..." or "...hydrosol" then it's a natural plant-derived scent and should be fine (in some cases it's actually beneficial, as in lavender or patchouli).

If these things don't show an improvement within a couple of weeks, then you'd know you might benefit from some of the medicated products on the market. I'd totally go the "clean and moisturize" route first though.
Wow. That's awesome info, and I'm pretty much doing EVERYTHING you suggest not to do (harsh cleansers, over-cleaning, super hot water... the works).

Looks like I need to expand my plan to more than just makeup - makes sense.

Thanks!!
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Old 01-21-2011, 08:37 PM
 
Location: PNW
682 posts, read 2,048,046 times
Reputation: 631
My skin is also naturally oily, as is my mother's.

Not everyone reacts the same way to the same treatments, so it's hard to dispense advice, but I have a very simple regimen of Oil of Olay daily face wash for Oily/Combination skin and Neutrogena Skin Clearing foundation. I clean it all off at night with Costco pre-moistened towlettes, or Oil of Olay towlettes (Costco is cheaper ). If I need a toner I just use simple witch hazel, available at drug stores. The last thing that helps enormously is living in the Pacific Northwest and the lack of sunshine to damage my skin.

As others have stated, there are benefits to having oily skin too (e.g. fewer wrinkles). My dermatologist said to me, "You need to tell me what you're doing because your skin is beautiful. Don't change anything."
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Old 03-01-2011, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque
2,294 posts, read 5,465,037 times
Reputation: 1085
Revlon Colorstay over primer & set with a little loose translucent powder rolled across the face with a powder puff. I think the Laura Mercier method of applying foundation is ideal for all skin types.
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Old 03-01-2011, 03:13 PM
 
32,538 posts, read 29,346,221 times
Reputation: 32238
Quote:
Originally Posted by figmalt View Post
Oil of Olay towlettes
Oh my goodness, I love those!
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