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Old 11-12-2018, 08:27 AM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,663 posts, read 29,439,643 times
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Lord deliver me from mom jeans and sensible shoes. This is my favorite hairstyle to wear. Not too common in the over-60 crowd.lol

https://goo.gl/images/L7Db87
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Old 11-12-2018, 08:44 AM
 
5,614 posts, read 3,449,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rabflmom View Post
The reason my mom looked older in the 50s in my opinion.
1. She did not work out of the home so at home she wore house dresses that did not have to be new.
2. She used the money she had to dress her kids for school and to also have shoes, coats, dresses, suits, that her children wore only to church, weddings, and funerals. There were 11 of us and we always had good clothes.
3. She didn't have the modern conveniences that make our lives so easy today. She had to work all day until she went to bed most days.She prepared 3 meals a day, took care of the kids, cleaned house, made most of her and the kids clothes, and do all the dishes by hand. She may have even been the one pushing the push mower to mow the yard and scooping snow. And she helped all our elderly neighbors and even the town when needed.
A. You didn't just throw clothes in a washer and dryer then. Many still had to use a separate wringer to wring them out. You had to hang them on the line outside-even in winter with snow on the ground, and then you had to iron everything-including sheets and your husbands boxers. Nothing was permanent press.
B. Not a lot of prepared foods so you cooked from scratch. You spent days of summer working in the garden, picking, and canning hundreds of jars of food to get through the winter. She may even have had chickens or rabbits that she killed herself, cleaned, and then cooked for her family's dinner.
c. If you had kids you rarely were taken out to eat or places you had to dress better except for church and school functions.
d. You were thought of as a floozy if you dyed your hair so the gray showed up. You didn't have the type of beauty products to make your hair look better-hair dryers, steam curlers, hair straighteners, etc. You wore curlers covered by a scarf on Saturdays so your hair would look good for church on Sunday. For that matter you may have only got 1 or 2 baths a week because not every house had in door plumbing yet.
e. Most women still did not wear a lot of makeup or use cosmetics to cover wrinkles.
f. Skin would tan and get sunburned because there were not the sun products then. They weren't sunbathing, but outside in the gardens and hanging out clothes etc.
g. And the most important thing in the world-----their husbands thought they were the most beautiful woman in the world.
Good grief, are we talking about the 1850s? You must have lived WAY out in the country because by the 1950s pretty much everywhere else had indoor plumbing and the kind of washer that didn't need a separate wringer. My mom was born in 1926 and she certainly always did.

By the way, she had 7 children. The oldest was born in 1947. Mom was meticulous about her looks and always had her hair colored (she went gray early, as did my sisters) and styled, and wore nice-fitting clothes. I think she would have died of shame before going out even to the corner grocery in a loose housedress with curlers in her hair and no makeup.

That was the norm; at least where we lived. Women who "let themselves go" were frowned upon. I do think she and most women of that era looked older than women of the same age today because of the styles, but they did not look like they just walked off Tobacco Road.

Last edited by saibot; 11-12-2018 at 08:52 AM..
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Old 11-12-2018, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Boonies of N. Alabama
2,401 posts, read 2,141,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Good grief, are we talking about the 1850s? You must have lived WAY out in the country because by the 1950s pretty much everywhere else had indoor plumbing and the kind of washer that didn't need a wringer. My mom was born in 1926 and she certainly always did.

By the way, she had 7 children. The oldest was born in 1947. Mom was meticulous about her looks and always had her hair colored (she went gray early, as did my sisters) and styled, and wore nice-fitting clothes. I think she would have died of shame before going out even to the corner grocery in a loose housedress with curlers in her hair and no makeup.

That was the norm; at least where we lived. Women who "let themselves go" were frowned upon. I do think she and most women of that era looked older than women of the same age today because of the styles, but they did not look like they just walked off Tobacco Road.

It can depend on where one lived and how wealthy they were. I grew up in New England and experienced part of this but certainly not all.
We moved to Alabama in the mid 70s. I can tell you that outside of the main city there were a LOT of people with no indoor plumbing. Some without electricity still and many still grew much of their own food or went hungry.

I would have never thought this was still going on had I not seen it for myself.
There were still quite a few in the more rural areas in the 1990s.


For some people.. this is in fact a memory whether you experienced it or not.
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Old 11-12-2018, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Boonies of N. Alabama
2,401 posts, read 2,141,973 times
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To the person that messaged me that the lifespan was NOT shorter in the 40s and 50s... it was.
A simple google search would have shown that. It's only recently in the US that it started to drop for the first time.
Life expectancy in the USA, 1900-98


https://www.seniorliving.org/history...united-states/
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Old 11-12-2018, 09:52 AM
 
3,472 posts, read 5,909,373 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Good grief, are we talking about the 1850s? You must have lived WAY out in the country because by the 1950s pretty much everywhere else had indoor plumbing and the kind of washer that didn't need a separate wringer. My mom was born in 1926 and she certainly always did.

By the way, she had 7 children. The oldest was born in 1947. Mom was meticulous about her looks and always had her hair colored (she went gray early, as did my sisters) and styled, and wore nice-fitting clothes. I think she would have died of shame before going out even to the corner grocery in a loose housedress with curlers in her hair and no makeup.

That was the norm; at least where we lived. Women who "let themselves go" were frowned upon. I do think she and most women of that era looked older than women of the same age today because of the styles, but they did not look like they just walked off Tobacco Road.
Lived about 75 miles from Chicago. Yep not everyone-even in town had indoor plumbing. Many houses had bathrooms added in the 50s. The washers in the 50s sometimes had a wringer above the wash tub, but some were a separate feature and you fed the clothes through it. My mom got her first modern day washer and dryer up in the main part of the house instead of the basement in 1960.

Actually my mom had beautiful black hair that was never gray even when she died in 1982. Back in the 50s the colors/dyes were not as easy to use and the black dye always looked so fake on women. If you went blonde it wasn't a clairol mix like in the 60s but a real bleach. And yep-even the teens walked around out in public with curlers under a scarf before their big dates.

Never said my mom let herself go. Was just pointing out the difference from today. House dresses weren't dirty and ugly just comfortable. Maybe city moms had it a lot different than small town rural areas. BTW we were not dirt poor, hick, hillbillies and most people in my area of the midwest grew up similarly unless they lived right in the city. We did have a bathroom upstairs that was built in the plans of our big 2 story house but several aunts and uncles in even smaller towns still had out houses and pumps at the kitchen sink in their houses on the farm and in town. Grandma's house on the farm had indoor water from the well, but the toilet inside was still just a hole in the ground under the house without plumbing going to it. Yep. Things were different in different areas of the country. It does account for women looking older. They worked much harder than we do today without all the conveniences.

Last edited by Rabflmom; 11-12-2018 at 10:22 AM..
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Old 11-12-2018, 09:58 AM
 
207 posts, read 85,257 times
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I am responding to the original post.

What makes a woman look older is a number of things and it depends if they live in four season country, the colour of their skin and hair. Today, it is popular for young girls to colour their hair grey or white and still look very youthful. There are other factors.

Having non-frizzy hair (my personal battle)
Not having short hair for most cases that look very dated.
Good skin with even skin tone
Dewy or satin makeup look, with defined and proper fullness of eyebrows, wearing false lashes so add more fullness; not wearing deep colour on the lips.
I prefer the neutral cool colours and using contouring to add proper definition and less eye shadow, but the contouring on the eyes help.
Purple/lilac cream corrector to add brightness in the right spots on the face.
As for clothes, making sure it fits properly.
Mixing light shimmer into your body lotion to give a nice glow.
Regular skin routine and masks to be used on daily basis as you get older.
Full plump lips by using lip pencils, lipsticks by using two different shades to contour and give pouty fish lips. I find using lip stain, remove, use two different lip pencil colours in the right spot of the lip and light nude neutral lipstick give a big plush look and if needed, lip gloss on top.
Defined cheeks by using contouring; knowing where to place your blush without overdoing it that it covers the whole side of your face and highlighter.
Skin care regime for your hands and manicured nails & feet.

Men need to maintain their looks also. Groomed eyebrows, good skin.
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Old 11-12-2018, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
26,995 posts, read 28,419,822 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Good grief, are we talking about the 1850s? You must have lived WAY out in the country because by the 1950s pretty much everywhere else had indoor plumbing and the kind of washer that didn't need a separate wringer. My mom was born in 1926 and she certainly always did.

By the way, she had 7 children. The oldest was born in 1947. Mom was meticulous about her looks and always had her hair colored (she went gray early, as did my sisters) and styled, and wore nice-fitting clothes. I think she would have died of shame before going out even to the corner grocery in a loose housedress with curlers in her hair and no makeup.

That was the norm; at least where we lived. Women who "let themselves go" were frowned upon. I do think she and most women of that era looked older than women of the same age today because of the styles, but they did not look like they just walked off Tobacco Road.
My grandma never had a washing machine until the 1990s. When we went to visit as a kid we washed our clothing in the bathtub. Few of her neighbors had laundry machines. She lives in a really poor part of rural North Carolina. Not much has changed. My other grandma didn’t have a dryer. She lives in a slightly less poor part of South Carolina. My grandparents passed away in the late 90s and early 2000s.
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Old 11-12-2018, 10:17 AM
 
997 posts, read 409,849 times
Reputation: 2505
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rabflmom View Post
Lived about 75 miles from Chicago. Yep not everyone-even in town had indoor plumbing. Many houses had bathrooms added in the 50s. The washers in the 50s sometimes had a wringer above the wash tub, but some were a separate feature and you fed the clothes through it. My mom got her first modern day washer and dryer up in the main part of the house instead of the basement in 1960.

Actually my mom had beautiful black hair that was never gray even when she died in 1982. Back in the 50s the colors/dyes were not as easy to use and the black dye always looked so fake on women. If you went blonde it wasn't a clairol mix like in the 60s but a real bleach.
+1 for this story. My MIL, who is pushing 80, was telling me last time she visited about the wringer feature on the washer she used back long ago (I was surprised, this was the first I'd heard of it from her). She has also dyed her hair the entire time I've known her - it's funny, her hair is perfectly brown whereas mine is going gray.
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Old 11-12-2018, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
19,282 posts, read 12,748,394 times
Reputation: 25217
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Good grief, are we talking about the 1850s? You must have lived WAY out in the country because by the 1950s pretty much everywhere else had indoor plumbing and the kind of washer that didn't need a separate wringer. My mom was born in 1926 and she certainly always did.

By the way, she had 7 children. The oldest was born in 1947. Mom was meticulous about her looks and always had her hair colored (she went gray early, as did my sisters) and styled, and wore nice-fitting clothes. I think she would have died of shame before going out even to the corner grocery in a loose housedress with curlers in her hair and no makeup.

That was the norm; at least where we lived. Women who "let themselves go" were frowned upon. I do think she and most women of that era looked older than women of the same age today because of the styles, but they did not look like they just walked off Tobacco Road.
Yes, my family experience does not match the previous posterís either. In your case, it sounds as if your family was more affluent than mine, but it is closer to mine. I do remember wringer washers and clotheslines. But we never owned a wringer, and we did get a dryer eventually. My dad dabbled in gardening but my mom did not can. We bought our groceries in a modern grocery store, and some times at garden stands. My mom began teaching school when I was young, and I donít remember many housedresses.

Most if my momís friends were similar, except they did not work until their kids were mostly raised. I do not remember many if them being terribly fashionable. They might have colored their hair; you could certainly buy Miss Clairol at the drugstore. The weekly beauty shop appointments for married women did not hapoen until in the sixties, as I remember. It seems amazing to me that my motherís generation could not style their hair. My mother never did learn, but perhaps she was not typical.

Yes, fashions of the fifties were not kind to older women. Cat eye glasses, poodle cuts, tiny waists, bright red liostick. None of that was flattering. Anyone else remember home permanents? Ugh!
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Old 11-12-2018, 11:11 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
73,473 posts, read 65,146,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IndyDancer View Post
+1 for this story. My MIL, who is pushing 80, was telling me last time she visited about the wringer feature on the washer she used back long ago (I was surprised, this was the first I'd heard of it from her). She has also dyed her hair the entire time I've known her - it's funny, her hair is perfectly brown whereas mine is going gray.
There was one of those washers with the wringer on top at a cabin my parents used to rent for summer vacation, when we were kids. To us, it looked like something out of a history book, or an antique store. But it was the only washer the cabin had. It was not a relic; it was still very much in use.
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