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Old 07-30-2012, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,827 posts, read 39,461,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Of course how we feel about tattoos and actually anything is based on our age and how we were raised.

My father was a career Army Officer. He was born in 1915 and died in 1974. His father was the official tailor and uniform maker at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester, OK. My father had very anti tattoo attitude. What he saw in the penitentiary was of course the lowest of the low and not at all an art form. What he saw in the military was the result of a bunch of drunk sailors on shore leave.

I can't stand tattoos. I think they look cheap and creepy and now everybody looks like everybody else all inked up. I realize I am biased because of my age and my father's vocal responses to what he saw. I have 4 children, two of whom are grown. Thank God they have no interest in tatts and they know how I feel. My 30 year old PhD son is really turned off by them on women and says they all have the same butterfly in the small of their backs which look ridiculous.

I think it is a fad run amuck. Years ago Cher had some and she thought she was unique but when everybody and their brother (and sister) started getting the, she had hers erased. Not everybody can afford to erase the mistakes of their youth.

And the full facial tattoos are meant to frighten people and keep people at a distance. Very sad indeed.

My 2 cents worth.
Eh.

My dad hates tattoos, too.

Yet of his four children, three of us have them. No, we didn't get them to rebel, or prove something to our dad...we all get along great with him, and got them as adults. It's just a difference in taste. But, were it categorically true that attitudes one was raised with toward tattoos determines whether or not you get/like them, my brother, sister and I wouldn't have any. For all my dad's personal dislike of tattoos, the stronger message he raised us with was not to base what we do or don't do on other people's irrelevant opinions...including his own.
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Old 07-30-2012, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,827 posts, read 39,461,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jobless and Broke View Post
One of the biggest businesses now days is tattoo removal. But it is an expensive and painful process.
"Biggest," huh? As compared to what?
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Old 07-30-2012, 08:09 AM
 
Location: NoVa
18,434 posts, read 28,565,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
There is definitely a genration gap in terms of the "acceptableness" of tattoos. My mom thinks they are awful. She always says "they won't look good when you get old and fat."

Now, people without tattoos are almost in the minority for people under about 35. Probably a minority for the 18-25s.

As for the "professional" jobs? It depends a lot on your industry and unfortunately your ethnic group. If you are white, you can get away with a visible tattoo and no one will say much about it. If you are latino or black, good luck with that -- you probably won't even get the job. Most "ethnic" people I know keep them covered up to avoid being stereotypes.

When I was in my teens, I knew one guy with a tattoo. He went to a neighboring state (they were illegal for people under 18 or something in our state) and came back on Monday to show us his prized acquisition. A new Tweety Bird tattoo on his upper arm. He later went on to join the Marines, and is a state-level politician, aiming to move up higher. Not sure if he got more tattoos.

People get tattoos for different reasons: art, rebellion, to overcome painful memories, to start a new chapter in their lives, to become more attractive or something else. Just like every other way we manipulate our physical appearance.
This has got to be the biggest misconception EVER!

I am a white woman who works in the medical field. There was a black woman with tattooing on her forearm, as well as a Mexican man with one on his whole upper arm, and one on each of his forearms, and a black man with one on his forearm.

I looked over the employee handbook and nothing was said about tattoos at all. I talked to my manager about it and she said nothing about it. She was always looking at the one on my back, then when I got the one on my arm, she loved it.

I had too much of it showing once and got called into the principles office over it. Fine. Then another time. Fine as well. Not fine when it was ok for everyone else to have theirs showing at all times.

The white woman was singled out, the others were fine.
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Old 07-30-2012, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
26,896 posts, read 28,215,907 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pikantari View Post
This has got to be the biggest misconception EVER!

I am a white woman who works in the medical field. There was a black woman with tattooing on her forearm, as well as a Mexican man with one on his whole upper arm, and one on each of his forearms, and a black man with one on his forearm.

I looked over the employee handbook and nothing was said about tattoos at all. I talked to my manager about it and she said nothing about it. She was always looking at the one on my back, then when I got the one on my arm, she loved it.

I had too much of it showing once and got called into the principles office over it. Fine. Then another time. Fine as well. Not fine when it was ok for everyone else to have theirs showing at all times.

The white woman was singled out, the others were fine.
Not in my experience, but there could be regional variations too. I work in tech. It is pretty hard for your average latino or black male to even get in the door. Tech companies (in the startup phase) are super clique-y. Like a fraternity. They tend to hire like-minded people. Like-minded in social activities. So if you don't go skateboarding or mountain biking or skiing or rock climbing or whatever the activity of choice is they people don't think you'll fit in, so you don't really get hired. You might think the tattoos would give you "cred" with the company, but it doesn't seem to work that way. Or if you are trying to get VC funding? Not in your best interest. Since you already won't meet the "pattern" for success.

The stereotype? White people with tattoos: cool and alternative. Blacks and latinos with tattoos: criminals or gangbangers.
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Old 07-30-2012, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,827 posts, read 39,461,204 times
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An ex of mine, a massive guy of West African descent (first generation American, parents emigrated from Ghana), is a higher-up in environmental protection research with a governmental agency, and the fact that he has massive tattoos up and down his arms really didn't come into play in his getting his job right out of college, fresh with his biochem credentials. Given that he wears a long-sleeved button-up and tie to work every day, I'd imagine that the majority of his colleagues aren't even aware that he has any ink, unless they're among those who play basketball with him after hours. At any rate, working a nerdy government job since college graduation just SCREAMS gangbanger thug.

You are perceived according to the image you put forth, and in the current environment, rockstar credentials, a solid education, and proven professional track record more or less trump tattoos that are not even necessarily visible, from a workday perspective. I don't know anybody who's taken for a thug unless they are acting the part, ink or no ink.
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Old 07-30-2012, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
26,896 posts, read 28,215,907 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Given that he wears a long-sleeved button-up and tie to work every day, I'd imagine that the majority of his colleagues aren't even aware that he has any ink, unless they're among those who play basketball with him after hours. At any rate, working a nerdy government job since college graduation just SCREAMS gangbanger thug.
Absolutely. I know plenty of software developers with tats.

But I have also run into plenty of old school (older) people in the workforce who hate tats as well. It really depends on your audience. If you happen to run into upper class african-americans, they tend to be ultra conservative. So tats are definitely not allowed.

A few jobs ago I worked for Iranians immigrants. They were pretty conservative. The web guy had tattoos, and it was OK, because he didn't meet with outside clients or anything. But the management made it clear that for people in sales/marketing visible tattoos (and ear plugs, piercings) were not OK. They also tended to pigeonhole people based on the types of clothing they wore as well. They were pretty picky. Reminded me of old southerners in their attitudes.

In the Bay Area, wearing an actual button down to work would almost make you a weirdo, so people's tats are on display pretty readily. So everyone knows if you have a sleeve unless you wear long sleeves all the time. As much as people like to tell you that the tech industry is a meritocracy, it isn't the truth.
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Old 07-30-2012, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
7,658 posts, read 7,473,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay F View Post
Tattoos are the evidence. Only the lowest of the low such as outlaw bilkers and murderers had tattoos 25 years ago. Now everyone has them.

Bzzzzzzt. Try again.

Lots of military folks (and others, I'm sure), especially sailors, got tattooed. VERY few of which we're criminals, I'm certain. My grandfather got tattooed when he joined the Navy at 17 - which was 71 years ago. He's never been in trouble with the law in his life.

I'll ask again, do you have any *evidence* to back up your ridiculous claim?
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Old 07-30-2012, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,827 posts, read 39,461,204 times
Reputation: 48637
[quote=jade408;25405081]Absolutely. I know plenty of software developers with tats.

But I have also run into plenty of old school (older) people in the workforce who hate tats as well. It really depends on your audience. If you happen to run into upper class african-americans, they tend to be ultra conservative. So tats are definitely not allowed.

Eh, said ex comes from a conservative family. They don't necessarily approve of his tats, but he's pretty independent in his choices, and doesn't much care. Then again, they also didn't want him becoming a scientist, they wanted him in med school...he went this own way on that, too. Whether things are or aren't "allowed" in a family doesn't always draw a lot of water once offspring reaches adulthood...even in very family-centric cultures - especially when the offspring are significantly Americanized, compared to the parents. Case in point.

Quote:
A few jobs ago I worked for Iranians immigrants. They were pretty conservative. The web guy had tattoos, and it was OK, because he didn't meet with outside clients or anything. But the management made it clear that for people in sales/marketing visible tattoos (and ear plugs, piercings) were not OK. They also tended to pigeonhole people based on the types of clothing they wore as well. They were pretty picky. Reminded me of old southerners in their attitudes.

In the Bay Area, wearing an actual button down to work would almost make you a weirdo, so people's tats are on display pretty readily. So everyone knows if you have a sleeve unless you wear long sleeves all the time. As much as people like to tell you that the tech industry is a meritocracy, it isn't the truth.
Interestingly, as it happens, said ex IS, in fact, in the Bay area. Apparently, nobody told him or his fellow government employees that button-downs are for weirdos, they're actually dress code.
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Old 07-30-2012, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
26,896 posts, read 28,215,907 times
Reputation: 26044
Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
A
Eh, said ex comes from a conservative family. They don't necessarily approve of his tats, but he's pretty independent in his choices, and doesn't much care. Then again, they also didn't want him becoming a scientist, they wanted him in med school...he went this own way on that, too. Whether things are or aren't "allowed" in a family doesn't always draw a lot of water once offspring reaches adulthood...even in very family-centric cultures - especially when the offspring are significantly Americanized, compared to the parents. Case in point.



Interestingly, as it happens, said ex IS, in fact, in the Bay area. Apparently, nobody told him or his fellow government employees that button-downs are for weirdos, they're actually dress code.
Government still has a dress code! Amazing!

Tech company dress code is like hipster t-shirt or button down, jeans and trendy sneakers! I haven't worked at a place with an actual professional dress code in ages.

I'd be excited if people had to wear button downs. I never know what to wear to tech company client meetings. I am always in professional clothes and everyone else is in jeans!
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Old 07-30-2012, 11:53 PM
 
Location: Warren, OH
2,709 posts, read 3,140,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
"Biggest," huh? As compared to what?
As opposed to putting tattoos on? Maybe the give kick backs.
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