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Old 08-29-2013, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,437 posts, read 41,755,845 times
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I love it

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Old 09-25-2013, 09:12 AM
 
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Children who are exposed or take art (visual or performing) do much
better academically because art involves critical and higher order thinking.
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Old 10-17-2013, 09:22 PM
 
637 posts, read 960,138 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baileyvpotter View Post
Children who are exposed or take art (visual or performing) do much
better academically because art involves critical and higher order thinking.
I saw those "PSAs" on the blog of a successful portrait painter, and loved them!

I'm a big proponent of the arts and believe that involvement with art imparts a number of skills beyond just "art." But I'd like to see the data behind your statement, and would like to know what "much better" means. Better than their (same-IQ) peers who aren't involved in art? Better than they would otherwise have performed? Clearly there are plenty of very intelligent people who have no involvement in any kind of art who do very well academically. There are also many young artists who perform poorly in most academic subjects. It seems that there are too many uncontrollable factors to arrive at a conclusion which cannot be picked apart. I'm guessing the studies are along the lines of having one group of kids engage in some creative task, followed by an academic task, while the other group does not perform the creative task. Or, broad studies which do not control for socioeconomic background, general parental involvement and enrollment of the student in other enriching activities, etc..

The statement makes sense... but I doubt this has actually been proved (or even can be.)
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Old 10-19-2013, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
19,422 posts, read 13,081,647 times
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Art teaches kids a lot of stuff.
Sustained concentration, close observational skills, eye and hand coordination, patience, focusing on details, and manipulating materials are just a few things that can be applied generally. Advanced art can involve a child in many areas that aren't always obvious; basic carpentry, basic chemistry, use of hand and power tools, basic soldering and welding, color training, setting goals, history, idea conception, constructing useful internal dialogs, and lots of others.

I've been a lifelong artist. It's true that people who pursue the arts- and I include music, dancing, and all the others- do oftentimes do poorly in some subjects, particularly math, but that is far from universally true. There are artists who are very mathematical in their work, and folks who are very good mathematicians who enjoy art as an amateur pursuit.

I believe all learning is tightly entertained with an individual's mentality, natural abilities, and natural interests. Art can open doors to those who are not naturally artistic, but artists have to find a connection between subjects that don't come natural to them; math and science can be tied closely to art, but a teacher needs to show a child the connections.
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Old 10-19-2013, 09:20 AM
 
5,640 posts, read 16,954,719 times
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EXACTLY - the schools are always pushing participation in music and drama for the same reasons. Different ways of thinking makes students smarter. You have to wonder what U.S. students are going to turn out long term now that schools are pushing the use of computer so much. No more cursive etc. Their hand eye coordination skills are gonna be amiss.

I find it amazing that some kids just HATE to draw. But many kids LOVE it and are not given enough opportunities to do so. Many parents are so sports-scholarship centric in their thinking. There should be more art & music & drama scholarships offered

You are right, it is a lifelong pursuit for enjoyment, no one said you have to make a living at it. It is mental health therapy
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Old 10-19-2013, 11:33 AM
 
4,878 posts, read 4,581,871 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cowbell76 View Post
I saw those "PSAs" on the blog of a successful portrait painter, and loved them!

I'm a big proponent of the arts and believe that involvement with art imparts a number of skills beyond just "art." But I'd like to see the data behind your statement, and would like to know what "much better" means. Better than their (same-IQ) peers who aren't involved in art? Better than they would otherwise have performed? Clearly there are plenty of very intelligent people who have no involvement in any kind of art who do very well academically. There are also many young artists who perform poorly in most academic subjects. It seems that there are too many uncontrollable factors to arrive at a conclusion which cannot be picked apart. I'm guessing the studies are along the lines of having one group of kids engage in some creative task, followed by an academic task, while the other group does not perform the creative task. Or, broad studies which do not control for socioeconomic background, general parental involvement and enrollment of the student in other enriching activities, etc..

The statement makes sense... but I doubt this has actually been proved (or even can be.)
Provided 3 links and didn't even include The Nation at Risk (1982) report.
No one is disputing the importance of academics but the NAR concluded that the arts and humanities were
essential as well. Also regarding socioeconomic's, including the arts and humanities does have a significant
impact from grades K-12 and even into college.

How Arts Training Improves Attention and Cognition - Dana Foundation

Arts and Smarts | Greater Good

Talking Points
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