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Old 02-12-2013, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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We've long made it a habit to take our kids, starting when they were very little, to art and science museums. We are not art historians or even know that much about art but I think it is important for people to recognize the works and styles of the masters by young adulthood. This pictures says so much about how art can inspire young children.

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Old 02-12-2013, 06:25 PM
 
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Great question - - I can think of lots of reasons, but uppermost in my mind is to balance out the left brain right brain thing. Society and schools seem so driven by technical and practical skills. It has become incredibly old fashioned for schools and colleges to produce 'well-rounded' people or provide a 'liberal education'. When budget cuts are made it's usually the arts that go down the tubes. Instilling appreciation for creative arts, showing you find them of value just by going, is a gift they will have their whole lives. The ability to find joy in something beautiful, be inspired to take creative chances, will serve them well no matter where they find themselves latter on in life.
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Old 02-13-2013, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Matthews, NC
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It's probably good for them, but I know that some of them don't appreciate it given how they act up at the museum.
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Old 02-13-2013, 12:59 PM
 
Location: west mich
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It makes an impression.
My grade school class took a museum trip and the image of one painting stuck in my mind - knew nothing about it of course. Years later while leafing through art books, there it was - Van Gogh's Starry Night. The reason it stuck was probably due to the unusual technique.
MoMA | The Collection | Vincent van Gogh. The Starry Night. Saint Rémy, June 1889

Once a slight interest is established, one might say "I like that and I'd like to do it". Grade schools have art classes, and this helps pique the interest of students. Then once you try, you start to understand what creativity is, and that is useful throughout your life. It might be the difference between a career making use of creativity or one that doesn't.
MHB Blog » Importance of Creativity in the Workplace
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Old 02-13-2013, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Orlando
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I can see exposing them to these museums but if they fail to see the "value" of the "art", I see no reason to continue to force them to go.

I was taken to some of the premier art exhibits in the US throughout my childhood...I saw a bunch of paintings and objects that some called "art". Some I liked and some I didn't. I had and still have no interest what so ever as to who painted what when.

Example...I know what the Mona Lisa looks like....do I like the painting? No....I don't get the attraction.

I think art is subjective and kind of resent people telling me that I have to like something just because others have deemed the artist "important".
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Old 02-13-2013, 08:20 PM
 
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Some kids like it, some kids don't. Most people get an appreciation of it eventually though. Even though it is not all types of art. I think it is important to expose them to the process of creating art. It is SO good for the brain to engage in creativity. And great for eye / hand coordination something besides video games! And children's artwork is so fun to look at, so happy! Children love to create art. It is when they get into their jr. high/teens, many don't enjoy it anymore. The ipod and the cell phone rule all. It is sad.

And I think that many kids are not exposed to it, thus they don't even think about it. So yes, exposure is important, even if they don't "get it".

I take my daughter a lot, she loves it.
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Old 02-14-2013, 05:53 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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Exposure is key. I don't like what I see everywhere. I don't like modern art usually but I like to be exposed to so many different things in life. I think it broadens my general education and I owe it to my children to expose them to more than my small world. They should be exposed to opera, concerts, art in all forms not being forced to like it but being made aware it is there and to some people it is inspiring.

We even expose them to differing religious beliefs we hold so they can be aware of what is out there. All these things make for well rounded interesting people.
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Old 02-14-2013, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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I was asking myself the same question last week.

Why is there such an emphasis on taking your children to museums when you can show them 90% of the same stuff in a book or online?
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Old 02-14-2013, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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Well books should reinforce what you see in museums. And online can be used the same way. For example years ago there was a Norman Rockwell exhibit coming to the High Museum in Atlanta. We got art books out and online sources and had them read about Rockwell, the controversy about was commercial illustration really art, his final illness, etc. So they knew what we were going to see. But when they were actually in the museum and SAW the works of art---so much bigger than anything they could imagine in a book and online- it was a totally different experience. And it touched them in ways they did not experience in looking at reproductions.

My son was about 15 I think. My daughter got my attention "Look at MG". He was in front of the famous piece of the proud little black girl walking to school in Mississippi I think and being guarded by State Troopers and there were smashed tomatoes on the wall where she was walking. (first day of integration) and tears were running down his cheeks. It honestly touched him so much. He had seen that in books but seeing the look on that little girl's face touched him so much.

Going to The National Museum of Art in DC is a family experience we shared too which gave us all something special to remember. Just last week we took our 10 year old girls to the Nasher Art museum in Durham for a special exhibit to see an incredible exhibit amassed by two Baltimore sisters who led very unusual lives for their time. So we discussed the art, the sisters and history all at the same time. It broadened their education and experience.
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Old 02-14-2013, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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Also when we see art in person we can see texture, brush strokes, energy, depth, shadowing and shades, and most of all perspective. I saw pictures of the David a million times all my life but finally at age 24 I went to Florence Italy where I saw the real sculpture. I'll never forget walking into that room and seeing it for the first time. It took my breath away. I can't even imagine how a child would react to seeing David for the first time. it is huge, white and incredibly beautiful. You just can't get that from viewing a one dimensional PICTURE IN A BOOK. No picture can do it justice.

And everybody has heard about the Mona Lisa. It is deemed so important and popular that we tend to think of it as huge but in reality it is quite small and we tend to wonder what the fuss is all about. You just can't get that from viewing a one dimensional PICTURE IN A BOOK.
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