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Old 09-11-2013, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Funky Town
15,926 posts, read 7,011,897 times
Reputation: 58541

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Quote:
Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
A balloon twister is nothing at all the same as a glass blower. The only similarity is both are working in a transparent 3D medium.

Who knows? There was a time when glass blowing was a lot like balloons- both were always round and both were stretched, bent and twisted. Chihuly took glass blowing into a completely different direction. He made glass completely sculptural, once territory that was reserved only for metal, and he did it in a totally abstract manner. His works may remind a viewer of many organic things, but it never resembles any of those things.

For sure, it's territory that a balloon artist can never approach now, and will never be able to approach until balloons reach the permanence of fine art and are treated and considered as fine art.

Look at those pieces from the Mayo clinic. How in the word did Chihuly ever devise a way for them to stay intact while they cooled down? They were all once around 3000 degrees! Each one weighs well over 100 pounds!

The guy has an ego. He earned it. Maybe that was the lady's problem.

His work is just as visually challenging as any abstractionist's, and done in a medium that is much more physically challenging. Glass blowing is truly a combination of very ancient and very modern technology working side by side in equal tandem.

It's the same challenge abstraction brought to painters, photographers and sculptors 100 years ago. old technology made it easy for early abstractionists, but glass needed a higher level of glass technology, both in the material and how it was manipulated, before it could catch up to the others.

Chihuly's work depends a lot on glass that didn't exist as far back as the 1980's. That's a wink of an eye compared to oil paint, which hasn't changed very much since it's perfection almost 200 years ago.

His work also depends on modern kilns designed to handle exotic glass mixtures, advanced gas mixtures, modern technology used in ancient blowpipe designs, and lots of other stuff that has never existed for very long. He is a pioneer. In decades to come, he will be like Picasso, a revolutionary old/new master who will never be surpassed in his own thing, but will be surpassed in his material's abilities of new usage.
Thanks BanjoMike for the humorous analogy to the balloon twister. It made me laugh, as I am a latex sculptress as well!!!

I do get that Chihuly has taken the art of glass to a whole new level and has expanded it both figuratively and literally.



Quote:
Originally Posted by bailey potter View Post
He was a pioneer working with glass and this type of glass work was something completely
outside the norm for glass. As time passed, he (as many famous artists do) had a group
of glass makers who followed his instructions and designs who now make these sculptures
of glass. That may be one reason why some dislike him since he has a crew that does
the pieces instead of the artist (the assembly line approach).
As in the case of so many artists' that put their designs on paper, and have crews to assemble the finished work. I really don't give a flip how or who assembles the finished pieces. I'm in awe of the artist whose imagination created the design.
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Old 09-11-2013, 12:22 PM
 
4,877 posts, read 4,562,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetie Pie View Post
As in the case of so many artists' that put their designs on paper, and have crews to assemble the finished work. I really don't give a flip how or who assembles the finished pieces. I'm in awe of the artist whose imagination created the design.
I do not disagree with you, he revolutionized the art of blowing glass. I saw his work at the SOFA
exhibits many years ago and his work at the Garfield Park Conservatory (a link below).
Regarding the "flip" that was directed to a post of - why - some may not like him....that's all.
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Old 09-11-2013, 12:24 PM
 
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Here's the link of chihuly's pieces at the conservatory

Dale Chihuly - Artist - PALM HOUSE PEACOCK BLUE TOWER
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Old 09-11-2013, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Funky Town
15,926 posts, read 7,011,897 times
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Thank you for that link, baileyvpotter. I saw so much that I had not seen before. You are so lucky you got to see Garfield Park, what an incredible installation!

I haven't gone through the whole sight as of yet, there's too much to see and read. I surely will when I have enough time to do so. Once again, thank you.
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Old 09-12-2013, 12:16 AM
 
3,070 posts, read 4,170,562 times
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There are plenty of people that don't like his style, not me, but plenty. I know several, even an architect I know hates him and he is from Washington, just tired of seeing it I guess. I think they are just spectacular and fun.

Sweetie Pie have you tried any Chihuly-like latex sculptures? I know it probably wouldn't turn out exactly the same but it would be fun to try.
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Old 09-12-2013, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Funky Town
15,926 posts, read 7,011,897 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayekaye View Post
There are plenty of people that don't like his style, not me, but plenty. I know several, even an architect I know hates him and he is from Washington, just tired of seeing it I guess. I think they are just spectacular and fun.

Sweetie Pie have you tried any Chihuly-like latex sculptures? I know it probably wouldn't turn out exactly the same but it would be fun to try.


LoL Kaye.. Never have, but might give it a shot.
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Old 09-18-2013, 03:51 AM
 
Location: Henderson, NV, U.S.A.
9,665 posts, read 5,661,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I also saw his work at the Bellagio in Las Vegas several years ago.
It's amazing. Like lying on the bottom of the ocean and looking up to see the jellyfish.
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Old 09-22-2013, 05:38 AM
 
2,473 posts, read 2,729,125 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
His work also depends on modern kilns designed to handle exotic glass mixtures, advanced gas mixtures, modern technology used in ancient blowpipe designs, and lots of other stuff that has never existed for very long. He is a pioneer. In decades to come, he will be like Picasso, a revolutionary old/new master who will never be surpassed in his own thing, but will be surpassed in his material's abilities of new usage.
Banjomike, I don't mind at all showing my ignorance if I can learn something. I have often wondered how glass blowers get the glass liquid enough to form and you may be telling me here. Please explain how the kilns are used in glass art.

Many, many years ago, I used to watch the glass blowers on Olvera Street in Los Angeles. Most were just blowing the same things over and over. We all see them in kiosks at Christmas time. But, there was one fellow there who would form anything you asked him to. In other words, he wasn't wedded to ships and angels identical to what all his neighbors were doing. He could really create.

Long ago. I await your lesson about the kilns and thank you.
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Old 09-22-2013, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Windham County, VT
10,542 posts, read 4,675,530 times
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I've enjoyed what I've seen of Chihuly's work in specials aired on PBS since the late 1990's or so.
I enjoy abstract yet roughly symmetrical assemblages, such as the chandeliers made of what look like glass bananas or giant blue talons.
The jellies, where one walks under glass panel allowing the overhead lights to shine through the artworks, are nifty too.
Have never been able to see any of these in person, but I like the look of them, from what I've seen secondhand.
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Old 09-25-2013, 09:44 PM
 
5,799 posts, read 4,810,185 times
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I love and adore that bridge of his - in Tacoma, not Seattle. Unless there's one in Seattle too??
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