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Old 12-22-2011, 03:06 PM
 
5,799 posts, read 4,814,549 times
Reputation: 17499

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I've been thinking about this for awhile, then even more after watching (and being driven crazy by) "Work of Art" on Bravo.

Many modern works of fine art are ephemeral or large installations. Yes, they have a place in museums, but how could any individual with an ordinary income and an ordinary sized house ever have such fine art in or around their homes?

Do artists think about this as they create? Do critics think about this when evaluating art?

Yes, I understand that artists need to make what speaks to them, but it seems that much of what is created precludes most people from ever owning any fine art - or at least limits the kind of fine art most people can own.

For example, I can afford to collect small original woodcuts, which I love, but I can't figure out a way to own or install sculpture on my property. I'm not interested in small bronzes (blech) but I want a large Calderish piece in my backyard!

I wish I could have this conversation with many different artists. I may love and appreciate and want what you create, but I can't afford it and it won't fit into my house! Are you ok with this? Do you only want to speak to people who visit the limited # of museums that show your work?

"Public Art", whether formal as in public sculpture gardens, or informal as in graffitti, doesn't solve this problem.
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Old 12-24-2011, 02:44 PM
 
13,496 posts, read 13,975,028 times
Reputation: 11119
it is difficult to make art that is both creative and commercial at the same time. some artists work is made without a thought to commercial value, while some artist's work is just not commercial.
as to your sculpture for your yard, keep looking you will find something that will work and is affordable. good luck
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Old 03-19-2012, 12:05 AM
 
Location: Maryland
62 posts, read 138,103 times
Reputation: 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
I've been thinking about this for awhile, then even more after watching (and being driven crazy by) "Work of Art" on Bravo.

Many modern works of fine art are ephemeral or large installations. Yes, they have a place in museums, but how could any individual with an ordinary income and an ordinary sized house ever have such fine art in or around their homes?

Do artists think about this as they create? Do critics think about this when evaluating art?

Yes, I understand that artists need to make what speaks to them, but it seems that much of what is created precludes most people from ever owning any fine art - or at least limits the kind of fine art most people can own.

For example, I can afford to collect small original woodcuts, which I love, but I can't figure out a way to own or install sculpture on my property. I'm not interested in small bronzes (blech) but I want a large Calderish piece in my backyard!

I wish I could have this conversation with many different artists. I may love and appreciate and want what you create, but I can't afford it and it won't fit into my house! Are you ok with this? Do you only want to speak to people who visit the limited # of museums that show your work?

"Public Art", whether formal as in public sculpture gardens, or informal as in graffitti, doesn't solve this problem.
First, let me say that I like your username!

Second, I'd never heard of this show until I read your original post. Now, thanks to you and your post my girlfriend and I are now hooked on it. We're watching it on iTunes and are still in season 1 but are loving it immensely.

I agree with what your observations and have to say that I don't understand the dynamics of what's going on. I don't see how any organization can afford to pay for art that won't last or can't be resold and I don't understand how the artists themselves make a living. But then, there's so much I don't understand.

Again thanks for the post - I really love that show.
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Old 03-29-2012, 09:09 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,563 posts, read 42,724,437 times
Reputation: 57224
As for me, I love contemporary art, but as much as I might love to look at something in a museum, there are only a few things I would want to live with in my home.

I have been to the homes of collectors who buy too much and hang it all over the house. There is so much that nothing can really be appreciated, and it's as though the walls are screaming at you.
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Old 03-31-2012, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Florida
18,290 posts, read 18,539,506 times
Reputation: 20974
There's more very affordable excellant art available than you can imagine.
New and/or unknown artists sell their work cheaper than dirt until they develop a following.
Check online ...eBay,Etsy and many other places.
Those that sell for 'museum' prices all began as unknowns selling for peanuts.
I probably made much less than minimum wage if averaged out over the years I was selling and watched several eBay sellers prices rise from $9.99 to $900 who eventually left to sell in galleries for who knows how much.
Maybe you'll buy some cheap and hit it lucky with a 'rising star'
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Old 04-14-2012, 05:54 PM
 
5,532 posts, read 5,715,613 times
Reputation: 3146
We live in different times and culture and it doesn't make sense to judge contemporary art with yesteryear tools.
It can be seen in everything. Music is one such example:
I like listening to oldies on my favorite radio station. These songs were written in the 50s and 60s and people enjoy them 50 years or more later. Now lets look at contemporary rap, hiphop, etc. The current generation may enjoy this music, but nobody memorizes them. Can you sing them in the shower? The answer is probably not. This generation will not have "oldies" to enjoy 30 -40 years into the future.
Same with visual art. Artists aim at exhibits, galleries, museums and media outlets. These are their targets, not regular folks living rooms. I am convinced that not many installations, video art, etc. will survive to be admired 100 years from now, in the same way we look at a Cezanne.
The times, they are a'changin...
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