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Old 08-13-2007, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Blankity-blank!
11,449 posts, read 13,913,395 times
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I liked reading all the posts to see how many great artists and paintings were named. It really is difficult to name just one favorite painting.
Like Mooseketeer I also admired la Grande Jatte and Rainy Day. I spent over 30 years living in Chicago and, during the early 70s, went to the Art Institute about three times every month (Thursdays were free entry). It was great to be able to view the originals countless times, and each time was a thrill. Very often I stood in front of Rainy day and wanted to walk into that time and the city. Upon my first visit to Paris I made a walking tour to the intersection (near Gare St Lazare) where Rainy Day was painted and made photos from all corners.

I also like the paintings by Sisley and Pissarro.
So far no one has mentioned any Outsider artists. From those I very much like the works of Friedrich Schroeder-Sonnenstern.

Last edited by Visvaldis; 08-13-2007 at 03:30 PM.. Reason: gotta spell correctly!
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Old 08-13-2007, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Warwick, NY
1,173 posts, read 5,430,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Visvaldis View Post
So far no one has mentioned any Outsider artists. From those I very much like the works of Friedrich Schroeder-Sonnenstern.
Funny you should mention that. My town, Warwick, was home to one such artist, Frederick Franck. He created an outdoor sculpture garden and a multi-purpose building he described as, "a meditation retreat," and named it Pacem in Terris. They host concerts and lectures but the seating is all on hard stone. My grandfather disliked attending events there calling it, "Pack 'em on the terrace." .
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Old 08-13-2007, 04:17 PM
 
960 posts, read 1,297,445 times
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My favorite paintings are the ones I got to see each day (many moons ago), when I went to school and worked at the Art Institute of Chicago.

They are:

Lovis Corinth "Self-Portrait" 1917 - It's like butta, you can see what his massive stroke did to him, but I think it made him into a better painter.
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/citi/images/standard/WebLarge/WebImg_000004/4097_185301.jpg (broken link)

Charles Emile Chapmartin "Study of the Head of a Corpse" 1918 - Absolutely beautiful, in spite of the subject matter... that's very hard to accomplish.
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/citi/images/standard/WebLarge/WebImg_000003/2046_184739.jpg (broken link)

Rembrandt van Rijn "Young Woman at Half Open Door" 1645 - Just something about those shadows....gorgeous.
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/citi/images/standard/WebLarge/WebImg_000002/207_184577.jpg (broken link)

Jules Breton "The Song of the Lark" 1884 - Real quiet strength.
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/citi/images/standard/WebLarge/WebImg_000002/211_184580.jpg (broken link)

I've been to many museums and galleries over the years, and it's funny...none have compared to the ones I have listed. I guess it's all those hours I got to spend time alone with them, before the museum opened and after it closed.

Last edited by Carbondated; 08-13-2007 at 04:35 PM.. Reason: url entries
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Old 08-13-2007, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Warwick, NY
1,173 posts, read 5,430,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carbondated View Post
My favorite paintings are the ones I got to see each day (many moons ago), when I went to school and worked at the Art Institute of Chicago.

They are:

Lovis Corinth "Self-Portrait" 1917 - It's like butta, you can see what his massive stroke did to him, but I think it made him into a better painter.
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/citi/images/standard/WebLarge/WebImg_000004/4097_185301.jpg (broken link)

Charles Emile Chapmartin "Study of the Head of a Corpse" 1918 - Absolutely beautiful, in spite of the subject matter... that's very hard to accomplish.
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/citi/images/standard/WebLarge/WebImg_000003/2046_184739.jpg (broken link)

Rembrandt van Rijn "Young Woman at Half Open Door" 1645 - Just something about those shadows....gorgeous.
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/citi/images/standard/WebLarge/WebImg_000002/207_184577.jpg (broken link)

Jules Breton "The Song of the Lark" 1884 - Real quiet strength.
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/citi/images/standard/WebLarge/WebImg_000002/211_184580.jpg (broken link)

I've been to many museums and galleries over the years, and it's funny...none have compared to the ones I have listed. I guess it's all those hours I got to spend time alone with them, before the museum opened and after it closed.
Lucky you! Thank you for introducing me to these. I may have seen them before in Chicago, but don't remember them as it was ages ago. I particularly love the Rembrandt. The look on her face is priceless.

The Lovis Corinth portrait reminds me a great deal of a Rembrandt self-portrait:

Self Portrait with Beret (ca. 1659)
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Old 08-13-2007, 06:22 PM
 
960 posts, read 1,297,445 times
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Jason_Els you are absolutely correct in seeing the similarities between Rembrandt and Lovis Corinth's self portraits. Corinth was influenced by Rembrandts work and it is very noticable in the particular self portrait I linked. Something they both share in these self portraits is the ability to "stare past the viewer"...absolutely gripping when viewing it in real life.
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Old 08-14-2007, 05:54 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
2,657 posts, read 7,002,959 times
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I became a fan of Lee Teter's work a few years back when I purchased "Shades of Death".
Shades of Death by Lee Teter (http://www.hrosecure.com/firstclass/store08/product297.html - broken link)

Something about that painting brought me to tears; perhaps an intense discussion I'd just had with some friends about the war in Iraq. Several people I knew were there (all returned home safely, thanks Be) and I found myself seeing this as a painting that could be applied throughout all wars: a mortally wounded fighter being comforted by his soldier-comrade; the comrade anguished at losing a brother.

I later researched the artist. For those who are fans of the movie "Last of the Mohicans", Teter was a visual consultant on the film. This article details the man quite well as well as discussing what is probably his best known work "Reflections"
Vietnam Reflections - VVA Chapter 172 (broken link)



As I scrape my pennies together, I slowly add his works My latest purchase is A Perfect Day by Lee Teter (http://www.hrosecure.com/firstclass/store08/product563.html - broken link) If I ever reach a point in sappy sentimentality, I'll buy Through Lovers' Eyes (broken link)
though that seems a little too Norman Rockwell-y for my taste I prefer something more robust, like The Reminder, by Lee Teter (http://www.hrosecure.com/firstclass/store08/product819.html - broken link)
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Old 08-14-2007, 09:47 PM
 
103 posts, read 358,836 times
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I like Leonardo DaVinci too,espcially his Mona Liza.I must say it is one of the most excellent painting all over the world!
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Old 08-14-2007, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Warwick, NY
1,173 posts, read 5,430,439 times
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Speaking of which, if you haven't seen the MOBA, you should. It has a surprisingly good online collection. Among it's magnificent, if eclectic, collection are such memorable pieces as:

Lucy in the Field with Flowers (1968) by Unknown


and

Mama and Babe (1995) by Sarah Irani

Last edited by Jason_Els; 08-14-2007 at 10:58 PM..
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Old 08-15-2007, 06:28 AM
 
960 posts, read 1,297,445 times
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LMAO I love those paintings from the bad art collection!!! Wish I had a few in my home! .
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Old 08-18-2007, 11:23 PM
 
Location: Leaving Florida soon. Woo Hoo
174 posts, read 606,584 times
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Most anything from the French Impressionists, all of the prints in my home are from the founders and post impressionists. I would have to say my favorite though is Monet where my hubby's is Van Gogh.
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