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Old 09-10-2013, 08:34 PM
 
3,070 posts, read 4,181,706 times
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I'm sure that it could be fixed if they saw it and wanted it fixed. But this particular designer in question is not very skilled and hasn't done a check in all browsers. It must look fine in his browser so it is done as far as he is concerned.

You could send a note to the website explaining your frustration and ask them to fix it. They will most likely respond with a CYA explanation that they can't design for all browsers, but then they shouldn't be in the business.

One way for them to get around the shifting of the type and encroaching color blocks is to make their website with a "Fixed Width". Which means the width is one size only and doesn't change with any browser. Make if for the smallest browser and add a light background color to fill the page of the browsers that are bigger.

But apparently they don't even know that much, so eh, lost cause.
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Old 09-11-2013, 01:20 AM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
19,379 posts, read 13,050,331 times
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Originally Posted by Hazel W View Post
I do not understand any of that but I do know not to try to do something I know nothing about. Of course, they think they know all about it. Color means nothing to them. Only the 'how to put something on paper or monitor - the mechanics of the process. Could be they are totally color blind.
That's the problem. Far too many 'graphic designers' don't know a thing about the principles and mechanics of their profession these days.
They aren't color blind; they've simply had no good training. Graphic design is like a lot of professions that were once very arcane and full of touchy technicalities.

Computer software has done away with a lot of those skills that were once all mechanical and required a human's touch, but all of the software is based on those old skills. Far too many folks never learn all the basics that makes the software do what it's supposed to do. Their teachers don't even know the basics, so as often as not, students never are aware of what they don't know. Like you, giving them the very most basic stuff is total Greek to them.

I'm a geezer. I learned all this back in the day when colored films and x-acto knives were used. Back then, the guys who knew the chemistry and physics of generated or reflected color were the wizards, and could easily make 5 figure salaries. All that is gone forever, along with a lot of knowledge and skill that still applies.

Design is one of those fields that has always been, and will always be, half art and half engineering. Both art and engineering require lots of training to be superior, and both have always had folks who were able to just get by with a dedicated amateur approach that has just enough skill to be useful.
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Old 09-12-2013, 01:21 AM
 
3,070 posts, read 4,181,706 times
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Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
I learned all this back in the day when colored films and x-acto knives were used. Back then, the guys who knew the chemistry and physics of generated or reflected color were the wizards,
Uh, and gals! I used a lot of those chemicals to retouch transparencies. I love what the computer has conquered that used to take me all day, but Hail the x-acto knife with 11 blade and swivel on ruby!
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Old 09-17-2013, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
19,379 posts, read 13,050,331 times
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Originally Posted by Kayekaye View Post
Uh, and gals! I used a lot of those chemicals to retouch transparencies. I love what the computer has conquered that used to take me all day, but Hail the x-acto knife with 11 blade and swivel on ruby!
Yes, indeed! Women were often better than men at this work.

There's still a lot of work for the trusty X-Acto swivel knife. As long as there are airbrushes there will be swivel knives.
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Old 09-22-2013, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Windham County, VT
10,544 posts, read 4,685,486 times
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Originally Posted by Kayekaye View Post
There is no excuse for making type hard to read whether in print or online. My typographer instructor told us "The purpose of type is to be READ"
and I have never forgotten that. I can only think that these designers don't know the basics of color theory at all. It's a shame.
This^

I've encountered this "too much color, too little legibility" problem in Wired magazine, especially in the past.
I've had aggravating websites that use unwise color combos that obfuscate the text, and I wonder what they're thinking.
Not to mention, imagine how hopeless this (trying to read colored text on poorly distinguished background color) seems to people who are color blind-of which there are many.
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Old 09-22-2013, 09:17 AM
 
2,480 posts, read 2,735,508 times
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Originally Posted by cloven View Post
This^

I've encountered this "too much color, too little legibility" problem in Wired magazine, especially in the past.
I've had aggravating websites that use unwise color combos that obfuscate the text, and I wonder what they're thinking.
Not to mention, imagine how hopeless this (trying to read colored text on poorly distinguished background color) seems to people who are color blind-of which there are many.
I suspect they consider their "artistic creation" more important than what is written on it. Quite often the design plan of printing (color, etc.) is not done by the person who wrote the article who has no say in the matter. Just my suspicion. I know I once wrote to a magazine about this problem. The reply was something to the effect that colors attract readers.

I have a magazine in front of me right now that has an ad with white print on yellow background. No matter as I do not read the ads anyway.
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