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View Poll Results: Wardrobing - Buy, Wear and Return (Multiple Choice)
I have done it 5 7.04%
I would never do it 55 77.46%
I know someone who does it 7 9.86%
I don't know anybody who does it 24 33.80%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 71. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 09-21-2013, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,874 posts, read 12,914,194 times
Reputation: 28957

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If you've never worked in retail you have no idea of the vast numbers of consumers who commit retail fraud every day. It ranges from the one discussed in this thread, to employee receipt fraud (a consumer buys a sale item, an employee processes the return as full price, and they split the profit), price switching by changing tags, price arbitrage (buying two similar items and returning the cheaper one with the expensive one's tag), returning shoplifted merchandise for cash, and receipt fraud (using falsified receipts to return items).

In 2011 alone, America's retail companies lost between $14 and $18 BILLION in retail theft of the types listed above. That doesn't include more blatant types of crimes committed against retail companies. And clothing is just the tip of the iceberg. I know someone who worked at Home Depot who told me that he believed they processed a returned lawn mower for every one sold and kept. Electronic equipment of all types (particularly televisions), as well as sporting equipment, are particularly prone to what the OP calls "wardrobing." But it happens in every segment of retailing. I personally know a family who bought an entire suite of living and dining room furniture and returned it all after their party. Not shoes, not a dress ... thousands of dollars worth of furniture used for a week and returned.

And that instance was before I started to work for a furniture company. Like many other retailers, that company had to change its long-standing return policy while I worked there because of consumer fraud, joining retail giants like Costco, Macy's, Bon-Ton, Best Buy, REI, CVS, Dell, GameStop, Bath and Body Works, and even eBay, in altering their formerly liberal return policies to cut enormous losses. I also worked for a Federated Department Store (that did NOT put returned items back on the shelves, just for the record) and I came to believe that any return short of a limited time period with a receipt should be disallowed. And I add "limited time period" because of the shocking number of people who return things a year or more after purchase because they can produce the receipt. And I'm not talking about items that didn't live up to their warranty. I'm talking about clothing, handbags, jewelry, toys, anything related to a holiday, bed-in-bag sets that smell like bath products, etc. Seriously, people use bedding for a year and then have the nerve to return it. I've met them.

Yes, retail merchandise in America is overpriced. We are paying far more than things are actually worth. But we have many neighbors and acquaintances to thank for that.
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Old 09-21-2013, 04:23 PM
 
Location: North Texas
23,599 posts, read 31,135,299 times
Reputation: 26656
Bath and Body Works still has a liberal return policy on candles; every once in a while I get one that won't stay lit so I take it right back to the store, and they exchange it.
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Old 09-21-2013, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,874 posts, read 12,914,194 times
Reputation: 28957
Right after I made my post to this thread, I read this bizarre story about a Lego scam. Now multiply that by how many other people of questionable sanity are out there pulling similar stunts and add them to the number of people who commit fraud because they actually DO need money.

Tech executive's Lego bar-code scam was extensive, police allege - latimes.com
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Old 09-21-2013, 05:28 PM
 
752 posts, read 898,297 times
Reputation: 397
I'm fan of AquaVi t-shirts. Only they cost like 70$. Before one month I found one at marshal's for 12$. Check it in fitting room and it fit me perfectly. Only problem was that someone carry on it and sweat in it and had strong perfume at body. Big white marks underarm. I told to cashier it and she said "***" and I said I do not care it is an AquaVi and I both shirt. Just didn't carry right away then washed it first.

Last edited by tipitop; 09-21-2013 at 05:49 PM..
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Old 09-21-2013, 05:51 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
17,568 posts, read 21,741,355 times
Reputation: 44332
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
Would never do it, have not done it, and don't know anyone who does (or at least admits to it LOL.)
Actually it would never occur to me to do that, I mean really? People do it regularly? Yuck. That is very low-class.

On the other side of the coin: I bought a formal dress at JC Penneys (no, not as high end as Bloomies or NM but still). Brought it home, decided it wasn't really what I wanted, and tried to return it the next day. I hadn't even tried it on again and it still had the tags, was in the bag, still crisp and creased from being folded into the bag and I had the receipt...and they flat-out refused to give me a refund. I even went up the chain to senior managers, but nope. Haven't been back to JC Penney's since and that was about ten years ago.

So you bought it, took it home, and decided it wasn't right for you. That's different. You never wore it.

Once you have worn it, a line has been crossed.

There are places that rent formal attire - for a fee. I wonder if anyone has used them here.
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Old 09-21-2013, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico
1,240 posts, read 1,531,818 times
Reputation: 1503
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
If you've never worked in retail you have no idea of the vast numbers of consumers who commit retail fraud every day. It ranges from the one discussed in this thread, to employee receipt fraud (a consumer buys a sale item, an employee processes the return as full price, and they split the profit), price switching by changing tags, price arbitrage (buying two similar items and returning the cheaper one with the expensive one's tag), returning shoplifted merchandise for cash, and receipt fraud (using falsified receipts to return items).

In 2011 alone, America's retail companies lost between $14 and $18 BILLION in retail theft of the types listed above. That doesn't include more blatant types of crimes committed against retail companies. And clothing is just the tip of the iceberg. I know someone who worked at Home Depot who told me that he believed they processed a returned lawn mower for every one sold and kept. Electronic equipment of all types (particularly televisions), as well as sporting equipment, are particularly prone to what the OP calls "wardrobing." But it happens in every segment of retailing. I personally know a family who bought an entire suite of living and dining room furniture and returned it all after their party. Not shoes, not a dress ... thousands of dollars worth of furniture used for a week and returned.

And that instance was before I started to work for a furniture company. Like many other retailers, that company had to change its long-standing return policy while I worked there because of consumer fraud, joining retail giants like Costco, Macy's, Bon-Ton, Best Buy, REI, CVS, Dell, GameStop, Bath and Body Works, and even eBay, in altering their formerly liberal return policies to cut enormous losses. I also worked for a Federated Department Store (that did NOT put returned items back on the shelves, just for the record) and I came to believe that any return short of a limited time period with a receipt should be disallowed. And I add "limited time period" because of the shocking number of people who return things a year or more after purchase because they can produce the receipt. And I'm not talking about items that didn't live up to their warranty. I'm talking about clothing, handbags, jewelry, toys, anything related to a holiday, bed-in-bag sets that smell like bath products, etc. Seriously, people use bedding for a year and then have the nerve to return it. I've met them.

Yes, retail merchandise in America is overpriced. We are paying far more than things are actually worth. But we have many neighbors and acquaintances to thank for that.
I didn't realize any store had a return policy of over a year even with a receipt. Most stores I'm familiar with have had 90-day return windows with a receipt for as long as I can remember. I also don't know of any store that ever would accept an item for return with obvious use such as you mentioned for the bedding set.

It is true that many stores are now limiting and changing their return policies because of fraud and abuse. I know that Target and Walmart now put limits on how many times in a year you can return stuff without a receipt and also are now limiting the value of merchandise that can be returned in that way. I think the last time I returned something at Walmart without a receipt I was told the limit is now only twenty dollars per return.

However, both stores have never given cash back for those types of returns. Instead, they've always issued the amount on one of their store's gift cards for returns without a receipt.
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Old 09-22-2013, 01:50 AM
 
11,426 posts, read 19,433,663 times
Reputation: 18124
Many years ago I worked in retail, at a department store that got swallowed up by Macy's. Our return policy was SO lax, we once had a woman bring in a purse that her mother had purchased TEN YEARS BEFORE, still in the bag, still with the tags and the receipt in the bag. Obviously NOT used. Mother had died and they were cleaning out the closet and found and it.... and we took it back.

But retail theft is much more than wearing something and taking it back. I shop online for a lot of drug store items and I also shop carefully for our janitorial supplies because of theft. People buy the product, transfer the product into something else, and return the empty filled with water, or something else.

I once bought a hair product called Potion 9. There were 5 boxes on the shelf, I grabbed one, and once home, opened it up. It was white cheap cream rinse. (Potion 9 is a sweet smelling orange colored cream).

Went back to the store, three other boxes were opened, one was still shrink wrapped -- I took the shrink wrapped. The other three -- stolen and replaced product -- and it was a feat, because they were in metal toothpaste type tubes -- they didn't wrinkle them.

And the lady at the drug store was nonplussed. This happened, according to her, all the time.

Told my husband about it -- and he said don't trust the shrink wrapped ones..... they sell shrink wrap machines at the flea markets here.

I also always check boxes for products. I've gone to the drug store and picked up empty boxes and handed them to the clerks -- IF you can find one. I've bought stuff at Target only to get home and find out the bathroom scale I bought was a return -- and the product switched out, so I get their old broken one. So -- now at Target, if I can't tell the box hasn't been opened, when I go to buy it, at the checkout I will open it in front of the checkout clerk.

And yes -- more so than not -- I shop online, where I am assured that the product I get is the product I paid for.
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Old 09-22-2013, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,874 posts, read 12,914,194 times
Reputation: 28957
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQalex View Post
I didn't realize any store had a return policy of over a year even with a receipt. Most stores I'm familiar with have had 90-day return windows with a receipt for as long as I can remember. I also don't know of any store that ever would accept an item for return with obvious use such as you mentioned for the bedding set.

It is true that many stores are now limiting and changing their return policies because of fraud and abuse. I know that Target and Walmart now put limits on how many times in a year you can return stuff without a receipt and also are now limiting the value of merchandise that can be returned in that way. I think the last time I returned something at Walmart without a receipt I was told the limit is now only twenty dollars per return.

However, both stores have never given cash back for those types of returns. Instead, they've always issued the amount on one of their store's gift cards for returns without a receipt.
Many retailers, particularly department stores, had a no-questions asked return policy. They started it days they dealt with a regular clientele, many of whom were purchasing with the store's own credit card. Customers were people like my grandmother who would take a train to Pittsburgh once a month to buy practically everything she owned from Kaufmann's (the family that built Fallingwater) and Joseph Horne's and had it delivered (!) to her home that was about 50 miles away. Now people use national credit cards, department stores have dozens of subsidiaries, and shopping habits are much different. Largely because of competition from we'll-take-anything-back-too-Walmart, department stores felt they couldn't change their return policies. And it helped to drive them into the ground.

You are correct that many stores, including the one I worked for, would not give CASH back for obviously used items like bedding. But the store credit was no problem to customers. We used to have a particular run on used returns right before Christmas. People would return use items and then take their store credit and purchase the Christmas gifts they probably couldn't afford otherwise. We also had piles of returns of items like complete sets of Christmas-themed dishes and boxes of tree decorations in January. These kinds of huge losses are one of the reasons there are very few major department store chains left in the U.S.
List of defunct department stores of the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 09-22-2013, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,874 posts, read 12,914,194 times
Reputation: 28957
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
Bath and Body Works still has a liberal return policy on candles; every once in a while I get one that won't stay lit so I take it right back to the store, and they exchange it.
That's quite different than what we're discussing. A candle that won't light is a defective product. I can't think of any store that wouldn't take a return like that. Not to mention that, as you said, you EXCHANGED it. If you use the candle until it's a nub, take it back and ask for your cash back, I'm sure they wouldn't have a "liberal return policy on candles."
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Old 09-22-2013, 09:38 PM
 
11,426 posts, read 19,433,663 times
Reputation: 18124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
Many retailers, particularly department stores, had a no-questions asked return policy. They started it days they dealt with a regular clientele, many of whom were purchasing with the store's own credit card. Customers were people like my grandmother who would take a train to Pittsburgh once a month to buy practically everything she owned from Kaufmann's (the family that built Fallingwater) and Joseph Horne's and had it delivered (!) to her home that was about 50 miles away. Now people use national credit cards, department stores have dozens of subsidiaries, and shopping habits are much different. Largely because of competition from we'll-take-anything-back-too-Walmart, department stores felt they couldn't change their return policies. And it helped to drive them into the ground.

You are correct that many stores, including the one I worked for, would not give CASH back for obviously used items like bedding. But the store credit was no problem to customers. We used to have a particular run on used returns right before Christmas. People would return use items and then take their store credit and purchase the Christmas gifts they probably couldn't afford otherwise. We also had piles of returns of items like complete sets of Christmas-themed dishes and boxes of tree decorations in January. These kinds of huge losses are one of the reasons there are very few major department store chains left in the U.S.
List of defunct department stores of the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
I WORKED AT KAUFFMANN'S!!!! In the North Hills, for three years in college. That's where we took the bag back.

And you're right -- when I took the scale back to Target, I told them about the switch and the woman verified it and refunded my money no questions asked and put it back onto the restock shelves. I know, because the shelves were MARKED damaged goods and restock goods.
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