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Old 08-13-2007, 06:27 AM
 
25,455 posts, read 23,273,196 times
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Renior = Girl with the Watering Can, Recovery of the Self

Dante Gabrial Rossetti

John Singer Sargent

Gustav Caillebotte

Ernest Lawson

Gustav Klimt

Waterhouse = Soul of the Rose, Miranda the Tempest

Herring = Pharoah's Horses

and so many more.....
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Old 08-13-2007, 08:27 AM
 
5,640 posts, read 16,926,779 times
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Starry Night: van gogh, I have the print on my bedroom wall. Van gogh is one of my favorite artists.
Monet - many of his paintings
Berthe Morisot - the creche (in english: the cradle)
Being a mom... I like Mary cassatt paintings.
i have one: The haymakers, by Frederick Morgan print that I really like.
I like Peter Max

I have lots of artwork which I rotate (I have an art degree). I appreciate many different styles.
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Old 08-13-2007, 10:06 AM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
54,145 posts, read 38,225,022 times
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Just one?

I can't even pick a favorite artist, never mind a favorite painting but....

Van Gogh
O'Keefe
Dali
El Greco
Matisse
Monet
Magritte
Munch

They'd all be in the running among others
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Old 08-13-2007, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Warwick, NY
1,173 posts, read 5,430,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooseketeer View Post
Seurat's "Sunday aftertoon at la Grande Jatte", Caillebotte's "Rainy day"
Quote:
Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
John Singer Sargent, Gustav Caillebotte
At the risk of turning this thread into a mutual admiration society, I think these are also two great choices.

I confess to underestimating la Grande Jatte and Seurat's work previous to see la Grande Jatte (1884) in Chicago. As soon as I came upon it, I was overwhelmed by how enormous it is and knew immediately Seurat deserves a better reputation than he has (which is still excellent). This painitng is as special as it is large. I considered adding this work to my list. It stands out so remarkably and uniquely. The post-impressionist period was full of such dynamic change and experimentation. I almost wish pointilism had continued to develop.



Gustav Caillebotte's Rainy Day (1877) is brilliant. Look at the hue of the faces as they transition from cloudy light to heavily filtered light of the umbrella, how the streets fade into a foggy gray mist, how the light appears to be emerging just toward the end of a rain storm. These umbrellas will be put away in a few minutes as people hurry by, never to make this scene again. Yet another of the underrated impressionists.



John Singer Sargent is something like the embarrassing performing relative everyone tolerates except he really had talent. Many great artists came from wealthy families and Sargent's pedigree was such that he was an insider to the Gilded Age. He catered to a very narrow end of high society, getting commissions because everyone who was anyone was getting a portrait by Sargent. Save for a few of his truly visionary clients, I highly doubt they had a clue just how good he was. His people are certainly beautiful, elegantly dressed, usually posed among trappings of wealth; yet Sargent captures much about them perhaps too honestly for his patrons. In Madame X (1884) we see a vain, homely woman clearly imagining herself to be more noble and beautiful than she is.



Lady Agnew of Lochnaw (1893) peers out from under her brow with a look bordering on contempt. She is confident, calculating, likely not someone to be crossed. Her ease displays the assurance of her social status that the preening Madame X clearly does not have.

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Old 08-13-2007, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,036 posts, read 21,516,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason_Els View Post
At the risk of turning this thread into a mutual admiration society, I think these are also two great choices.

I confess to underestimating la Grande Jatte and Seurat's work previous to see la Grande Jatte (1884) in Chicago. As soon as I came upon it, I was overwhelmed by how enormous it is and knew immediately Seurat deserves a better reputation than he has (which is still excellent). This painitng is as special as it is large. I considered adding this work to my list. It stands out so remarkably and uniquely. The post-impressionist period was full of such dynamic change and experimentation. I almost wish pointilism had continued to develop.



Gustav Caillebotte's Rainy Day (1877) is brilliant. Look at the hue of the faces as they transition from cloudy light to heavily filtered light of the umbrella, how the streets fade into a foggy gray mist, how the light appears to be emerging just toward the end of a rain storm. These umbrellas will be put away in a few minutes as people hurry by, never to make this scene again. Yet another of the underrated impressionists.



John Singer Sargent is something like the embarrassing performing relative everyone tolerates except he really had talent. Many great artists came from wealthy families and Sargent's pedigree was such that he was an insider to the Gilded Age. He catered to a very narrow end of high society, getting commissions because everyone who was anyone was getting a portrait by Sargent. Save for a few of his truly visionary clients, I highly doubt they had a clue just how good he was. His people are certainly beautiful, elegantly dressed, usually posed among trappings of wealth; yet Sargent captures much about them perhaps too honestly for his patrons. In Madame X (1884) we see a vain, homely woman clearly imagining herself to be more noble and beautiful than she is.



Lady Agnew of Lochnaw (1893) peers out from under her brow with a look bordering on contempt. She is confident, calculating, likely not someone to be crossed. Her ease displays the assurance of her social status that the preening Madame X clearly does not have.

http://a1.vox.com/6a00b8ea0716eb1bc000cd970273
194cd5-500pi (broken link)

Jason, Jason, you chose two of some of my favourite portraits , how did you know ?

I don't know about you but there is so much fantastic art out there choosing just a few really isn't possible. I feel I betray so many great Artists by picking some and leaving out others.

Art to me is something which moves me , inspires me, makes me smile or frown and makes me think. It lifts me above my petty daily concerns and enables me to see the world through different eyes and from different perspectives and in my opinion is a grossly under appreciated as an invaluable part of our cultures and an innate part of our shared humanity.

I for example adore Prehistoric painted caves in Southern France and Spain ( some of them as old as 35 000 years old) and all of them are not only truly beautiful but a touching eye opener as to why we are much closer to our ancestors than we would like to believe.

We consider them primitive and yet such beauty and clever use of relief and colour is just truly wonderful.
I feel the same about "Native" art from all over the world and I find it very humbling.
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Old 08-13-2007, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Santa Monica
4,708 posts, read 7,561,052 times
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After walking around practically the entire MOMA in NYC in one visit, I came up a set of stairs and just ahead was Picasso's "Girl Before a Mirror." It was the most impressive painting I saw in person in the whole building. Reproductions don't do justice to the lines, the purple, the colors and color contrasts, etc.
Pablo Picasso. Girl Before a Mirror.- Olga's Gallery

But I think my favorite painting is Duchamp's "Nude Descending a Staircase." Absolutely brilliant.
Nude Descending a Staircase - Marcel Duchamp - Surrealism - Artwork

Last edited by ParkTwain; 08-13-2007 at 02:41 PM..
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Old 08-13-2007, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Warwick, NY
1,173 posts, read 5,430,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooseketeer View Post
Jason, Jason, you chose two of some of my favourite portraits , how did you know ?
You have a good eye and seeing as our other tastes are so similar, I confess it must have been luck.

Quote:
I feel the same about "Native" art from all over the world and I find it very humbling.
Indeed to all the above. As the Metroplitan is one of the world-class museum to which I have the most access, it seems to contain many favorites. One place I used to love was the old Mesopotamian galleries. Nobody ever went in there, but the abundance of large stone figures and dark lighting made it a cool oasis in the summer. This was art at the dawn of civilization and in the old days you could run your hand over the enormous cuneiform slabs at the entrance of the gallery, literally touching the first known writing ever. What struck me, besides the giant lammasu, were the wide-eyed adorant figures. They made me feel very small and humble in a world I did not understand. So often in antiquities we see art devoted to the Ozymandian pursuits of war, glory, or deification but these were nothing like that. These were simple figures, pleading, awed, and attentive to their gods. They were like children. It occured to me then how human the Mesopotamians were. They weren't chiseled figures out of history books, just everyday people with the same things in common as we 4700 years later:

Male Adorant by anonymous (27502600 B.C)
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Old 08-13-2007, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
404 posts, read 513,476 times
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Blue Scene: Painted by my grandma. Is currently in a gallery waiting for a buyer.
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Old 08-13-2007, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Warwick, NY
1,173 posts, read 5,430,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ParkTwain View Post
After walking around practically the entire MOMA in NYC in one visit, I came up a set of stairs and just ahead was Picasso's "Girl Before a Mirror." It was the most impressive painting I saw in person in the whole building. Reproductions don't do justice to the lines, the purple, the colors and color contrasts, etc.
Pablo Picasso. Girl Before a Mirror.- Olga's Gallery
I confess to not like much of Picasso (can't stand the dour Blue Period) but this one I like because it's so colorful. I see a lot of Matisse in this image. Picasso had an exceptional eye for translating movement into static work and I love how he paints the mirror image as what appears to be her own self-image.

Quote:
But I think my favorite painting is Duchamp's "Nude Descending a Staircase." Absolutely brilliant.

Nude Descending a Staircase - Marcel Duchamp - Surrealism - Artwork
To be sure. Nude Descending A Staircase just about put Cubism on the map. It's importance to abstract art is enormous. Here Duchamp captures the movement of the descent all in one single image. It's bullet time on canvas. This is yet another painting that was hated when it debuted, The New York Times called it, "An explosion in a shingle factory." Even other Cubists didn't like it, however as time progressed, it's seminal influence couldn't be denied. It's a masterpiece important as much for its content as for its context in the history of art.

Excellent choices.
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Old 08-13-2007, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Warwick, NY
1,173 posts, read 5,430,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thepizzaguy View Post
Blue Scene: Painted by my grandma. Is currently in a gallery waiting for a buyer.
Have a link to it? And have you considered buying it?
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