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Old 04-09-2015, 07:36 AM
 
Location: I am right here.
4,869 posts, read 3,766,989 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by In_Correct View Post
Hmmmmmmmmmm.....







When my biological mother's uncle died, I inherited his socks. He was in a nursing home or something Because all his socks had an iron-on label stuck to them, with his name.



But to answer your question why would it bother you (or anybody)? Did the people die IN the clothes?
Otherwise, they are just clothes?????????? I kinda like the "old clothes smell". It is as memorable as a "new car smell".
Socks? People inherit socks?

I donate a lot of clothing, but never socks or underwear. I would never buy used socks or underwear either. That's just me, though.
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Old 04-09-2015, 07:38 AM
 
Location: I am right here.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Utopian Slums View Post
If i was like in the second grade it *might* bother me.

But probably not because my great gramps died that year and I slept in the bed he died in so.....
Interesting....

My dad insisted on getting a new mattress after my mom died in their bed.
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Old 04-09-2015, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,441 posts, read 16,813,850 times
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If you wash the socks, why not?

I've gotten some of the most neat and unusual boots from thrift stores. One pair laced up to the knee, but had pipe segments to lace them through. One had a second lacing on the side you could loosen to get them off. I'm pretty sure for the under ten dollars I spent they origionally went for far more. I also check out craft supplies. One store out in California just put them out in the box they came in, taking out only the frames. I got what would have been an 80 dollar plus frame for five dollars. I DO miss that place.

We got my sons coats when he was small from thrift stores. Kids coats get used for a part of a year and they get outgrown. One he loved so much we finally had to hide it since it was hard to get it around him. I also buy sweaters from thrift stores. They are the ones that are well made enough not to have fallen apart.
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Old 04-09-2015, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Not.here
2,828 posts, read 3,465,958 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by green papaya View Post
I think a lot of the clothing found in thrift shops , especially vintage clothing is probably deceased people's clothing, unless it's something current manufacter thats been worn a few times and donated recently.

most people donate deceased person's clothing after a death in the family

so the clothing your wearing could be a dead man's clothes / dead lady clothes

does it bother you? I remember as a kid going into Salvation Army it use to smell so bad I use to gag from the smell of the old clothing and old shoes.
I'm sure some of the articles in the thrift shops do come from family members discarding the clothes in the closets of deceased loved ones. I doubt that people would donate the items the person was wearing during the time when the family member was sick prior to death though, but I could be wrong. Btw, I donate my own good usable clothing to the local thrift stores, as do others I know. I also stop by the thrift stores occasionally and buy things.

I think the smell in the stores comes from all the homes where the items come from, the clothing as well as all the other things on sale in those stores. Clothing and other items absorb the smells from a home, which we in our own homes are used to, including tobacco smoke, cooking smells, disinfectants and cleaners, personal odor, and others. Put all those items together in a thrift store, and you are bound to come up with the 'interesting aroma' you mentioned in your post.
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Old 04-09-2015, 08:54 AM
 
Location: I am right here.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nezlie View Post
...Put all those items together in a thrift store, and you are bound to come up with the 'interesting aroma' you mentioned in your post.
yeah.....I have a very hard time with that "aroma".

And as far as the socks...some things are too personal to wear used...socks and underwear are those. Personally, I just cannot do it. I buy the 6-8 pack from Target or JCPenny, so new ones are not that expensive for me anyway.
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Old 04-09-2015, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Location: Location
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I was in my late 60s when I came across a yard sale near my home. I looked at a few things but nothing really spoke to me until I spotted a pair of red Western boots. OMG! I had wanted a pair of "cowgirl boots" ever since I saw my first Roy Rogers/Dale Evans movie!

I sidled over to where they were, saw no price but decided if they fit, I would buy them, whatever the cost. They were in the original box, showed no signs of wear. I slid my foot into the left boot and it fit!

I took the boots to the lady running the sale and asked her for a price. She smiled and said, "I bought those boots as a gift for my friend who was going to take Line Dancing lessons with me. She got breast cancer and died without ever taking one lesson. I'm glad you want them. Give me a buck."
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Old 04-09-2015, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
6,950 posts, read 7,724,845 times
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When we moved to northern Maine, I knew we'd be needing warmer clothing, as in wool. But wool clothing is expensive, and isn't made very well any more (too thin).

So we hit the thrift shops, and found plenty. You get the best prices when you buy 'off-season'. We went shopping in May for heavy woolens, and got great, hardly-worn stuff for $5 or less each. I found old wool Pendleton plaid shirts, nice and thick. I found a Filson wool vest. But I'm no snob. I bought 2 LL Bean wool 'Norweigian fishing' sweaters for $5 for both. I also found a brand new pair of black leather cowhide gloves (lined!) for $2. I don't care about the breathing status of the former owners. I'm warm and cozy when the temps get down to -15F!
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Old 04-09-2015, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Dallas
5,478 posts, read 4,627,941 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by green papaya View Post
I think a lot of the clothing found in thrift shops , especially vintage clothing is probably deceased people's clothing, unless it's something current manufacter thats been worn a few times and donated recently.

most people donate deceased person's clothing after a death in the family

so the clothing your wearing could be a dead man's clothes / dead lady clothes

does it bother you? I remember as a kid going into Salvation Army it use to smell so bad I use to gag from the smell of the old clothing and old shoes.
I never gave a 2nd thought to who owned the clothes or belongings I bought at a thrift store. When my parents passed away, their clothes were donated. What were we supposed to do with them? Discard them because the owners were now deceased?
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Old 04-09-2015, 10:25 AM
 
6,209 posts, read 3,315,391 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by green papaya View Post
I think a lot of the clothing found in thrift shops , especially vintage clothing is probably deceased people's clothing, unless it's something current manufacter thats been worn a few times and donated recently.

most people donate deceased person's clothing after a death in the family

so the clothing your wearing could be a dead man's clothes / dead lady clothes

does it bother you? I remember as a kid going into Salvation Army it use to smell so bad I use to gag from the smell of the old clothing and old shoes.
I've bought some wonderful clothes at used clothing stores. They are not necessary from deceased people. Some people get rid of older clothes or clothes that don't fit them anymore. But even if from deceased people, I don't care. They've been cleaned.

I have several Ralph Lauren sweaters, a wonderful Chico navy corderoy jacket, and other items I've gotten from used clothing stores.

Frugal people know to buy at these places. You have to be prepared to go through tons of crap to find the gems. But the gems are there, if you look long and hard enough for them.

Why pay $100 for a black Ralph Lauren sweater when I can get it at a used clothing store for $5 or $10, and it looks new? It's SMART to do this, if you have the time and there are such shops nearby.

I wouldn't waste my time with Goodwill or such places, though. I'm talking about real used clothing stores that specialize in nice clothing.

I wouldn't get shoes there, though. They rarely look new or good, anyway. Plus it seems kinda unsanitary and yukky to me.
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Old 04-09-2015, 10:39 AM
 
13,658 posts, read 16,241,793 times
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Without even getting into the issue of whether used clothing came from a dead person or a live person, let me share the experiences of a particularly-cheap friend of mine.

In addition to buying all of his clothing from thrift stores, he finally decided that he should also buy his shoes from thrift stores. Because shoes begin to conform to the specific shape of a person's foot after a few weeks, he was purchasing shoes that had taken on the conformation of other people's feet, and as a result, none of them ever fits properly. Once shoes have been worn for the first few weeks, they take on a particular form and that form will not be altered by the feet of the next owner, whose feet are different from those of the first owner of the shoes.

So, after his new cheaping-out routine with shoes, he has had to constantly swath his toes with band-aids and corn pads, simply because his "bargain" shoes never fit him properly. However, that is not the worst part. Because you are also winding up with the particular fungal colonies that were characteristic of the previous owner's feet, you are potentially exposing yourself to...God only knows what...various types of foot fungus. As soon as his doctor thinks that he has conquered the latest fungal infection, then--sure enough--my cheap friend buys another pair of old shoes and winds up a few weeks later with yet another outbreak of foot fungus.

I have tried to explain to him that his "bargain" shoes are not much of a bargain in light of the need to constantly buy band-aids, corn pads, and other types of aids. Then, when you factor in the cost of his MD visits and the cost of the Rx meds that he needs to take for his varied, ongoing foot fungus problems, he is undoubtedly spending far more than he would if he simply bought NEW shoes. However, he can't seem to see the forest for the trees, and he just keeps getting lured-in by the siren song of those $5.00 shoes.

All-in-all, very sad, IMHO.

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