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Old 09-26-2007, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Porstmouth, Virginia (Old Towne Section)
59 posts, read 431,523 times
Reputation: 76

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Hello! I am currently putting together a business plan to get funding in order to open up a dreadlock salon here in Virginia. For statistical purposes, if you have dreadlocks or are considering getting dreadlocks please answer the following survey questions for me?

1. Do you think that there is a need for an all dreadlocking salon?
2. What would you look for in a dreadlock salon?

Thanks for participating!
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Old 09-26-2007, 11:15 PM
 
1,005 posts, read 1,387,292 times
Reputation: 656
Hi Kisimone -

I hope this will help. I am a licensed hairdresser & have worked with all sorts of extensions & cornrows but not dreadlocks. In Boston, I know of 4 places that do extensions & dreadlocks, but not dreadlocks exclusively. There may be more salons or mobile salons, but I'm not aware of them.

Is there a need? Since this style is mainly popular in the black community (in the northeast, at least), I think a local shop where the % of black men/women is high, would be your best location, but I'm sure you already know this. I've also seen a handful of 20-something white men/women who live in parts of town where college students/musicians are prevalant, but this probably wouldn't be the bulk of a dreadlock clientele. Just mentioning it as it may be a demographic for you to market to.

What I've heard from friends who've have dreadlocks (I've known 4 - 1 white woman, 3 black women) is if they were mothers, they all preferred to have someone come to their homes. This is easy in MA as the Board allows mobile salons, so perhaps this could be an extension service (no pun intended) for some of your clients with children, if VA allows mobile salons. They all indicated they'd easily pay more for this service.

Interesting, too, is if they had to go to a salon, they jumped ship easily if they found a cheaper price, even if it meant going to a hairdresser who worked out of her home in what was probably not a Board certified location. I guess they felt if they were inconvenienced by having to leave home (traffic, parking fees, bringing children or trying to find parking) then they searched for the best deal. If it were convenient (the hairdresser came to them), then they'd pay more.

What would someone look for? I think a book of testimonials would be great. In many states, the biggest complaint to hairboards is lost hair/bald patches from improperly applied extensions. This is particularly true in FL, as you need only a hairbraider's license to do extensions (250-hrs) & don't need to be a licensed hairdresser. The state no longer allows licensure for new hairbraiders, due to this. A book of photos (clients can be anonymous if taken from the back of the head) & a testimonial letter (with just initials to keep their names private, if they prefer) would be a comforting way to assuage the fears of those who've had bad service in the past or are new clients for this service. I realize dreadlocks may not put the same stress on hair, but sometimes adhesives are used & additional hair can be added & a client may still have fears.

Good luck with your new venture. I hope it's very successful for you... VV
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Old 09-27-2007, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Porstmouth, Virginia (Old Towne Section)
59 posts, read 431,523 times
Reputation: 76
Wow, your information is going to be very helpful. Thanks so much !!
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Old 03-31-2008, 10:50 AM
 
1 posts, read 22,387 times
Reputation: 12
Hey there! I was just wondering if you ever opened up your dreadlock salon? If so, where are you located? I have just started dreads and my husband works so much, he doesn't have time to work on them...would be interested in being your customer. Thanks!
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Old 03-31-2008, 11:05 AM
 
Location: America
6,979 posts, read 15,128,558 times
Reputation: 2059
Quote:
Originally Posted by kisimone View Post
Hello! I am currently putting together a business plan to get funding in order to open up a dreadlock salon here in Virginia. For statistical purposes, if you have dreadlocks or are considering getting dreadlocks please answer the following survey questions for me?

1. Do you think that there is a need for an all dreadlocking salon?
2. What would you look for in a dreadlock salon?

Thanks for participating!
I have locks so let me take the survey.

1. no I do not think it should be all dreadlocking salon. ONLY because that limits you as a business owner. I would say do all hair styles, will increase your profitability.

2. I make sure the person who does my hair HAS dreadlocks. The person needs to use ALL natural products and have healthy looking hair. The person should also be a certified loctician (I think thats the name).

Store should be clean, aesthetically pleasing and I should not have to listen to customers or those doing hair use filthy language (this is a problem in some places).
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Old 03-31-2008, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Jersey in da Citi!!
874 posts, read 3,356,520 times
Reputation: 473
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baltic_Celt View Post
Hi Kisimone -

I hope this will help. I am a licensed hairdresser & have worked with all sorts of extensions & cornrows but not dreadlocks. In Boston, I know of 4 places that do extensions & dreadlocks, but not dreadlocks exclusively. There may be more salons or mobile salons, but I'm not aware of them.

Is there a need? Since this style is mainly popular in the black community (in the northeast, at least), I think a local shop where the % of black men/women is high, would be your best location, but I'm sure you already know this. I've also seen a handful of 20-something white men/women who live in parts of town where college students/musicians are prevalant, but this probably wouldn't be the bulk of a dreadlock clientele. Just mentioning it as it may be a demographic for you to market to.

What I've heard from friends who've have dreadlocks (I've known 4 - 1 white woman, 3 black women) is if they were mothers, they all preferred to have someone come to their homes. This is easy in MA as the Board allows mobile salons, so perhaps this could be an extension service (no pun intended) for some of your clients with children, if VA allows mobile salons. They all indicated they'd easily pay more for this service.

Interesting, too, is if they had to go to a salon, they jumped ship easily if they found a cheaper price, even if it meant going to a hairdresser who worked out of her home in what was probably not a Board certified location. I guess they felt if they were inconvenienced by having to leave home (traffic, parking fees, bringing children or trying to find parking) then they searched for the best deal. If it were convenient (the hairdresser came to them), then they'd pay more.

What would someone look for? I think a book of testimonials would be great. In many states, the biggest complaint to hairboards is lost hair/bald patches from improperly applied extensions. This is particularly true in FL, as you need only a hairbraider's license to do extensions (250-hrs) & don't need to be a licensed hairdresser. The state no longer allows licensure for new hairbraiders, due to this. A book of photos (clients can be anonymous if taken from the back of the head) & a testimonial letter (with just initials to keep their names private, if they prefer) would be a comforting way to assuage the fears of those who've had bad service in the past or are new clients for this service. I realize dreadlocks may not put the same stress on hair, but sometimes adhesives are used & additional hair can be added & a client may still have fears.

Good luck with your new venture. I hope it's very successful for you... VV
Hi Kisimone,

You seem to very informative. I just moved to Orlando, FL from New Jersey and am in desperate need of finding a hairsalon that specializes in haircare as well as the latest hair styles. I wear weaves..all sorts, curly, straight, long, short..love the different looks. Can you advise me of any upscale salons in the Orlando area? I havent seen not one sister with a banging hair do..
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Old 03-31-2008, 10:04 PM
 
1,670 posts, read 5,694,495 times
Reputation: 1178
Post this on VA forum, you will get a larger response.

Your salon must do natural hair only to function, natural cuts, braids, locs, fros, twists and press optional. This will give you a broader audience. Locs although pricey do not create the repeat clientele for most. Every salon must be clean, neat and ran like a professional business. In NYC, locs works because many people wear them, I don't see as much locs in VA.
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Old 06-05-2008, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Rochester Hills, MI
578 posts, read 2,306,469 times
Reputation: 300
Has anybody ever gotten info on what a dreadlock actually LOOKS LIKE UNDER A MICROSCOPE? since it is formed by "leaving it alone" (most of the time) then it has to have a number of biohazards, life forms dwelling, laying eggs in it? I know those who have dreads will say: "NO way"....but anybody have any REAL PROOF, or seen it under a microscope? dust, dander, mites, etc. HAVE GOT TO BE DWELLING THERE.
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Old 07-29-2008, 12:02 PM
 
1 posts, read 20,916 times
Reputation: 10
Default Where in Boston

Hi,
Can you tell me where the 4 are in Boston? I'm looking for extensions to my dreadlocks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Baltic_Celt View Post
Hi Kisimone -

I hope this will help. I am a licensed hairdresser & have worked with all sorts of extensions & cornrows but not dreadlocks. In Boston, I know of 4 places that do extensions & dreadlocks, but not dreadlocks exclusively. There may be more salons or mobile salons, but I'm not aware of them.

Is there a need? Since this style is mainly popular in the black community (in the northeast, at least), I think a local shop where the % of black men/women is high, would be your best location, but I'm sure you already know this. I've also seen a handful of 20-something white men/women who live in parts of town where college students/musicians are prevalant, but this probably wouldn't be the bulk of a dreadlock clientele. Just mentioning it as it may be a demographic for you to market to.

What I've heard from friends who've have dreadlocks (I've known 4 - 1 white woman, 3 black women) is if they were mothers, they all preferred to have someone come to their homes. This is easy in MA as the Board allows mobile salons, so perhaps this could be an extension service (no pun intended) for some of your clients with children, if VA allows mobile salons. They all indicated they'd easily pay more for this service.

Interesting, too, is if they had to go to a salon, they jumped ship easily if they found a cheaper price, even if it meant going to a hairdresser who worked out of her home in what was probably not a Board certified location. I guess they felt if they were inconvenienced by having to leave home (traffic, parking fees, bringing children or trying to find parking) then they searched for the best deal. If it were convenient (the hairdresser came to them), then they'd pay more.

What would someone look for? I think a book of testimonials would be great. In many states, the biggest complaint to hairboards is lost hair/bald patches from improperly applied extensions. This is particularly true in FL, as you need only a hairbraider's license to do extensions (250-hrs) & don't need to be a licensed hairdresser. The state no longer allows licensure for new hairbraiders, due to this. A book of photos (clients can be anonymous if taken from the back of the head) & a testimonial letter (with just initials to keep their names private, if they prefer) would be a comforting way to assuage the fears of those who've had bad service in the past or are new clients for this service. I realize dreadlocks may not put the same stress on hair, but sometimes adhesives are used & additional hair can be added & a client may still have fears.

Good luck with your new venture. I hope it's very successful for you... VV
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Old 07-29-2008, 01:55 PM
 
8,415 posts, read 34,319,158 times
Reputation: 6197
A dread is not formed by leaving its alone in a groomed dread.No white persons hair will ever form a nice dread. If you are afro amer the shape of the hair shaft naturally is hard for bugs to cling to. EVERYONE dreads or not is covered in skin mites etc. They even live in your eyelashes.

Anyway...

I think you should look at punky dreads too along with classic dreads if there is a market there for it. And dread extenstion. I agree that you should just make it a basic hair salon that specializes in dreading. The afro amer hair salon near me is ALWAYS busy because there are clients around that need someone who can work on afro amer hair in skilled ways such as dreading etc. Rather than just getting a trim or lined up like a conventional barber. Thier prices are a lot cheaper than trendy salons too. I think they do way better work as well.

1. Do you think that there is a need for an all dreadlocking salon?
I think you should look at salons in the area and ask how business is.

2. What would you look for in a dreadlock salon?
Clean, people wearing dreads, Nice book of work from stylists, Certification (lic.)
Able to buy classic and trendy dreading stuff. (like knotty boy)
Some nice little hair do dads for sale like band & hats for dreads.
A little print out on how to take care of your dreads after you get them.
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