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Old 05-11-2019, 10:47 AM
 
806 posts, read 236,095 times
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According to my son. Russian do not wear polyester. It is all natural fibers like cotton or wool. They also don't wear puffy coats and no gore tex waterproof fabric either. They mainly wear single breasted wool coats.

He thinks because it reminds them of their soviet history, Russian don't wear peacoats. Dear God, stay away, far away, from any soviet clothing! It is a political statement rather than a fashion one.

Men wear dark colors only.

He said the most important is Russian gets more precipitation (snow) and they don't shovel sidewalks. You will be walking on snow all winter. The most important item of clothing is good workboats. Nothing made of all rubber (like muck boats), but mainly leather or leather looking material. Two pairs to switch between: one to wear and one to air out Russian don't wear sneakers but dress shoes in warmer weather.

There are youtube tutorials on how to tie a tie.

My son loved Russia. He was fluent in Russian because of that they didn't think he was an American.

Russian have a custom, they will refill you glass when it is empty. It is rude to say no. Instead, you leave your glass half filled. They drink vodka with dinner so keeping your glass half filled is important. NEVER GET DRUNK THERE.

You can be stopped by the police at any moment, and are required by law, to keep you visa and transit papers on your person. Instead keep your visa and papers securely in your apartment and bring copies (xerox's) with you. If you visa/papers are taken by the police or worse lost, you don't want yourself in the wrong.

Last edited by YorktownGal; 05-11-2019 at 10:59 AM..
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Old 05-11-2019, 11:41 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
6,987 posts, read 6,422,652 times
Reputation: 13377
Quote:
Originally Posted by CuriousAboutRussia View Post
Hey y'all, stupid question for you...I'm 22 and moving to a new country (Russia, Siberia to be exact, yes there is good reasons for it and I'm going to university there to study Russian) and I'm considering changing up my style a bit to look nicer, because why not. Right now, I dress like someone you'd find working on a ranch, which isn't bad, it's just what I like. I want to start wearing dress shirts and slacks/dress pants every day, but I don't have a huge budget........

I'm in agreement with Nik4me. You need to re-evaluate your motives about your choices of styles of clothes and the kind of trouble they might get you into.

Who will you be trying to impress with your dressy clothes? The girls? When you're going to university in a foreign country like Siberia you should be careful your wardrobe plans don't backfire on you and cause serious trouble and shunning for you, possibly even beatings or worse from some of the men if they think you're showing off and trying to impress their women. And more serious yet, you need to avoid making yourself a big ol' target for the criminal elements.

I think you should do some research to find out what styles of practical, daily clothing the other students in the Siberian university are wearing and then plan to dress accordingly. If it turns out they all wear dress shirts and dress pants every day at university (which I seriously doubt) then you will be okay. If not, then change your own plans and wear the styles of clothes that are similar or same as what they wear. You will need to fit in with the students and other people for the year you are there rather than standing apart and causing serious resentment against you as "that show-off American who dresses up every day and thinks he's better than everyone else".

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 05-11-2019 at 12:26 PM..
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Old 05-11-2019, 01:33 PM
 
1,272 posts, read 927,111 times
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Let me tell you - if you don't want to look like a freak and keep catching cold all the time, buy 40 below coat at Lands'End (you can search by temperature), and be happy. Or, buy a real fur coat (make sure it's gender-appropriate fur). Usually "dublenkas" work - a mouton coat with skin outside, fur inside. Mouton varezhki (gloves w/o fingers) are really good for winter. Wool socks also help.

If you are going to mix with some rock-band or artistic folks type, then maybe army coat will work, but just for looks.

Saying is as a Russian living where 40 below can stay for weeks.

But yes, overall in big cities in Russia people appreciate better dressing style. True about polyester - avoid it, id possible. Avoid fake leather as well - it's regarded as cheap. Fashion in Yakutsk can be different from Moscow, though. Not sure that the statement about only dark colors for men is still applicable everywhere, definitely not in Moscow. Students usually don't wear suits daily. They do when they present a thesis, or start looking for career, or, sometimes, get awarded something.
People still iron their clothes, especially dress shirts and pants. Jeans - not so often.



Make sure you have good winter boots. Leather Dr Martens for milder weather will do. Vibram soles are essential for winter walks in Russia - sidewalks are always slippery in the winter, everywhere.

Last edited by BusyMeAK; 05-11-2019 at 01:53 PM..
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Old 05-11-2019, 02:14 PM
 
1,078 posts, read 306,816 times
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If you plan on shipping anything to yourself such as shoes - send one shoe at a time. I had a friend years ago that mailed clothing to Russian relatives and it was the only way she could get shoes through customs without them being stolen.
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Old 05-11-2019, 02:20 PM
 
1,078 posts, read 306,816 times
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I don't know if it is the same today, but years ago Levi's were a hot commodity in Russia. Might be something you could trade for Russian items.

I would be most concerned about warm footwear and a coat. I love the wool greatcoats, but you might be better off with an anorak.

I love thrift stores, although I am not impressed with Goodwill. See what you can find in the thrift stores. It is hit and miss....but sometimes luck is smiling on one. Don't forget the long underwear. And..... what about a pair of ski pants?
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Old 05-11-2019, 04:04 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
223 posts, read 32,145 times
Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by YorktownGal View Post
According to my son. Russian do not wear polyester. It is all natural fibers like cotton or wool. They also don't wear puffy coats and no gore tex waterproof fabric either. They mainly wear single breasted wool coats.

He thinks because it reminds them of their soviet history, Russian don't wear peacoats. Dear God, stay away, far away, from any soviet clothing! It is a political statement rather than a fashion one.

Men wear dark colors only.

He said the most important is Russian gets more precipitation (snow) and they don't shovel sidewalks. You will be walking on snow all winter. The most important item of clothing is good workboats. Nothing made of all rubber (like muck boats), but mainly leather or leather looking material. Two pairs to switch between: one to wear and one to air out Russian don't wear sneakers but dress shoes in warmer weather.

There are youtube tutorials on how to tie a tie.

My son loved Russia. He was fluent in Russian because of that they didn't think he was an American.

Russian have a custom, they will refill you glass when it is empty. It is rude to say no. Instead, you leave your glass half filled. They drink vodka with dinner so keeping your glass half filled is important. NEVER GET DRUNK THERE.

You can be stopped by the police at any moment, and are required by law, to keep you visa and transit papers on your person. Instead keep your visa and papers securely in your apartment and bring copies (xerox's) with you. If you visa/papers are taken by the police or worse lost, you don't want yourself in the wrong.
Can you give an example of a wool coat that would not be a peacoat? I'm not familiar...i usually just wear what is comfortable.

Dark colors is good to know. I did hear that if you wear bright colors there, people will think you're gay. I don't know if that's true, but it's not the impression I want.

Doc Martens have a bad rep in the UK and US, but no such reputation exists there, correct?

I wish I was fluent, but that is part of the reason I'm going after all!

I don't drink much anyway, so I will definitely have to keep that in mind.

I also didn't want to bring my papers with me at all times. Will most cops accept copies?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I'm in agreement with Nik4me. You need to re-evaluate your motives about your choices of styles of clothes and the kind of trouble they might get you into.

Who will you be trying to impress with your dressy clothes? The girls? When you're going to university in a foreign country like Siberia you should be careful your wardrobe plans don't backfire on you and cause serious trouble and shunning for you, possibly even beatings or worse from some of the men if they think you're showing off and trying to impress their women. And more serious yet, you need to avoid making yourself a big ol' target for the criminal elements.

I think you should do some research to find out what styles of practical, daily clothing the other students in the Siberian university are wearing and then plan to dress accordingly. If it turns out they all wear dress shirts and dress pants every day at university (which I seriously doubt) then you will be okay. If not, then change your own plans and wear the styles of clothes that are similar or same as what they wear. You will need to fit in with the students and other people for the year you are there rather than standing apart and causing serious resentment against you as "that show-off American who dresses up every day and thinks he's better than everyone else".

.
You bring up some fantastic points. I could certainly wait until I get to Russia to buy clothing...I'd see if a Russian friend there could go shopping with me. I'm certainly trying to make a good impression on girls, as most guys want to, but I wanted to dress nice for the confidence boost. I wouldn't wear any uber nice name brand clothes, I can't afford that. I certainly don't want to make myself a target for criminals, either.

Quote:
Originally Posted by E-Twist View Post
I don't know if it is the same today, but years ago Levi's were a hot commodity in Russia. Might be something you could trade for Russian items.

I would be most concerned about warm footwear and a coat. I love the wool greatcoats, but you might be better off with an anorak.

I love thrift stores, although I am not impressed with Goodwill. See what you can find in the thrift stores. It is hit and miss....but sometimes luck is smiling on one. Don't forget the long underwear. And..... what about a pair of ski pants?
I think Levi's are still super popular there. Someone recommended going nowhere near a greatcoat because they're a political statement there (Soviet greatcoats, that is). I've actually never been skiing or snowboarding in my life. Long underwear is a must, I was planning on getting some wool lined jeans as well.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BusyMeAK View Post
Let me tell you - if you don't want to look like a freak and keep catching cold all the time, buy 40 below coat at Lands'End (you can search by temperature), and be happy. Or, buy a real fur coat (make sure it's gender-appropriate fur). Usually "dublenkas" work - a mouton coat with skin outside, fur inside. Mouton varezhki (gloves w/o fingers) are really good for winter. Wool socks also help.

If you are going to mix with some rock-band or artistic folks type, then maybe army coat will work, but just for looks.

Saying is as a Russian living where 40 below can stay for weeks.

But yes, overall in big cities in Russia people appreciate better dressing style. True about polyester - avoid it, id possible. Avoid fake leather as well - it's regarded as cheap. Fashion in Yakutsk can be different from Moscow, though. Not sure that the statement about only dark colors for men is still applicable everywhere, definitely not in Moscow. Students usually don't wear suits daily. They do when they present a thesis, or start looking for career, or, sometimes, get awarded something.
People still iron their clothes, especially dress shirts and pants. Jeans - not so often.



Make sure you have good winter boots. Leather Dr Martens for milder weather will do. Vibram soles are essential for winter walks in Russia - sidewalks are always slippery in the winter, everywhere.
Will "faux fur" not work? I am not the artistic or rock band type, I'm pretty average. I don't really like suits anyway, but you're saying people do wear nice shirts and pants? I was told to buy winter boots in Russia.
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Old 05-11-2019, 06:43 PM
 
1,272 posts, read 927,111 times
Reputation: 2226
Quote:
Originally Posted by CuriousAboutRussia View Post
Can you give an example of a wool coat that would not be a peacoat? I'm not familiar...i usually just wear what is comfortable.

Dark colors is good to know. I did hear that if you wear bright colors there, people will think you're gay. I don't know if that's true, but it's not the impression I want.

Doc Martens have a bad rep in the UK and US, but no such reputation exists there, correct?

I wish I was fluent, but that is part of the reason I'm going after all!

I don't drink much anyway, so I will definitely have to keep that in mind.

I also didn't want to bring my papers with me at all times. Will most cops accept copies?


You bring up some fantastic points. I could certainly wait until I get to Russia to buy clothing...I'd see if a Russian friend there could go shopping with me. I'm certainly trying to make a good impression on girls, as most guys want to, but I wanted to dress nice for the confidence boost. I wouldn't wear any uber nice name brand clothes, I can't afford that. I certainly don't want to make myself a target for criminals, either.


I think Levi's are still super popular there. Someone recommended going nowhere near a greatcoat because they're a political statement there (Soviet greatcoats, that is). I've actually never been skiing or snowboarding in my life. Long underwear is a must, I was planning on getting some wool lined jeans as well.



Will "faux fur" not work? I am not the artistic or rock band type, I'm pretty average. I don't really like suits anyway, but you're saying people do wear nice shirts and pants? I was told to buy winter boots in Russia.

Faux fur coat will look pretty much strange on a male in Russia. But totally OK on Alaska style winter coats, like down puffy ones.

I have no idea what rep Dr Martens has (can you tell me please?) but I wear them and intend to wear for as long as I will be able to find genuine leather versions. Their soles are Vibram soles, that we used to have on mountain hiking boots, and for city wear, on icy sidewalks, they are just perfect.

Bright colors - reaction to them depends on how one wears them and how he behaves. If one has tropical cockatoo colors on him, a sparkly scarf, face make-up, and moves and smiles and speaks like gay people do, then yes, theoretically, there can be trouble (the farther form Moscow or Sankt Petersbourg, the more possibility of it). Bright colors on people with no doubt about their orientation can easily be worn. Nothing you wear can save you from really bad people, true for the entire Earth.
Wool coats are usually worn by oldtimers, businessmen, politicians, and women. Men usually, for casual looks, wear leather, dublenkas, or down/sintepon filled coats. But don't sweat too much over it. There's way more internal freedom in people now than 30 year ago, folks finally have realized that there's no need in being all dressed similarly.

I believe what you'll find will be a student crowd in jeans and casual shirts, but I'd take some (not much) nice clothes from home. It can be a great way to find friends - ask folks to help you with shopping and tell them that you tried to figure out what to bring along, but were confused by advice Maybe even ask a good-looking girl to help with shopping.
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Old 05-11-2019, 09:12 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
223 posts, read 32,145 times
Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by BusyMeAK View Post
Faux fur coat will look pretty much strange on a male in Russia. But totally OK on Alaska style winter coats, like down puffy ones.

I have no idea what rep Dr Martens has (can you tell me please?) but I wear them and intend to wear for as long as I will be able to find genuine leather versions. Their soles are Vibram soles, that we used to have on mountain hiking boots, and for city wear, on icy sidewalks, they are just perfect.

Bright colors - reaction to them depends on how one wears them and how he behaves. If one has tropical cockatoo colors on him, a sparkly scarf, face make-up, and moves and smiles and speaks like gay people do, then yes, theoretically, there can be trouble (the farther form Moscow or Sankt Petersbourg, the more possibility of it). Bright colors on people with no doubt about their orientation can easily be worn. Nothing you wear can save you from really bad people, true for the entire Earth.
Wool coats are usually worn by oldtimers, businessmen, politicians, and women. Men usually, for casual looks, wear leather, dublenkas, or down/sintepon filled coats. But don't sweat too much over it. There's way more internal freedom in people now than 30 year ago, folks finally have realized that there's no need in being all dressed similarly.

I believe what you'll find will be a student crowd in jeans and casual shirts, but I'd take some (not much) nice clothes from home. It can be a great way to find friends - ask folks to help you with shopping and tell them that you tried to figure out what to bring along, but were confused by advice Maybe even ask a good-looking girl to help with shopping.
Doc Martens sadly have a reputation of being worn by racist white nationalists, due to some "Skinheads" (not an inherently bad group, it was just a culture movement in the UK during the 70s) adopting them as part of the normal outfit. More info can be found here. Are they pretty warm?

I don't find myself wearing bright colors much, and I certainly would never wear makeup, so I'm not too worried about that. As far as dublenkas go, they all seem to be pretty expensive, though I'm sure I could get one for less than $200 when I'm in Russia, no?

I wouldn't mind asking a girl, but I'll ask anyone I can find. Offer to take them to lunch/buy them food if they do.
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Old 05-11-2019, 09:32 PM
 
145 posts, read 61,678 times
Reputation: 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by dazzleman View Post
I can only say that in Siberia in the winter, you can't look nice. You have to wear multiple layers of clothes, and that always ends up looking a bit dowdy. But it's better than freezing to death.
I was going to suggest the OP to post his inquiries in the Chicago forum. Winters are pretty close to what Siberia will be for the OP.

I wouldn't buy any nice clothes here to wear there. I'd bring clothing that's practical. People dress casually in Russia just like they do in the US, and I wouldn't start out by sticking out too much. You can always buy shirts and nice pants/blazers there. They won't cost all that much considering you have income from the US coming in.

I would zip my lips about having any US income and I would be very alert to my surroundings. Sounds like you do not speak the language, so be very careful about people possibly wanting to take advantage of you. If you are going to a university program as an international student I'd say it is best if you lived in a dorm with other foreign (and some Russian) students until you learned the language and the city.

You are very young and going in with zero skills and local experience, so stick to people like you, i.e. students who live on campus. You are not a going there for work, and there isn't anybody there who can guide you through the adjustment process. You won't know people you can trust (like your boss, coworkers, other expats etc) for things.

I'd either rethink the whole idea (that is going without any plan or firm offers of a job at hand) or be EXTREMELY careful.

Your plan sounds very naive to me.
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Old 05-11-2019, 09:41 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
223 posts, read 32,145 times
Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty_nina1 View Post
I was going to suggest the OP to post his inquiries in the Chicago forum. Winters are pretty close to what Siberia will be for the OP.

I wouldn't buy any nice clothes here to wear there. I'd bring clothing that's practical. People dress casually in Russia just like they do in the US, and I wouldn't start out by sticking out too much. You can always buy shirts and nice pants/blazers there. They won't cost all that much considering you have income from the US coming in.

I would zip my lips about having any US income and I would be very alert to my surroundings. Sounds like you do not speak the language, so be very careful about people possibly wanting to take advantage of you. If you are going to a university program as an international student I'd say it is best if you lived in a dorm with other foreign (and some Russian) students until you learned the language and the city.

You are very young and going in with zero skills and local experience, so stick to people like you, i.e. students who live on campus. You are not a going there for work, and there isn't anybody there who can guide you through the adjustment process. You won't know people you can trust (like your boss, coworkers, other expats etc) for things.

I'd either rethink the whole idea (that is going without any plan or firm offers of a job at hand) or be EXTREMELY careful.

Your plan sounds very naive to me.
Again, I have experience living in temperatures just a bit warmer than what I will be going to there. It's not like I'm going from Phoenix, Arizona to Siberia. I probably will just buy clothes there.

I will be staying in the university dorm. I was going to get an apartment, but I realized how bad of an idea that is and rethought the decision...it'll also save me $400+ a month. There are Rabbis there that I would get in contact with before I move there, just like I did when I went to live in Montana. Generally gives you a group of people who are at least somewhat similar to you. I can read Russian fine, which means I can catch cognates, and I know basic Russian, enough to get by like asking where things are, asking who someone is, saying what I like and don't like, stuff like that, but not enough to connect with natives on a deep level. Also, the university seems like they do put a lot of effort into helping the international students settle in there (translators if you have to go to the doctor, etc.)

The plan is no more naive than the thousands of people who fly to America from all over the world to go to university here while barely knowing the language. There are two groups of people here: I've generally had people who have visited Russia or live there encourage me to go, and then some people who tell me I'm crazy or naive.

Last edited by CuriousAboutRussia; 05-11-2019 at 09:54 PM..
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