U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Fine Arts
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-24-2013, 09:49 AM
 
2,473 posts, read 2,729,984 times
Reputation: 1095

Advertisements

I (and millions of other people) am finding out that much of what I learned is school isn't quite true. No news there. Just a question.

How do you know what a color's complement is? Evidently it is much more complicated than I was taught. Take the three primary colors. How do you know what their complementary colors are? From what I saw this morning, they are the colors that would not be involved in mixes. Red and blue make purple. Red and yellow make orange. No green involved in either. Green is the complementary color?

I know. I sound stupid to the well-informed artist but can you please explain how you know?

Thank you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-24-2013, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
15,564 posts, read 9,592,084 times
Reputation: 26011
complementary colors complete the color wheel.

the 3 basic colors are red, yellow and blue. (I think this came from when artists had to mix their own paints and used these 3 to make everything else but these colors couldn't be made. Not sure-will google that when I get time)

anyway, if you take red, mix the other 2-blue and yellow, you get green. Green is the complement of red.
orange is a mix of red and yellow, What's left? blue. Blue and orange are complements.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2013, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
15,564 posts, read 9,592,084 times
Reputation: 26011
oh, and the mixes are called secondary colors as they're made from mixing 2 colors.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2013, 12:19 PM
 
2,473 posts, read 2,729,984 times
Reputation: 1095
Quote:
Originally Posted by PAhippo View Post
complementary colors complete the color wheel.

the 3 basic colors are red, yellow and blue. (I think this came from when artists had to mix their own paints and used these 3 to make everything else but these colors couldn't be made. Not sure-will google that when I get time)

anyway, if you take red, mix the other 2-blue and yellow, you get green. Green is the complement of red.
orange is a mix of red and yellow, What's left? blue. Blue and orange are complements.

I see a glimmer of light there. Red/Yellow/Blue. Orange has red and yellow and there are the three primary colors. We used a wheel and drew lines and that's what I've lost. Not sure now that it worked anyway. Your way makes perfect sense. Thanks. Now to the statements from the article I was trying to read. But that is more about what your vision does.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2013, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Under the Redwoods
3,748 posts, read 5,815,409 times
Reputation: 5962
There are primary colors: red, blue and yellow. No mix of color can make these colors.
There are the secondary colors: the colors made from the primary: orange, green and violet (not purple, purple is a made up name from Crayola).
The opposite of red is green because it is made from blue and yellow. For blue it is orange, for yellow it is violet. These are the complimentary colors.
Then there are the tertiary colors- those that are found by mixing a primary and secondary: blue-green, yellow green, red-orange, yellow orange, red-violet, blue violet.
Anything that is opposite of a color will be the (straight) compliment.
But...then there is split compliment, double split compliment, triadic, and analogous (as well as monochromatic).
A split compliment would be- for example, red and green are complimentary, to make a split, take the two colors on either side of the green (for red) which would be yellow-green and blue green.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2013, 12:53 PM
 
2,473 posts, read 2,729,984 times
Reputation: 1095
Quote:
Originally Posted by OwlKaMyst View Post
There are primary colors: red, blue and yellow. No mix of color can make these colors.
There are the secondary colors: the colors made from the primary: orange, green and violet (not purple, purple is a made up name from Crayola).
The opposite of red is green because it is made from blue and yellow. For blue it is orange, for yellow it is violet. These are the complimentary colors.
Then there are the tertiary colors- those that are found by mixing a primary and secondary: blue-green, yellow green, red-orange, yellow orange, red-violet, blue violet.
Anything that is opposite of a color will be the (straight) compliment.
But...then there is split compliment, double split compliment, triadic, and analogous (as well as monochromatic).
A split compliment would be- for example, red and green are complimentary, to make a split, take the two colors on either side of the green (for red) which would be yellow-green and blue green.
Gets complicated, doesn't it. I don't know how well a primary and its complementary color blend but red and green together have never felt right to me. How did Christmas latch onto a combination of red and green? They clash. Does yellow and violet clash?

Another topic that is. Thanks much. I now know how it is done.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2013, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Under the Redwoods
3,748 posts, read 5,815,409 times
Reputation: 5962
I know what you mean by clash. I am not much on putting red and green together, it is just not appealing to me. However take a tint of red, which would be pink, and that goes rather well with green. I do like the combination of yellow and violet, as does Mother Nature. She puts the two together in many different flowers, pansies and iris are the two that come to mind right off the top of my head.
The blue and orange combination was very popular for interier design in the 60's.

It's a confusing thing, the English language. We take 'complimentary' to mean goes well together, and with color, sometimes it does. But at the same time, with color, there is contrast, which would 'indicate' a play 'against' each other. Darks and lights provide this contrast, but so do the complimentary colors.
Get right shade of orange next to the right shade of blue and we get a 'color vibration'. This is not just a term, but an actual visual effect. We mostly recognize this vibration from poorly designed websites. Ever come across a web page where the text jiggled on the background and was increadibly hard to read? That's the color vibration.

It can be a little confusing at first to get the idea of what color is opposite of another when all 12 colors are present. Having an actual color wheel makes it easier to reference, especially when getting into double split compliments and triadic color combinations of the tertiary colors.
One of my painting instructors says, an artist can never make too many color wheels. There are so many variations of pigment, cool and warm colors that when one goes to paint something, a color study that is making a wheel with the colors one thinks they may us is sometimes needed. It may be that the combination of primary colors chosen may not produce the values and intensity that the artist desires. With that one may choose to change the blue used, do another study and then like to looks.

Last edited by OwlKaMyst; 08-24-2013 at 01:55 PM.. Reason: Autocorrect is stupid
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2013, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Under the Redwoods
3,748 posts, read 5,815,409 times
Reputation: 5962
Oh- and I don't think the question about Christmas and red and green would need a new discussion. We are still talking compliments here.
I cannot say for sure how Christmas got that combination, but if I were to guess, Holly.
Holly has its dark green leaves with bright red berries. It is an old pagan tradition to bring in 'boughs of holly' into the home during the winter solstice.

If I was forced to decorate using the traditional red and green, I'd keep that dark forest green, a cool shade of the color as opposed to warm, and go with a deep cool red that has a touch of violet to get away from the 'firetruck' red.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2013, 02:15 PM
 
2,473 posts, read 2,729,984 times
Reputation: 1095
Quote:
Originally Posted by OwlKaMyst View Post
I know what you mean by clash. I am not much on putting red and green together, it is just not appealing to me. However take a tint of red, which would be pink, and that goes rather well with green. I do like the combination of yellow and violet, as does Mother Nature. She puts the two together in many different flowers, pansies and iris are the two that come to mind right off the top of my head.
The blue and orange combination was very popular for interier design in the 60's.

It's a confusing thing, the English language. We take 'complimentary' to mean goes well together, and with color, sometimes it does. But at the same time, with color, there is contrast, which would 'indicate' a play 'against' each other. Darks and lights provide this contrast, but so do the complimentary colors.
Get right shade of orange next to the right shade of blue and we get a 'color vibration'. This is not just a term, but an actual visual effect. We mostly recognize this vibration from poorly designed websites. Ever come across a web page where the text jiggled on the background and was increadibly hard to read? That's the color vibration.

It can be a little confusing at first to get the idea of what color is opposite of another when all 12 colors are present. Having an actual color wheel makes it easier to reference, especially when getting into double split compliments and triadic color combinations of the tertiary colors.
One of my painting instructors says, an artist can never make too many color wheels. There are so many variations of pigment, cool and warm colors that when one goes to paint something, a color study that is making a wheel with the colors one thinks they may us is sometimes needed. It may be that the combination of primary colors chosen may not produce the values and intensity that the artist desires. With that one may choose to change the blue used, do another study and then like to looks.
Right. It is probably the "pure" basic colors that don't blend. Or, maybe when they are both of the same shading (tone?). I hadn't thought of those little pansies but you are right. It's all in the shading, isn't it? There is much more to painting than one realizes. Much more. We look at painting differently once we are aware of these things. Maybe I could even come to appreciate Rothko. :-) He wanted us to see the colors and nothing more. We just look for pictures.

Zenobia in Chains is the same story. Not in color but in technique. Once you know what she did to Italian limestone to make it look like marble, the statue takes on a whole new meaning. It isn't what she sculpted but how she did it.

Thanks so very much.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2013, 02:23 PM
 
Location: USA
7,778 posts, read 9,611,706 times
Reputation: 11672
Using the complement to a color is often used. It simply has to be done with care. I have a degree in color and direct those interested to check out the web.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Fine Arts
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top