U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Fine Arts
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Norman Rockwell Painter or Illustrator ?
Painter 2 50.00%
Illustrator 2 50.00%
Voters: 4. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-25-2017, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
1,387 posts, read 600,855 times
Reputation: 2723

Advertisements

He was anything but a realist. Due in part to the demands of his patrons, his body of work is principally a celebration of dreamy smarm and kitsch from a Pollyanna world of totem ideals that never really existed.

Last edited by 17thAndK; 08-25-2017 at 11:28 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-25-2017, 05:13 PM
 
13,758 posts, read 4,072,270 times
Reputation: 5019
Quote:
Originally Posted by 17thAndK View Post
He was anything but a realist. Due in part to the demands of his patrons, his body of work is principally a celebration of dreamy smarm and kitsch from a Pollyanna world of totem ideals that never really existed.

I disagree..........




Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2017, 07:42 AM
 
25,454 posts, read 23,266,873 times
Reputation: 15310
Quote:
Originally Posted by G1.. View Post
I disagree..........



gripping
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2017, 07:48 AM
 
4,931 posts, read 4,639,782 times
Reputation: 9157
Quote:
Originally Posted by 17thAndK View Post
He was anything but a realist. Due in part to the demands of his patrons, his body of work is principally a celebration of dreamy smarm and kitsch from a Pollyanna world of totem ideals that never really existed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by G1.. View Post
I disagree..........




You're both right. He was certainly good at the technical aspects of his art, and was capable of some very moving works, but entirely too much of his work consisted of portraying people as bumpkins and hayseeds, all looking like they're saying "Garsh!".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2017, 08:01 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,531 posts, read 42,694,765 times
Reputation: 57184
Quote:
Originally Posted by P47P47 View Post
You're both right. He was certainly good at the technical aspects of his art, and was capable of some very moving works, but entirely too much of his work consisted of portraying people as bumpkins and hayseeds, all looking like they're saying "Garsh!".
I happen to like his approach to the world. What's wrong with bumpkins and hayseeds? I grew up in the 1950s in MA, and my world was exactly like that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2017, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
1,387 posts, read 600,855 times
Reputation: 2723
Quote:
Originally Posted by G1.. View Post
I disagree...
Not a problem, but the images you posted are from after his long "Saccharine" period working for the Boy Scouts and Saturday Evening Post.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2017, 06:38 PM
 
13,758 posts, read 4,072,270 times
Reputation: 5019
Quote:
Originally Posted by 17thAndK View Post
Not a problem, but the images you posted are from after his long "Saccharine" period working for the Boy Scouts and Saturday Evening Post.
With all due respect so what?The complaint was about his only "happy time"images"being anything but a realist"and I used two example of serious "present day(his day) issues he was addressing."Being real.

Last edited by G1..; 08-26-2017 at 06:48 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2017, 06:45 PM
 
13,758 posts, read 4,072,270 times
Reputation: 5019
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
I happen to like his approach to the world. What's wrong with bumpkins and hayseeds? I grew up in the 1950s in MA, and my world was exactly like that.

People don't get that ! I spent my youth in Mass from 1961 through 1975 in and around Stockbridge and those people were real.Arlo Guthrie tells a great story about the making of the movie "Alice's Restaurant",Arlo could not understand why anyone would want to make a movie about his song and the Director Arthur Penn,said it was becuase he lived in Stockbridge and those are real people ,he knew them all!Yes he had them as models but Mr. Rockwell knew how to make a picture tell a story,you didn't have to guess!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2017, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
19,357 posts, read 13,010,410 times
Reputation: 14063
Quote:
Originally Posted by 17thAndK View Post
He was anything but a realist. Due in part to the demands of his patrons, his body of work is principally a celebration of dreamy smarm and kitsch from a Pollyanna world of totem ideals that never really existed.
That's true, especially in his early years.
When Rockwell began, and he began very young, as he was only 19 when he sold his first illustration, there was intense competition among the artists who created the covers and internal illustrations for America's most popular magazines.

Those magazines did not want controversy. At all. Rockwell entered the market at a time when there was a great wave of nostalgia for the 1890s, one of those Golden Age decades, and as a working artist, he had a young family to feed, so he developed several kitschy themes that always got him another cover job; the boy fishing with his dog, and/or his friends. The adorable little baby girl in pigtails. Amusing old codgers.

But he became a realist as he developed his painting skills. While he had a natural ability to capture emotion, his ability to become subtle in emotional portrayal only came with age, maturity, and a lot of OJT practice.

It served him very well, too. After the end of WWII, the mood of the nation was different. Cute and smarmy didn't work as well as it once had. Rockwell still used kids, but his boy gone fishin' became a thing of the past.

Rockwell's kids weren't so emotionally simple any more. Think of the painting of the triumphant little girl with a black eye, grinning happily on a bench outside the principal's office, where her shocked mother is glimpsed through a crack in the office door, aghast that her little sweetie got in a fight.
We all knew who the winner was in that kid fight,

That's a more complicated concept and a harder one to sell. And a harder one to pull off, too.

As his times changed, Rockwell changed with them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2018, 04:21 AM
 
13,758 posts, read 4,072,270 times
Reputation: 5019
I had forgotten about this thread. Good post bandjomike and I agree with much of your assessment but I knew some of the people in Stockbridge that Mr Rockwell painted and they were real people .Another poster said those times that Rockwell painted "never" existed and all I can say is I know for sure that some place's in America...they did.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Fine Arts
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top