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Old 08-16-2012, 03:21 PM
 
Location: The Netherlands
2,942 posts, read 4,216,951 times
Reputation: 3401

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
Your eyes are amazing Mine are green with "bubbles" of other colors. They aren't like emeralds but they are very green.

How did you post that?
To be clear, that's not my eye in the picture. My eyes are darker and the ring around my pupil is more yellow but it shows pretty much what it looks like. When I was looking for pictures I found out that I'm not the only one with this 'problem', lol.

Yellow Ring Around Pupil? - Yahoo! Answers

Vision and Eye Disorders Forum - Yellow ring surrounding the pupil.

My pupils have a yellow ring around them

What does a thick yellow ring around the pupil of the eye mean? | ChaCha

Yellow ring around eye pupil?

Guess it's not as rare as I thought
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Old 08-17-2012, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Midwest
2,975 posts, read 4,267,661 times
Reputation: 1941
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pear Martini View Post
Wow! I had no idea Hilary wore blue contacts!!
Jeez...even with all of that effort Sarah Palan still looks better.




So is it just as sad and depressing when a woman with light hair or "dishwater" hair dyes her hair a rich brown, auburn, or even black? Because I see this all the time and it never bothers me as a natural brunette. People like to change their look up, and look at all of the unnatural looking brunettes out there. Celeb examples are Katy Perry and Megan Fox.


as far as black women go, I have to say one of the most beautiful woman I have seen since moving to Boston was a half black half white woman who had bronze skin skin, was 5'8", and had golden highlights. It was magnificent and that's coming from a straight woman.
well first of all she wasn't a black woman she was MIXED.

and the only way a 'black woman' can be beautiful to you is if she has visible white ancestry in her phenotype.

i am so sick of hearing that i am ugly because i don't have white features all the time
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Old 08-17-2012, 12:09 AM
 
11,423 posts, read 19,433,663 times
Reputation: 18119
Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
Ugh! don't even get me started on the "dishwater" thing! It seems like every woman who has very light brown to dark blond hair either goes totally blond, or they go darker.

There is definitely this bias out there against hair of that color, even worse than people claim the bias is against dark hair in favor of blond hair.

Look at the typical words used to describe that kind of hair:
--dishwater
--dirty-blond
--mousy
--ash

I think that color hair is so pretty! It catches the light in all different ways, and it usually has all kinds of subtle colors mixed in. But nearly every woman with that color hair changes it! If that were my natural color, I would play it up and love it! Yes, I still think it's sad when those women feel they have to go lighter or darker.
That's my hair color. Ashy dark blonde -- ash means cool. If I am not careful with color, my hair goes brassy. Which for someone with my coloring means golden. Looks ghastly on me. Ash can have golden strands, but the golden is not overwhelming.

I highlight my hair with a cap to hide the gray. It helps blend the gray in. I also don't take large chunks to color -- I use few strands, but through a lot of the cap's holes. I highlighted every six months or less when I was younger -- actually left it go natural most of the time, but the gray means I have to highlight and I highlight after every cut -- every four months now.

Hair color is like makeup -- it's meant to be fun. If it's not fun, why do it?
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Old 08-17-2012, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Center of the universe
24,757 posts, read 32,891,787 times
Reputation: 11780
It's not any standard of beauty that I follow.
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Old 08-17-2012, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Up North
3,404 posts, read 7,250,918 times
Reputation: 3036
Quote:
Originally Posted by nyanna View Post
well first of all she wasn't a black woman she was MIXED.

and the only way a 'black woman' can be beautiful to you is if she has visible white ancestry in her phenotype.

i am so sick of hearing that i am ugly because i don't have white features all the time
That was absolutely not what I was getting at. I was responding to someone who said black women who dye their hair blonde are sad/pathetic.


A lot of people who are considered black are mixed so why is it wrong that I point out the beauty of a mixed woman who happened to dye her hair blonde?

On another note, why in the United States is mullato considered derogatory? In Latin countries (and Miami which is 60% Latin or more) Mulatto is just a way to describe someone and it is not derogatory. Even in music, there are lyrics like "Oye Mullatta!" (Hey Mulatto woman!).

I didn't even know this was offensive until recently.
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Old 08-17-2012, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
26,864 posts, read 28,137,614 times
Reputation: 25975
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pear Martini View Post
On another note, why in the United States is mullato considered derogatory? In Latin countries (and Miami which is 60% Latin or more) Mulatto is just a way to describe someone and it is not derogatory. Even in music, there are lyrics like "Oye Mullatta!" (Hey Mulatto woman!).

I didn't even know this was offensive until recently.
Because in the US we decided there weren't "types" of black. Everyone was black, because of the one drop rule (no matter how distant the ancestry was). We eventually retired the related terms as well: octoroon, quadroon and whatever other ones we had.
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Old 08-17-2012, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Midwest
2,975 posts, read 4,267,661 times
Reputation: 1941
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pear Martini View Post
That was absolutely not what I was getting at. I was responding to someone who said black women who dye their hair blonde are sad/pathetic.


A lot of people who are considered black are mixed so why is it wrong that I point out the beauty of a mixed woman who happened to dye her hair blonde?

On another note, why in the United States is mullato considered derogatory? In Latin countries (and Miami which is 60% Latin or more) Mulatto is just a way to describe someone and it is not derogatory. Even in music, there are lyrics like "Oye Mullatta!" (Hey Mulatto woman!).

I didn't even know this was offensive until recently.
yeah cause all black women are mixed and lightskin. darkskin unmixed afro featured black women like me are invisible and the ugly ones

whatever
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Old 08-17-2012, 03:43 PM
 
Location: La lune et les étoiles
17,413 posts, read 18,272,289 times
Reputation: 18588
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pear Martini View Post
That was absolutely not what I was getting at. I was responding to someone who said black women who dye their hair blonde are sad/pathetic.


A lot of people who are considered black are mixed so why is it wrong that I point out the beauty of a mixed woman who happened to dye her hair blonde?

On another note, why in the United States is mullato considered derogatory? In Latin countries (and Miami which is 60% Latin or more) Mulatto is just a way to describe someone and it is not derogatory. Even in music, there are lyrics like "Oye Mullatta!" (Hey Mulatto woman!).

I didn't even know this was offensive until recently.
Because the word mulatto basically means "mule" which is the hybrid offspring of a horse and a donkey.
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Old 08-17-2012, 03:51 PM
 
Location: La lune et les étoiles
17,413 posts, read 18,272,289 times
Reputation: 18588
Quote:
Originally Posted by nyanna View Post
yeah cause all black women are mixed and lightskin. darkskin unmixed afro featured black women like me are invisible and the ugly ones

whatever
You really need to just get over it, darling.

There are so MANY dark skinned Black women in this world who are celebrated for their beauty that you really have no excuse. Stop blaming your (self described) lack of attractiveness on your coloring and realize that it probably has much more to do with your attitude instead.

By the way, dark skinned beauty Naomi Campbell and her billionaire boyfriend (who just bought her a $18 million mansion) called to say called to say, "Wake up Nyanna! Dark skinned Black women all over the world are living beautiful lives and so can you"
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Old 08-17-2012, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Up North
3,404 posts, read 7,250,918 times
Reputation: 3036
Quote:
Originally Posted by calipoppy View Post
Because the word mulatto basically means "mule" which is the hybrid offspring of a horse and a donkey.

hmmm...interesting thanks
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