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Old 07-03-2014, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
28,166 posts, read 43,452,271 times
Reputation: 18562

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitten01 View Post
Uh yeah...ok

What's your definition of "didn't eat very badly" though?
Uh yeah... ok... what? Are you denying my story?

By "not very badly," I mean that I ate pretty normally for someone that age - didn't exist solely on salads and fruit every day, but also didn't gorge myself on junk food. My father kept Kosher (mother not so much), so the meats and dairy were limited in our house, and sugary foods were also not excessive. But again, I was a competitive figure skater (junior National level), among other competitive sports from age 8ish until near the end of high school. So yeah, kinda hard to say I was a lazy pig, when I can STILL skate circles around most skinny girls out there today. Get my point now?
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Old 07-03-2014, 09:06 PM
 
706 posts, read 912,068 times
Reputation: 1466
Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
Sounds like you're not very empathetic to how difficult these changes are, especially if you're coming from a LIFETIME of bad habits... that's like saying "I just can't understand why smokers don't quit the second they decide they want to," even if that smoker has been doing it since age 12 & is now 75. If losing weight and quitting smoking were that psychologically easy, the companies/products assisting with these issues would be billion-dollar industries. We'd all just decide, and BOOM, it would be done with zero assistance.

And yes, change IS scary. Anyone who thinks otherwise must have a pretty perfect life, and has never been forced (internally or externally) to make any major life changes.
Actually I used to BE fat. I was 5'9" and got up to 214 pounds/size 14 at one point after having my son and becoming a SAHM. I forced myself to make the change and I stopped eating the crap foods and started a healthy eating and exercise regimine. So don't tell me I don't know how hard change can be. But at some point you have to stop making the excuses for why you can't do it and just resolve to do it.

That was almost 7 years ago....,now I'm 140 pounds and a size 4. So yeah....I'm pretty sure I've walked the walk and am not simply talking the talk,
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Old 07-03-2014, 09:09 PM
 
706 posts, read 912,068 times
Reputation: 1466
Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
Uh yeah... ok... what? Are you denying my story?

By "not very badly," I mean that I ate pretty normally for someone that age - didn't exist solely on salads and fruit every day, but also didn't gorge myself on junk food. My father kept Kosher (mother not so much), so the meats and dairy were limited in our house, and sugary foods were also not excessive. But again, I was a competitive figure skater (junior National level), among other competitive sports from age 8ish until near the end of high school. So yeah, kinda hard to say I was a lazy pig, when I can STILL skate circles around most skinny girls out there today. Get my point now?
I asked because as someone who has trained clients, I've discovered that what most people think is healthy/clean eating, really isn't at all. Lots of people have misconceptions about that it means to maintain a healthy diet.
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Old 07-03-2014, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
28,166 posts, read 43,452,271 times
Reputation: 18562
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitten01 View Post
Actually I used to BE fat. I was 5'9" and got up to 214 pounds/size 14 at one point after having my son and becoming a SAHM. I forced myself to make the change and I stopped eating the crap foods and started a healthy rating and exercise regimine. So don't tell me I don't know how hard change can be. But at some point you have to stop making the excuses for why you can't do it and just resolve to do it.

That was almost 7 years ago....,now I'm 140 pounds and a size 4. So yeah....I'm pretty sure I've walked the walk and am not simply talking the talk,
You don't need to lecture me, since I've lost about the same amount as you have - and also did it through diet and exercise. But you either lose weight easily (was it all pregnancy weight?), or just have a very selective memory... because as I said, you seem to lack empathy towards people who are struggling with this issue. Was it EASY to lose that weight?

I never said it was impossible, or that anyone should give up on trying. My only point was that it's easier for some people than for others, and that change IS scary, so you can't expect everyone to get there right away (emotionally or physically). Took me years to make that change, and it's still a daily struggle to keep from gaining it all back.
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Old 07-03-2014, 09:14 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
28,166 posts, read 43,452,271 times
Reputation: 18562
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitten01 View Post
I asked because as someone who has trained clients, I've discovered that what most people think is healthy/clean eating, really isn't at all. Lots of people have misconceptions about that it means to maintain a healthy diet.
Again, I'm the last person you need to lecture... I used to see a nutritionist weekly, even attended Weight Watchers camps, because they couldn't figure out why a competitive figure skater wasn't thin. They taught me a lot about nutrition, but I never got skinny even with following a strict diet & exercise regiment. Actually, that's one of the main reasons I eventually quit skating, as I wasn't about to go anorexic/bulimic like so many other skaters I knew.

And guess when I gained the bulk of my weight, and got well over 200lbs (250 at my peak)? Mostly when I quit skating. So it wasn't like I stuffed myself to that weight, it was just apparently something I'd been fighting through the sports without even noticing. Took a while to get a handle on that, and find a good LIVABLE balance, but I'll never forgive those who made me feel unworthy during those years. It's damaging to one's psyche, no matter how you slice it.
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Old 07-03-2014, 09:16 PM
 
706 posts, read 912,068 times
Reputation: 1466
Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
You don't need to lecture me, since I've lost about the same amount as you have - and also did it through diet and exercise. But you either lose weight easily (was it all pregnancy weight), or just have a very selective memory... because as I said, you seem to lack empathy towards people who are struggling with this issue. Was it EASY to lose that weight?

I never said it was impossible, or that anyone should give up on trying. My only point was that it's easier for some people than for others, and that change IS scary, so you can't expect everyone to get there right away (emotionally or physically). Took me years to make that change, and it's still a daily struggle to keep from gaining it all back.
Actually, once I got serious about losing it and serious about cutting the crap out of my diet it was fairly easy to lose. I'm not saying it's easy for those who have legitimate health issues. What I am saying is that many I have talked to have admitted they're not willing to make the changes necessary to lose the weight. And for those people, you're right, I have zero sympathy for them. They are making the choice to remain how they are by not making the necessary changes, I have empathy only for those who have stopped crying about it and have actively made the changes necessary to lose the weight.
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Old 07-03-2014, 09:18 PM
 
706 posts, read 912,068 times
Reputation: 1466
Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
Again, I'm the last person you need to lecture... I used to see a nutritionist weekly, even attended Weight Watchers camps, because they couldn't figure out why a competitive figure skater wasn't thin. They taught me a lot about nutrition, but I never got skinny even with following a strict diet & exercise regiment. Actually, that's one of the main reasons I eventually quit skating, as I wasn't about to go anorexic/bulimic like so many other skaters I knew.

And guess when I gained the bulk of my weight, and got well over 200lbs (250 at my peak)? When I quit skating. So it wasn't like I stuffed myself to that weight, it was just apparently something I'd been fighting with the sports without even noticing. Took a while to get a handle on that, and find a good balance, but I'll never forgive those who made me feel unworthy during those years. It's damaging to one's psyche, no matter how you slice it.
I'm not interested in lecturing you. Unless you're paying me for my services, I have no invested interest In how much you do or don't eat and exercise or how much weight you gain or lose. We're having a discussion, that's all.
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Old 07-03-2014, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
28,166 posts, read 43,452,271 times
Reputation: 18562
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitten01 View Post
Actually, once I got serious about losing it and serious about cutting the crap out of my diet it was fairly easy to lose. I'm not saying it's easy for those who have legitimate health issues. What I am saying is that many I have talked to have admitted they're not willing to make the changes necessary to lose the weight. And for those people, you're right, I have zero sympathy for them. They are making the choice to remain how they are by not making the necessary changes, I have empathy only for those who have stopped crying about it and have actively made the changes necessary to lose the weight.
But maybe they're only on the WAY to changing, and need a supportive arm/ear to get there? Isn't that your job? (I take it you work as a personal trainer now)

And going back to the original point, made first by another poster, I'm only saying that weight loss/maintenance isn't some magical formula. Sure, you have to change your diet and lifestyle, but there are SO many other factors involved - psychological, genetic, etc. So you cannot judge someone as "not caring," just because it doesn't happen as quickly for them, or if they falter from time to time. Some folks can make that change more easily & quickly than others, but as long as they're trying, it would be nice to support them a little. If that's your client or loved one, I mean.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitten01 View Post
I'm not interested in lecturing you. Unless you're paying me for my services, I have no invested interest In how much you do or don't eat and exercise or how much weight you gain or lose. We're having a discussion, that's all.
Well, it sure comes across as lecturing! Maybe work on your delivery? And I wasn't just taking it as a personal lecture, as most of my comments were generally speaking to the overall points.
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Old 07-03-2014, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
28,166 posts, read 43,452,271 times
Reputation: 18562
P.S. Sorry for contributing to the off-topic discussion, but none of the above is even related to what the OP asked. They didn't ask "why are fat people fat?", they were asking about discrimination. Why does every thread related to this topic turn into an "eat better and exercise, fatties!" string of posts? It's like when anyone mentions a gay-related topic, the thread inevitably turns into people arguing over nature vs nurture, religion, etc. Human nature, I suppose, but it's annoying too.

Last edited by gizmo980; 07-03-2014 at 09:49 PM..
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Old 07-03-2014, 09:38 PM
 
706 posts, read 912,068 times
Reputation: 1466
I don't train people anymore because I got burned out doing it. A lot of trainers I know who try and help people get burnt out because many people don't want to accept that making radical dietary changes (not just working out an hour every 2-3 days with their trainer) is crucial to the process. It's frustrating seeing a person come train with you week after week and not make any real change because they refuse to stop eating all of the crap. After a while you get to the point of saying...why am I doing this besides collecting a check? I love helping people and encouraging those who are trying. I don't like having my time wasted by those who can't be bothered to put forth a genuine and consistent effort.
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