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Old 10-03-2014, 01:22 PM
 
11,429 posts, read 19,438,504 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Everdeen View Post
^I agree with everything here. I thread my needle the same way, but I have to, sometimes, enlist the help of a magnifying glass.


Be careful at Joann's. Although they do carry the less expensive brands, the larger stores often have a Viking/Husqvarna section with salespeople. They are great machines but have a heftier price tag.
And Husqvarna's aren't what they used to be.

My first machine was a Pfaff -- Hobby Pfaff. It was a light duty machine and perfect for making curtains and mending. I mode my first quilt on it. And that's when I knew -- it was time for an new machine.

The new one was a Husqvarna Lily 550... and it stood in good stead for 12 years. After my mother died I bought the Bernina.

That was like going from a Model T to a Roll Royce. I love that machine and even so -- I know it won't be my last...

I don't think my Joannes sells Husqvarna.....I think they are selling Elna's... but they used to sell Husqvarna... I'd bet there's a story there...
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Old 10-03-2014, 06:11 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,389 posts, read 50,582,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallysmom View Post
And Husqvarna's aren't what they used to be.

My first machine was a Pfaff -- Hobby Pfaff. It was a light duty machine and perfect for making curtains and mending. I mode my first quilt on it. And that's when I knew -- it was time for an new machine.

The new one was a Husqvarna Lily 550... and it stood in good stead for 12 years. After my mother died I bought the Bernina.

That was like going from a Model T to a Roll Royce. I love that machine and even so -- I know it won't be my last...

I don't think my Joannes sells Husqvarna.....I think they are selling Elna's... but they used to sell Husqvarna... I'd bet there's a story there...
Similar experience for my wife, the Husqvarna she bought not long after we got married in the mid 70s and lasted a loooong time, but should have because it was $700 back then. About 2001 she finally bought a Pfaff 7570. That was not at all worn out when she decided to get the Bernina 730. That one is still going strong but the hours are getting up there and she wants the 780. At over $10,000 less her discount (teaches at the store) we decided to wait until her car is paid off or the old one dies.
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Old 10-27-2014, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
18,850 posts, read 12,473,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nikitakolata View Post
I'm not much of a seamstress but I have one of the Brother Project Runway sewing machines and it has served me well for over 5 years now. I think it is a great machine for someone just starting out.
Those machines have a great reputation for working well, and being good for a new sewer.
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Old 01-30-2015, 09:34 PM
 
Location: NOT in the Land of lollipops & unicorns...I live in reality.
980 posts, read 859,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by princesasabia View Post
So I've been researching sewing machines lately, I didn't want to spend more than $150 on one. The ones in that price range though are mainly Singers and Brothers, but Ive read a lot of reviews and people say these machines are cheap. It seems as if Janomes are mid range priced machines and I haven't seen anyone say anything bad about that brand so far, but those are at least $200. I'm just a student who waits tables so there is no way I can afford a Bernina, Husqvarna Viking, or a Baby Lock which those brands seem to be the ones that experienced seamstresses say are awesome.

I want my sewing machine to last at least 2 years. I don't want a piece of junk, but I don't want the most expensive thing. I read that the best time to buy sewing machines are at Christmas time or Mothers day when there are really good deals on them, but I don't want to wait that long to get one. Since I'm stating out I know I don't need something with all the bells and whistles.

I was on a website and it said that these are must haves for a sewing machine:


Automatic buttonholer – Buttonholes are hard to sew beautifully, so this is where technology can really help out. Some machines have 4-step buttonholes, sewn in four steps. Others do a 1-step buttonhole, sewn in one step.

Good light – Older models often come with halogen lights, while newer models often have LED lights. Either way, the light should be bright enough to illuminate your sewing surface.

Built-in needle threader – You want a mechanism that will thread the needle for you so you don’t have to eyeball it. This is especially good for people with poor eyesight.

Adjustable needle feature – This allows you to move the needle off center to the left or right while straight stitching, a great feature for edge stitching.

Up/down needle feature – It allows you to choose whether the sewing needle will rise or stay embedded in the fabric when you take pressure off the controls. (Some machines have a button to automatically raise or lower the needle.) This comes in really handy if you want the needle to remain down so that you can pivot the fabric when sewing on a corner. Most of the basic machines we’re looking at here don’t have this ability.

Adjustable presser foot pressure – It’ll allow you to adjust the pressure of the presser foot to make it easier to sew a variety of fabrics.

Adjustable feed dog height – Similar to presser foot pressure, this allows you to adjust the height of the feed dogs (see “How a sewing machine works” below) to make it easier to sew a variety of fabrics.


There is a sewing center near me, but the people who work there aren't friendly including the owner and I hear that their prices are really high. So I know I will have to go online and get one. I also didn't want to spend more than $150 because I'm going to buy at least 2 books on sewing fundamentals and I know I have to buy other supplies as well.

Does any one have any advice on what to get?
I have a White (the brand, not color) sewing machine, in a wood cabinet, I have been using for 30 yrs that I bought for $30. at a yard sale when I moved to NC from Miami in 1986. I has no fancy bells and whistles but I don't sew things that need any button holes or embroidery anyhow. You can find GREAT sewing machines on Craigslist and MOST have either been used a few times or NEVER....someone bought them new or was given them for a present and then never got around to taking a class. There are many just like mine in the wood cabinets. BUY one, then take it to a place in West Gastonia that repairs and refurbishes ALL makes of machines...IF he is still alive. He is the BEST and will refurbish any machine you buy old, and make it brand new, then you can take the beginner sewing classes at MaryJo's (also in Gastonia) for less than $50. for like 8 classes. While taking them you will use their machines and find out IF you really need one with all the 'extras' for $1000 or better yet, I bet you will have all you need in a used and refurbished machine.
PS: If you use Craigslist, BE CAREFUL and meet people during the daytime, and take someone with you. I buy & sell off CL all the time. IF you can, meet people at a Police Dept and the police encourage this.
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Old 01-31-2015, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Oceania
8,623 posts, read 5,893,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QuilterChick View Post
Try to get the better Project Runway machine, the one with the larger sewing bed that holds the fabrics more steady and flat. I didn't know what your budget was when I responded earlier about getting a used higher end machine. I still have my Bernina 930 and a few others, but they were gifts. Buying sewing machines for some of us is like men who buy boats. We keep trading up to get more bells & whistles. But now I'm done; have my favorite Pfaff and won't ever need or want another machine. You should be fine with the Runway machine, just make sure you can get service somewhere if you need it, and accessories like special feet and upgrades if offered. Now, if you ever get into machine embroidery, that's a whole different kind of obsession. Have fun !
Guitars and amps are a better comparison. The quest for tone is endless; ask a guitar player.
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Old 03-29-2015, 07:23 PM
 
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Brother Cs 6000i is great machine for under $200.00.
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Old 04-29-2015, 01:14 PM
 
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Princes, you probably already bought a sewing machine by now, but I have to say, Kenmore makes a good machine. I purchased one for about $200 and loved it. But I sew everyday ... EVERYDAY... so I felt that after all these years I deserved something ... better. Well, better is nice, but I still like my Kenmore. Model 90110 I think. It's just like a Janome, but cheaper. I purchased mine online. Worth the money, particularly if you are new to sewing.

Visit PatternReview.com, too. You can see the results of others' efforts by pattern number.

Good luck.
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Old 05-03-2015, 11:12 AM
 
4,112 posts, read 3,447,161 times
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Buy old quality portable ones on EBay. I recommend Elna machines from the 1970's. Or a Singer grasshopper.

I purchased an Elna TSP for under $150 including shipping. It stitches absolutely beautifully and also does buttonholes & decorative stitching.

In addition to quality needles, use high quality thread in all machines. Mettler is best, Gutterman is good.
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Old 07-21-2018, 04:42 PM
 
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In 2016, I asked for a fancy sewing machine for a holiday and my husband took me shopping (awww, isn’t he sweet?). I figured that because I used my sewing machine so much, I should invest in an expensive machine. I purchased a fancy Husqvarna Opal 690Q. I took the classes that came with it. It had lots of fancy stitches and all the bells and whistles.

I hated it.

If only someone had explained to me how to choose a sewing machine that met my needs– not theirs.
Buying the most expensive sewing machine with new-fangled features is not necessarily the best move you can make. Before buying a machine, always ask yourself what you’re going to use it for, whether or not you need all the extra features or if they are something you can live without, given the kind of tasks you intend to do with your machine. Also consider what future use you may have for the sewing machine. For instance, if you aren’t doing embroidery stitches now but you are planning to do so in the near future, then getting in a machine that can handle embroidery might be a good idea.
The best advice I can give is to look on Amazon (I know I know...local dealers are great too but the choice between machines is not the same). On Amazon you can kind read the reviews, and even test the achine during an entire month. Look at the ones I've selected for you on Amazon : [url]https://goo.gl/rTs7j2[/url]
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Old 07-21-2018, 04:56 PM
 
511 posts, read 131,219 times
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Since you made the comment wanting the machine to last at least two years..your budget is fine..because as you grow into your great hobby you will become more savvy in what features you will want for your next upgrade model! Enjoy the journey!
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