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Old 08-24-2013, 02:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rubi3 View Post
Using the complement to a color is often used. It simply has to be done with care. I have a degree in color and direct those interested to check out the web.
Is there a better web site than the one I tried to read this morning where the sentences of the article spread across the dark colors of his color column? I had to give up. Try reading black print on dark blue background. That was only one.
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Old 08-24-2013, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Under the Redwoods
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Quote:
There is much more to painting than one realizes.
Yes! There is an unseen process that goes into any peace of art. And just seeing pictures of them does not do justice to seeing the actual piece.

I'm an art major late in life, but I have always been an artist and I just love color for what it is. I get to 'play' A LOT with color when I hand dye garments and fabric. Painting can go either way. If I have an image, then no play, color has to be just right. But abstracts are a play with color, and as you say, Rothco, or Kandinsky; it's about the color just as much as the composition.

One of my favorite artists is Henri Matisse. His use of color drew me in. He is one whose work really utilizes these complaintary color schemes. Look at his Goldfish painting, The Joy of Life and Woman with a Hat.
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Old 08-24-2013, 03:14 PM
 
Location: USA
7,778 posts, read 9,611,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hazel W View Post
Is there a better web site than the one I tried to read this morning where the sentences of the article spread across the dark colors of his color column? I had to give up. Try reading black print on dark blue background. That was only one.
What works for me if the print is dark or a dark background... select it and it will become white and easy to read. Earlier, I posted what I did because if I want to know something I would not ask a stranger. I would see what I could find on the net.

And, so far as having someone "explain" something about art and painting that has not been asked of them.... As my ex once said: There is nothing more embarrassing than to discover you've just explained something to the person who wrote the book. LOL
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Old 08-24-2013, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
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Actually , we're not talking about complimentary colors, we're talking about complementary colors.


Not trying to be nitpicky but I think that might be adding to the confusion. Complementary colors complete the color wheel.


wether they compliment each other is subjective.
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Old 08-24-2013, 03:30 PM
 
Location: SC
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Here's the easy version:

Complementary = opposites on the color wheel.

(I probably spelled that wrong)
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Old 08-24-2013, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Windham County, VT
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Chart/model from wikipedia (complementary colors on opposite sides from each other):
File:Color star-en.svg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 08-24-2013, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Pa
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pic of colorwheel - Google Search
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Old 08-25-2013, 06:36 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bmachina View Post
Here's the easy version:

Complementary = opposites on the color wheel.

(I probably spelled that wrong)
You're entitled. We knew what you meant.
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Old 08-25-2013, 08:03 AM
 
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http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/25/op...it_th_20130825

I am not referring to the article. That's another whole ball game. I am referring to the picture at the top. There are colors that blend. Very little of the primary colors, all toned with other shades - if that makes sense. Secondaries? Tertiaries? Or a blend with grays? How do they do that? Easy on the eyes. Yes?

Of course, that picture is no doubt computer-generated but I am thinking of the work an artist would need to get exactly the right shadings.

Do you like the colors there?
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Old 08-25-2013, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Under the Redwoods
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The picture looks like secondary, tertiary and some beyond- with tints (add white) and tones (add the complementry).
I like the colors use in the image.

Some people have an eye for color and don't give it much thought when they put colors together.
Sometimes artists will purposefully use a limited palette. Choosing three colors and only use those and anything that those mixed together would make.

It's a common mistake to add black to darken a color. If one is painting an image of a blue door and there is a shadow cast across it, the blue where the shadow is, is darkened by adding a small amount of orange.
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