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Old 08-24-2013, 11:18 AM
 
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hmmm...Just throwing this out. Would there be any consideration to the argument that 'art' (fine art) perhaps has been hijacked by the well-off', 'aristos', 'elites', 'upper class', etc etc? Probably the only time those who are on the fringe with the activity and get 'involved' with it is when media notes that at a recent Sotheby's auction a Picasso has been sold for about 50 billion....;-)....Can we blame those who don't get involved in with art and don't know much about it that they perhaps associate it simply with the 'rich'??? Fact is 'art' theoretically is for 'everyman' to enjoy. One doesn't have to buy it. But, of course, it's probably more complicated than that.
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Old 08-24-2013, 12:11 PM
 
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Originally Posted by travric View Post
hmmm...Just throwing this out. Would there be any consideration to the argument that 'art' (fine art) perhaps has been hijacked by the well-off', 'aristos', 'elites', 'upper class', etc etc? Probably the only time those who are on the fringe with the activity and get 'involved' with it is when media notes that at a recent Sotheby's auction a Picasso has been sold for about 50 billion....;-)....Can we blame those who don't get involved in with art and don't know much about it that they perhaps associate it simply with the 'rich'??? Fact is 'art' theoretically is for 'everyman' to enjoy. One doesn't have to buy it. But, of course, it's probably more complicated than that.
While you are right that the wealthy are the main supporters of the art field (who else can pay a million dollars for a painting?), it really is more complicated than that. When we went to school, we had art, music, theatre, etc. Mostly, we had art appreciation although we played around with a few techniques. Now, as someone said, these extras have been removed from schools and it isn't always because of a shortage of funds. I remember when they were removed from the district where I was teaching and funds were plentiful back then. The excuse was that these are boring subjects and unnecessary to a good education. Many of us disagreed but that was neither here nor there. Even physical ed wwent by the board but sports stayed. Schools spend small fortunes on sports. I do see why but I still wonder about our sense of balance.

Then, there is the question of 'what is art?'. Anyone who has followed the history chronologically sees it, I'm sure. Isn't it just a signs of times? Cultures change and we move on?

I'd best stop but, yes, it is complicated. So much has changed and whether for the better or worse, I do not know.
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Old 08-24-2013, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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The definition of art changes with the times. Remember Norman Rockwell was considered too commercial to be a "real artist" as were many illustrators in the 20-30's.
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Old 08-24-2013, 08:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by travric View Post
hmmm...Just throwing this out. Would there be any consideration to the argument that 'art' (fine art) perhaps has been hijacked by the well-off', 'aristos', 'elites', 'upper class', etc etc? Probably the only time those who are on the fringe with the activity and get 'involved' with it is when media notes that at a recent Sotheby's auction a Picasso has been sold for about 50 billion....;-)....Can we blame those who don't get involved in with art and don't know much about it that they perhaps associate it simply with the 'rich'??? Fact is 'art' theoretically is for 'everyman' to enjoy. One doesn't have to buy it. But, of course, it's probably more complicated than that.
Art is for everyone to enjoy and it should be encouraged. After all, we judge ancient civilizations from
the art they left behind. What will future generations say about us?
Regarding the hijacking of the fine arts, all someone has to do is go to an art fair or a museum.
Even natural history museums will have work from artists (craftsmen) from tribal to Egyptian, Roman,
Asian etc...
People should also remember that the elites who buy multi-million dollar paintings probably never
would have bought a piece from Van Gogh who didn't sell a piece of work when he was alive.
His work as well as other Impressionists were disliked by many established artists as well as the
public. So it is very easy now to say you love Van Gogh, Dali, Picasso, Warhol, Pollock and others
now but there are many incredible pieces by unknowns available to all.
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Old 08-24-2013, 09:20 PM
 
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So it is very easy now to say you love Van Gogh, Dali, Picasso, Warhol, Pollock and others
now but there are many incredible pieces by unknowns available to all.
Absolutely. And I am always fascinated by those individuals who very early in an artist's career saw their work and said to themselves as well as to the world that there iss something 'special' about it. Their 'eye' apparently saw something others didn't. That's surely a gift....with ramifications!
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Old 08-25-2013, 06:48 AM
 
2,473 posts, read 2,729,125 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baileyvpotter View Post
Art is for everyone to enjoy and it should be encouraged. After all, we judge ancient civilizations from
the art they left behind. What will future generations say about us?
Regarding the hijacking of the fine arts, all someone has to do is go to an art fair or a museum.
Even natural history museums will have work from artists (craftsmen) from tribal to Egyptian, Roman,
Asian etc...
People should also remember that the elites who buy multi-million dollar paintings probably never
would have bought a piece from Van Gogh who didn't sell a piece of work when he was alive.
His work as well as other Impressionists were disliked by many established artists as well as the
public. So it is very easy now to say you love Van Gogh, Dali, Picasso, Warhol, Pollock and others
now but there are many incredible pieces by unknowns available to all.
In every field of endeavor, there are many whose work was totally unappreciated until after their deaths. One does wonder why.

We have an art gallery here - probably more than one but I know of one - that takes works of local artists who are just getting started, displays and sells them. The gallery owner's effort to help the artists get a start on a promising career.
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