U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Fine Arts
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-03-2013, 11:52 AM
 
2,483 posts, read 2,742,187 times
Reputation: 1111

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by baileyvpotter View Post
Curious would you consider these art?

Photorealism painting by Chuck Close
http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mc...rvn5o1_500.jpg

The portrait is made up of tiny squares (also a large painting)
http://www.blumandpoe.com/sites/defa...tions/CC19.jpg
The first one? Ugh!

The second one? Well, the color combination is great.

In other words, as you said, it's all a matter of taste. There is a lot hanging in museums that I'd not call art but evidently somebody judged it so. Beyond me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-03-2013, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Winston-Salem, NC
321 posts, read 442,894 times
Reputation: 205
Portraiture is a puzzle to me. A portrait doesn't necessarily say anything about the person, other than their appearance. It can be a purely aesthetic concern, and if such, what separates it from the bicycle illustration that started this thread? Seemingly only that the subject is anthropomorphic, that we can project things about ourselves onto the image of another human. This actually can be done with anything, but I personally don't have any subjective associations with bicycles, which is why I don't find myself caring about an illustration of one. "Art is subjective" is a true statement, both in that it varies from person to person, and in that we subjectively project our feelings onto any given work. Portraiture usually doesn't move me, although I may appreciate it for its historic value, the pageant of kings and queens throughout the ages who could afford the portraiture.

Is a death mask "Art," like Tutankhamun's gold head piece? Or is it ritual?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2013, 03:50 PM
 
4,878 posts, read 4,585,445 times
Reputation: 7270
Quote:
Originally Posted by bvanevery View Post
Is a death mask "Art," like Tutankhamun's gold head piece? Or is it ritual?
That is a debate that has been going on for ages. Artist or craftsman?
......and sure it has to do with religious rituals except most of the early artists/craftsmen
were unknown unlike Michelangelo (just one example of a famous artist during his time).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-10-2013, 03:42 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
19,446 posts, read 13,095,749 times
Reputation: 14154
Chuck Close, the painter of the second piece in Hazel's post, was a photorealist who painted huge portraits based on photos. Every painting was laid out in a grid, as were the photos, and he painted the stuff he saw in the photo's grid onto the corresponding large grid on the canvas.
The grids were not all squares. Sometimes they were diamond shaped, and sometimes rectangular.

Until he had a massive stroke.
He recovered partial use of his painting hand afterward, but is very impaired now. He didn't change his methods at all, but his hand could no longer achieve the fine control it had before, so he just did what he could do, resulting in a less hyper-realistic, but more visually interesting, work. He's now more popular than ever, and continues to work from a wheelchair daily.
Before the stroke, he would stand on an adjustable platform to accomplish his paintings. Now, the paintings are on a frame that moves the canvas up and down. There is a slot cut in his studio's floor so he can paint the top parts of the tall canvases. The canvas frame goes down into the floor below, and he raises them with an electric switch connected to a winch.

Hazel's link is a self portrait. While I don't know the exact size, it's about 8 feet tall or more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2013, 08:55 AM
 
4,878 posts, read 4,585,445 times
Reputation: 7270
Quote:
Originally Posted by baileyvpotter View Post
The first image I provided was CC early works. Then in 1988 he had a seizure which left him
paralyzed and even with therapy he was not able to paint as he did before. He then began
experimenting and his works evolved into small repetitive shapes of colors. The interplay
with the paintings is to walk back several feet and see an image of a person.
btw.....here's another link he did before his illness.

1.1: Chuck Close | Elisabeth Greenwood
Quote:
Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
Chuck Close, the painter of the second piece in Hazel's post, was a photorealist who painted huge portraits based on photos. Every painting was laid out in a grid, as were the photos, and he painted the stuff he saw in the photo's grid onto the corresponding large grid on the canvas.
The grids were not all squares. Sometimes they were diamond shaped, and sometimes rectangular.

Until he had a massive stroke.
He recovered partial use of his painting hand afterward, but is very impaired now. He didn't change his methods at all, but his hand could no longer achieve the fine control it had before, so he just did what he could do, resulting in a less hyper-realistic, but more visually interesting, work. He's now more popular than ever, and continues to work from a wheelchair daily.
Before the stroke, he would stand on an adjustable platform to accomplish his paintings. Now, the paintings are on a frame that moves the canvas up and down. There is a slot cut in his studio's floor so he can paint the top parts of the tall canvases. The canvas frame goes down into the floor below, and he raises them with an electric switch connected to a winch.

Drawing or painting using a grid is not uncommon nor is using a photograph (especially when using
people as the primary image since they move). He used the cell or square grid for his photorealism
portraits. What is interesting about his portraits is that he not only is paralyzed but suffers from
face blindness (where he is unable to recognize faces). His current works started in the hospital
& then at home. His wife brought materials to the hospital during his recovery and that was when
he began experimenting with the repetitive shapes enclosed with various colors that resulted in
the images we see in his work after his illness (spinal artery rupture).

Chuck Close Biography - Facts, Birthday, Life Story - Biography.com
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2013, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
19,446 posts, read 13,095,749 times
Reputation: 14154
Quote:
Originally Posted by baileyvpotter View Post
Drawing or painting using a grid is not uncommon nor is using a photograph (especially when using
people as the primary image since they move). He used the cell or square grid for his photorealism
portraits. What is interesting about his portraits is that he not only is paralyzed but suffers from
face blindness (where he is unable to recognize faces). His current works started in the hospital
& then at home. His wife brought materials to the hospital during his recovery and that was when
he began experimenting with the repetitive shapes enclosed with various colors that resulted in
the images we see in his work after his illness (spinal artery rupture).

Chuck Close Biography - Facts, Birthday, Life Story - Biography.com
Thanks for the extended info, bailey!
Yup. The camera lucida, the opaque projector, and photography have all been artist's tools forever. The human brain filters out much of what the eye perceives for survival; we all look at what our brains command us to look at, so photo realism is impossible without a fixed aid of some kind.

I admire Close's work both early and current, but I like his later work better. I'm sorry he lost so much physically, but I'm glad he found a new way and I would love to own a piece from any of his eras as a painter.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2013, 04:08 PM
 
4,878 posts, read 4,585,445 times
Reputation: 7270
^^^^if only.....it would be nice to own one. There are so many photographers that blow me away -
Sandy Skoglund is one and Scott Mutter's surrealistic black and white images (before photoshop).
On the link you have to look Close

Scott Mutter: A More Perfect World -- Online Exhibit from the American Museum of Photography
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2013, 04:13 PM
 
2,226 posts, read 1,682,056 times
Reputation: 893
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamplight View Post
I'll start by saying I've been drawing all my life, although I've never been especially knowledgeable in the subject of art. Most of my drawings are very mechanical in nature, almost like technical drawings but also a little different. I always get ideas for products, or designs, or inventions, and then I draw them out to kind of develop my idea. So really my drawings have always just been a tool I use to help me visualize ideas I have, usually for mechanical things like cars or bicycles. I've never really thought of them as art, necessarily, although I also don't think of them as blueprints either (although I've drawn blueprints as well; I used to be a drafter). So what do you think? Would you call this art? Or is this closer to a technical drawing?
Beautifully and artistically rendered technical drawing. Art is in the heart of the beholder anyway. Someone with an industrial or modern look in their home would probably find a place to hang it as art, someone more traditional wouldn't. I paint mostly florals, our clients would be different but places for everyone.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Fine Arts
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top