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Old 09-17-2013, 09:09 PM
 
1,745 posts, read 2,030,781 times
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I think it depends and don't like sweeping generalizations. There are good tats and bad ones. The good ones are well thought-out by someone of mature thinking and reflect that person accurately. The bad ones are usually impulsive, inspired by quick-fading trends, and look unoriginal. I have a small tat on my left upper inner forearm. It's very much a part of me and I waited over 12 years before actually taking the plunge. I will admit that it can be awkward in certain social situations, like at family gatherings in the summer LOL. But it's who I am. If they can't accept it then they certainly cannot accept me. It actually sometimes works as a filter, believe it or not, to weed out certain types. If someone if going to write you off for simply creatively expressing yourself... that says quite a bit more about them than you, don't you think? I would never get another one as I don't want to be an ink queen. Nor do I much care for larger ones, personally. I tend to think a small dose of discretion is a good thing.
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Old 09-17-2013, 11:50 PM
 
Location: Maryland
169 posts, read 639,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainrose View Post
In my generation, tattoos were regarded with a very negative stereotype. They represented ghetto, thugs, criminals, or a macho military type, or a low rider. It usually meant they were tough and not very educated.

I realize times have changed, but what is the deal with young girls getting all these tattoos? Is there now a POSITIVE stereotype with them? Does it reflect creativity, rebellion, sexuality? I see these attractive young girls and women with many visible tattoos, and some of them are educated, so has the negative stereotype vanished?

And while you are at it, could you explain the attraction to body piercings also!
Thanks

In your generation, tattoos were also taboo to a lot of countries. They were mainly done in Asia or Africa as a right of passage, if you will, or a symbol of strength. People fear new things. Hence the stereotype and the groups of people who quickly jumped on board.

But you said it perfectly...TIMES HAVE CHANGED! Tattooing has evolved dramatically. It's art and a form of expression for some. I don't think there's a positive stereotype with tattoo's but they have become mainstream. People get tattoo's for many reasons. Plenty still get them to look hardcore, like a thug. Some get them out of pure stupidity. Others to express spiritual beliefs or their love for somebody who has passed. People with tattoo's should not be looked down upon and considered uneducated.

Have you seen some of the tattoo artists out there? Their work looks like a painting on your skin! I love art and have always been creative. If I had the money, I would have full sleeves. Personally, I have 4 tattoo's. Nothing vulgar or offensive. My first I regret tremendously because it matches my sisters (except it's a different color) and we've never had a good relationship. Why did I choose that one? I'm not sure...probably because I was 16, lol. At least it can be covered up

The only tattoo's I have a problem with are facial tattoo's. To each their own but it's a bit much. I wouldn't think badly about people with them. I'd just think to myself well damn, I wouldn't do that! As for your other question about piercings; I don't have an answer for you. Ears, nose, lips, eyebrow and belly button are fine with me. I also think the ones that make dimples are cute on some people. Certain piercings are WAY out there though. The tongue, nipples and other nether regions are purely sexual in my opinion. I've also seen women getting little rhinestone piercings inbetween where their thumb and index finger is, on their lower back, near the collar bones. Almost anywhere! Those make no sense to me.
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Old 09-18-2013, 03:03 AM
 
Location: USA
6,171 posts, read 4,952,891 times
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I could see getting tattoos if i were a rockstar or served in special forces or something like that. But I can't see why a plain old average guy like me needs a ton of ink other than to "stand out" in some way.
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Old 09-18-2013, 03:05 AM
 
Location: Maryland
169 posts, read 639,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cocaseco View Post
Quite likely, but you missed the point. The question you should ask is if you, an inked up person, were to apply for a job with me, would I not hire you or otherwise treat you differently? The answer is yes. If I was in a hiring position, i wouldnt select you. If i were your teacher, I'd give you a lower grade and if i was your landlord, I'd pass on renting to you or charge you more, if i was your waiter, i'd spit in your food, if i was your parent I'd be super embarrased to be seen with you, if I was your child, I'd turn to drugs. The reason for all of this is that I would look at your tats and deem you a "loser" and want to either avoid you or reduce my exposure to you and your type.

WOW!!! "You and your type" are what's wrong with the world. Disgustingly judgemental and hateful! So you're telling me that if somebody (for example) has BEAUTIFULLY done tiger portraits, they're immediately a low class, hillbilly, white trash loser? Having an outlook like this shows you're a sad excuse for a human being.
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Old 09-18-2013, 06:18 AM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 14,724,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cocaseco View Post
Quite likely, but you missed the point. The question you should ask is if you, an inked up person, were to apply for a job with me, would I not hire you or otherwise treat you differently? The answer is yes. If I was in a hiring position, i wouldnt select you. If i were your teacher, I'd give you a lower grade and if i was your landlord, I'd pass on renting to you or charge you more, if i was your waiter, i'd spit in your food, if i was your parent I'd be super embarrased to be seen with you, if I was your child, I'd turn to drugs. The reason for all of this is that I would look at your tats and deem you a "loser" and want to either avoid you or reduce my exposure to you and your type.
And yet you're the one calling people with tattoos "losers"?
Oy vey.

You're not even worth the bother of a response, I'm afraid.
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Old 09-18-2013, 07:01 AM
 
1,006 posts, read 1,779,111 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockrchick View Post
WOW!!! "You and your type" are what's wrong with the world. Disgustingly judgemental and hateful! So you're telling me that if somebody (for example) has BEAUTIFULLY done tiger portraits, they're immediately a low class, hillbilly, white trash loser? Having an outlook like this shows you're a sad excuse for a human being.
So much for showing your ability to accept differing view points. Arent you also being judgemental? How is your closed mindedness any better than mine? It was an honest answer to the OP. If you think I'm an isolated case, you are seriously out of touch. Most just wont post it as coarsley as i will.

And yes, a tiger portrait would qualify.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
And yet you're the one calling people with tattoos "losers"?
Oy vey.

You're not even worth the bother of a response, I'm afraid.

Yet you did
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Old 09-18-2013, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Redmond, WA
559 posts, read 682,758 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
Your whole post was good but this made me LOL!

I got my first (of four) tattoos at age 21 and I am approaching wrinkly-age at age 55 and not only do I not regret it for a second, at my age quite frankly I am pretty much past worrying about how my older skin will look with tats. Older and perhaps wrinkled, but with a tattoo. *shrug*

And for those saying that it's de facto a sign of being "hillbilly" or "uneducated" or "low class" or whatever, phooie but you are wrong. A swastika on the forehead, obvious jail house ink, names on your neck, facial teardrops, sure. All tattoos make a statement and those statements can be tasteful and inoffensive (and easily hidden when need be) or offensive and indicative of time not-well-spent.

Anyway, I won't judge you for being too much of a lock-step conformist to NOT get a tattoo, as long as you don't judge me for getting one.

Speaking of judges, I know of one who has a tattoo. I also know two doctors (one a Navy veteran) with tattoos. I know an RN with a tattoo. I know an engineer (my ex husband) with a tattoo, and a physicist with a tattoo, and a philosophy professor (my brother) and a very high-powered advertising executive (my other brother) with a tattoo. That's just off the top of my head.... None of these people are criminals or uneducated.
Well I always personally looked at it as IF I make it to the age when I have wrinkly skin, that will be the last of my concerns. When that occurs I believe differs for everybody based on sun exposure throughout our lives, skin conditions, and overall care for our skin; but let's say for the sake of discussion that it's anything over 80, in my family that's a milestone and I will be pretty grateful if I can live to brag about it. If anything, I can go around "the home" showing everybody my colorful wrinkly skin along with my gummy smile. Hey, they might even hide the age spots that everybody else will be trying to cover up. Take THAT for apples!
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Old 09-18-2013, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Redmond, WA
559 posts, read 682,758 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cocaseco View Post
Well as us older folks die off, perhaps it won't matter. But the reality is that for now the Boomers are in positions of power and hiring and many, including myself, judge candidates on their tats. Two equal candidates and i simply wont hire they guy with the sleeve. Now they can scream all they want about that being closed minded, but it is what it is. SHallow? Maybe, but its the truth...it does make a negative impression for many people.
I think your getting a reaction from people on this thread because of your tone, it's coming off as elitist or 1%, and class warfare is a hot button issue these days. I'm picturing a booming voice from the sky "YOU WILL BE JUDGED"! Not to mention your example, most people HATE dealing with the person in the "position of power and hiring", often an HR manager. A major PITA to deal with and a barrier preventing people from getting to the real person they need to be talking to. Now we have to deal with personal prejudices on top of it?

Bummer.

As far as your hypothetical, I really don't care, I stopped worrying long ago about what an interviewer might like or not like about me, I ticked one off once because I was an hour early. Another was upset because I didn't carry an appointment book or some type of organizer. (I wonder what she'd have to say about my Iphone now? Better than about 5000 of her "organizers".)

Everything in life is subjective. A cutting edge fashion company might consider somebody with sleeves to be "with it" or "hip". While the suits of a Wall Street firm might view it as too bold. Thankfully there are a variety of employers to work for. I know my limits, I would never even consider one of the traditionally conservative professions like law or insurance. In Seattle, it was only in the last ten years that Safeco relaxed their dress code allowing something other than a button down white shirt (pressed please). But if the Harley plant was hiring they probably would be pleased to see their logo all over my body.

On a side note: I once worked for a major newspaper and the owner not only had the masthead tattooed on him, but he was willing to personally pay for anybody else willing to do so, and this guy is the sort that hosts dinner parties for senators, I know because I used to process his expense report and the "guest list" was attached.

Let me ask you this? If I can expand on your hypothetical, would you still not hire somebody if they could keep all their tattoos covered in the case of two unequal candidates? If they were the top candidate, why shoot yourself in the foot? Or what if your sleeved candidate had "connections" and capable of bringing in millions in new accounts? What would your bosses say about your personal feelings then? You might be overruled. Would you be forever scowling at this person? Or worse, undermining them every chance you get, sabotage even? Extremes I know, but zealotry can lead to all sorts of out of character behavior.

My point is that it's dangerous to deal in "absolutes". There are too many ifs, ands, or buts with every unique situation. Most of us know how the game is played, I'm old enough to know that all rules/policies can be bent if it means lining somebody's pockets. An employer can suddenly become your best friend when they find out about someone's distant relation to a Kennedy for instance. Or a Kauffman in Kansas City or a Benaroya in Seattle.

I'm gonna stop there because this is getting off topic, the OP wanted to hear from people, particularly women, with the tattoos, not from hiring managers, unless they are tattooed themselves. And if any HR directors are here, and you're inked, by all means. But it would make for a great debate in the employment forum where you'd probably find much more agreement to your position, this forum is going to have many more people interested in personal forms of expression.

Last edited by Garethe; 09-18-2013 at 10:33 AM.. Reason: sp
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Old 09-18-2013, 09:49 AM
 
811 posts, read 981,298 times
Reputation: 1432
Quote:
Originally Posted by Merc63 View Post
Again, you are proud of being closed minded, judgemental and ignorant. Do you like having limited mental abilites, or are you capable of learning to overcome them?

Hey, I figured since you started out being an insulting prick, I can at least return the favor.
Another grown man all riled up because of some internet opinion
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Old 09-18-2013, 10:11 AM
 
1,006 posts, read 1,779,111 times
Reputation: 1556
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garethe View Post
I think your getting a reaction from people on this thread because of your tone, it's coming off as elitist or 1%, and class warfare is a hot button issue these days. Not to mention your example, most people HATE dealing with the person in the "position of power and hiring", often an HR manager. A major PITA to deal with and a barrier preventing people from getting to the real person they need to be talking to. Now we have to deal with personal prejudices on top of it?

Bummer.

As far as your hypothetical, I really don't care, I stopped worrying long ago about what an interviewer might like or not like about me, I ticked one off once because I was an hour early. Another was upset because I didn't carry an appointment book or some type of organizer. (I wonder what she'd have to say about my Iphone now? Better than about 5000 of her "organizers".)

Everything in life is subjective. A cutting edge fashion company might consider somebody with sleeves to be "with it" or "hip". While the suits of a Wall Street firm might view it as too bold. Thankfully there are a variety of employers to work for. I know my limits, I would never even consider one of the traditionally conservative professions like law or insurance. In Seattle, it was only in the last ten years that Safeco relaxed their dress code allowing something other than a button down white shirt (pressed please).

Let me ask you this? Would you still not hire somebody if they could keep all their tattoos covered? If they were the top candidate, why shoot yourself in the foot? Or what if your sleeved candidate had "connections" and capable of bringing in millions in new accounts? What would your bosses say about your personal feelings then? My point is that it's dangerous to deal in "absolutes". There are too many ifs, ands, or buts in this day and age. Most of us know how the game is played, I'm old enough to know that all rules/policies can be bent if it means lining somebody's pockets. An employer can suddenly become your best friend when they find out about your distant relation to a Kennedy.

I'm gonna stop there because this is getting off topic, but you should start a thread in the employment section where you'd probably find much more agreement to your position, this forum is going to have many more people interested in personal forms of expression.

Great points and questions to ponder. I'm not interested enough to post a question in another forum. I was simply giving an honest perspective of what really happens in the real world.
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