U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Fashion and Beauty
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-10-2012, 07:44 AM
 
Location: US
5,145 posts, read 10,423,450 times
Reputation: 5326

Advertisements

I know how people love to rant on about thin models being unhealthy.

Here is the other side of the coin people are OPENLY embracing with the body acceptance movement taken to the extreme by some.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1386050/Mia-Amber-Davis-Road-Trip-Actress-plus-size-model-dies-36.html

Being overweight will do two things: Add damage to your knee or aggravate old injury and increase your chance of blood clots post surgery.

At the time of her having knee issues she was over 300 lbs.

Know what you are promoting as body acceptance is not always a good thing when people lose sight of reason and common sense.

I have to wonder if women like this don't lose weight to stay in touch with fans and to keep working within the image they have made marketable.

This girl was lovely and funny...Now she is gone.

Don't promote obesity and call it body acceptance.

There is a huge difference in accepting shallow flaws and accepting dangerous weights that damage the body. If you love yourself and your body you will take care if it. Not abuse it and call it acceptance.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-10-2012, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,164 posts, read 57,288,199 times
Reputation: 52030
I don't see where her weight caused the blood clot that caused her death (more than a year ago!) ... but whatever.

Anyone can form blood clots after surgery. There may have been other factors (was she using birth control pills?) that contributed toward the blood clot, either inherent or post-operatively.

And losing weight will not necessarily make an old knee injury magically go away. Trust me on that one.

I'm not saying that weighing 300 pounds is healthy; it's not (unless you're 8 feet tall). But did her weight contribute to her death? I can't say for sure, and neither can you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2012, 08:55 AM
 
Location: US
5,145 posts, read 10,423,450 times
Reputation: 5326

Blood clots have an INCREASED chance of happening when you are at that level of weight
. What IS, not whatever.

Of course anyone can form blood clots after surgery, but avoiding adding knee damage by tending to weight issues would of prevented the need for surgery. It has been shown that surgery vs. non-invasive treatment therapy through nutrition, weight control and physical therapy usually have the same outcome.

Losing weight is what you should do when you have a knee injury. Trust you? Why? Do you have a knee injury and what is it? Have you maintained a healthy lower weight for your height for years while doing therapy on the damage?

More on it:
Road Trip star Mia Amber Davis' widower sues doctors claiming birth control prescription caused lung blood clot death | Mail Online

"
He goes on to claim that when she went to a family practitioner on April 18 to complain about knee pain she was cleared for knee surgery despite a number of risk factors.
These included obesity, high blood cholestorol levels and the fact she was on Zenchent.

He claims the doctor 'should have advised [Mia] to eliminate some of her other risk factors prior to clearing her for the surgery"

Read more: Road Trip star Mia Amber Davis' widower sues doctors claiming birth control prescription caused lung blood clot death | Mail Online

Losing weight and PT worked for my work related injury. I will trust what I have been through myself and the risk of surgery in heavy people was one of the factors in my decision to go non-invasive.

I am sharing this so people can materialize some common sense and stop acting like obese bodies don't carry elevated risks.
Apparently you can't trust doctors to look out for you as in this case claims so you better know how to look out for yourself. She should of even been on that BC at her weight with her other health issues.

So her knee hurts...what 300+ lb person's knee DOESN'T hurt most of the time? She would rather risk surgery than use common sense and relieve some weight from it.

This post is for all the plus people who think its just safe to go ahead and risk it before trying other methods.

I can certainly say her weight combined with medications and health history led to her death. I find it unethical that doctors did not protect her from it. They just treated it like a customer service based industry of give them what they want more so that give them what they need.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2012, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,164 posts, read 57,288,199 times
Reputation: 52030
Quote:
Originally Posted by Opsimathia View Post
Have you maintained a healthy lower weight for your height for years while doing therapy on the damage?
Why, yes I have! And thanks for asking.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2012, 10:10 AM
 
3,517 posts, read 5,441,583 times
Reputation: 5566
Hm, I don't think you can say her weight was directly related to her death considering how many other factors could have been solely or partially responsible, but I do agree there are a lot of overweight and obese people in denial and they all seem to be online.

Can't tell you how many times I've heard someone online claim to be overweight or obese by BMI but be in perfect health. They apparently can all outrun any normal weight person, have normal HgbA1Cs, normal blood pressure, normal cholesterol levels, and they eat nothing but pure and organic foods. By the way they talk, you'd think obesity were the secret to immortality.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2012, 10:31 AM
Status: "Rocktober...well that was fast. :-(" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Fredericksburg, VA
10,289 posts, read 10,446,371 times
Reputation: 13239
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnexpectedError View Post
Hm, I don't think you can say her weight was directly related to her death considering how many other factors could have been solely or partially responsible, but I do agree there are a lot of overweight and obese people in denial and they all seem to be online.

Can't tell you how many times I've heard someone online claim to be overweight or obese by BMI but be in perfect health. They apparently can all outrun any normal weight person, have normal HgbA1Cs, normal blood pressure, normal cholesterol levels, and they eat nothing but pure and organic foods. By the way they talk, you'd think obesity were the secret to immortality.
I see the point you are making, and agree that a lot of people are perhaps not honest with themselves. Still, I would caution about using the BMI as a metric for overweight or obesity. It doesn't factor muscle mass. I am 5'7" and in pretty good physical condition. I weigh 170 lbs, and while I am no body builder, I am pretty lean and muscular. My BMI is 26.6, good enough to classify me as overweight. I realize that I probably sound like the kind of person you are describing, but I am not a case of someone being in denial.
I don't deny that many who are overweight may not be willing to acknowledge so. But I can't say I blame them if the metric everyone is using is the BMI.

Here's a link to a BMI calculator:
BMI Calculator | BMI Calculator for Females and Males
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2012, 11:05 AM
 
3,517 posts, read 5,441,583 times
Reputation: 5566
Quote:
Originally Posted by iknowftbll View Post
I see the point you are making, and agree that a lot of people are perhaps not honest with themselves. Still, I would caution about using the BMI as a metric for overweight or obesity. It doesn't factor muscle mass. I am 5'7" and in pretty good physical condition. I weigh 170 lbs, and while I am no body builder, I am pretty lean and muscular. My BMI is 26.6, good enough to classify me as overweight. I realize that I probably sound like the kind of person you are describing, but I am not a case of someone being in denial.
I don't deny that many who are overweight may not be willing to acknowledge so. But I can't say I blame them if the metric everyone is using is the BMI.

Here's a link to a BMI calculator:
BMI Calculator | BMI Calculator for Females and Males
Oh no, not at all. I'm the first to say that BMI isn't the best tool to assess health. I compare it to wikipedia: it's a good jumping off point but not something you want to quote on a term paper.

BMI leaves a lot of wiggle room and 26.6 is a borderline BMI as it is. If your BMI were 40, though, I'd call that too far into obesity range to wiggle. I'm talking bigger, people who openly admit they are fat and jiggly, and then claim they live perfectly healthy lifestyles and suffer no consequences from their weight.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2012, 11:11 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
8,738 posts, read 9,581,184 times
Reputation: 7502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Opsimathia View Post
I know how people love to rant on about thin models being unhealthy.

Here is the other side of the coin people are OPENLY embracing with the body acceptance movement taken to the extreme by some.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1386050/Mia-Amber-Davis-Road-Trip-Actress-plus-size-model-dies-36.html

Being overweight will do two things: Add damage to your knee or aggravate old injury and increase your chance of blood clots post surgery.

At the time of her having knee issues she was over 300 lbs.

Know what you are promoting as body acceptance is not always a good thing when people lose sight of reason and common sense.

I have to wonder if women like this don't lose weight to stay in touch with fans and to keep working within the image they have made marketable.

This girl was lovely and funny...Now she is gone.

Don't promote obesity and call it body acceptance.

There is a huge difference in accepting shallow flaws and accepting dangerous weights that damage the body. If you love yourself and your body you will take care if it. Not abuse it and call it acceptance.
who says she was 'lovely and funny?' You? What major movies have you seen her in besides playing a joke on Road Trip?

I don't know the woman and it's a shame she died and all but really I don't weight 300lbs and I don't weight 115lbs, either way it has nothing to do with this random woman and whatever her problem was.

if somebody doesn't care about their weight -- why the heck do you? Women are going to 'openly embrace' their bodies, regardless of whether or not you think they are 'acceptable.' This would make sense, seeing as it primarily affects the person living in that body.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2012, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
26,867 posts, read 28,145,186 times
Reputation: 25978
Most plus sized models are around a size 12-14. Not sure these are examples of extreme obesity.

Not everyone has the exact same definition of overweight. For some people overweight is 10 pounds, and for other people it is 100. There is definitely a happy medium, and being slightly overweight isn't really all that problematic -- if you are acting like a healthy person: eating well and exercising regularly. Being severely obese of course is something different. But health outcomes are significantly improved for anyone by adopting healthy habits, even if they remain at a high weight. And plenty of studies show, that risks for chronic disease are greatly reduced by losing 5-10% of your weight. Which everyone seems to agree is the easiest amount to maintain forever.

BMI is flawed, since there is a ton of evidence on how ideal BMI can vary between ethnic groups. Generally, Asian people should have a lower BMI threshold for each level since they have lower bone density, and African-Americans should have higher thresholds since we have higher bone densities. [http://www.bcm.edu/news/item.cfm?newsID=1383]
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2012, 11:21 AM
Status: "Rocktober...well that was fast. :-(" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Fredericksburg, VA
10,289 posts, read 10,446,371 times
Reputation: 13239
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnexpectedError View Post
Oh no, not at all. I'm the first to say that BMI isn't the best tool to assess health. I compare it to wikipedia: it's a good jumping off point but not something you want to quote on a term paper.

BMI leaves a lot of wiggle room and 26.6 is a borderline BMI as it is. If your BMI were 40, though, I'd call that too far into obesity range to wiggle. I'm talking bigger, people who openly admit they are fat and jiggly, and then claim they live perfectly healthy lifestyles and suffer no consequences from their weight.
I sort of figured, just wanted to make sure.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Fashion and Beauty
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top