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View Poll Results: Norman Rockwell Painter or Illustrator ?
Painter 2 50.00%
Illustrator 2 50.00%
Voters: 4. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-20-2018, 04:58 PM
 
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Why need it be one or the other? I suppose he's a painter, but I'm sure that all illustrators prefer to be called "painter" or "artist."
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Old 05-26-2018, 07:28 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Cida View Post
Why need it be one or the other? I suppose he's a painter, but I'm sure that all illustrators prefer to be called "painter" or "artist."
Thing is he would never call himself a painter. I think he was just great.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h57PDXDlTPc
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Old 05-26-2018, 07:38 PM
 
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Both and the consummate draftsman. A unique American whose art and opinions will easily outlive us all.

And a fantastic recorder/interpreter of the second half of the 20th century.

May the pictures of Norman Rockwell wave forever...
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Old 05-27-2018, 12:48 PM
 
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He was both. Not to my particular personal taste, but he was indeed both.
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Old 05-29-2018, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
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Originally Posted by 17thAndK View Post
He was anything but a realist. Due in part to the demands of his patrons, his body of work is principally a celebration of dreamy smarm and kitsch from a Pollyanna world of totem ideals that never really existed.
Much of his work could be described as such, but maybe not all art has to be angsty soul-baring with hyperrealistic guts spilling out.

He was also a Westchester swinger, if that helps.
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Old 05-29-2018, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
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Originally Posted by G1.. View Post
I disagree..........
The three civil rights workers?
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Old 05-31-2018, 12:46 AM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cida View Post
Why need it be one or the other? I suppose he's a painter, but I'm sure that all illustrators prefer to be called "painter" or "artist."
They are all artists. The only difference between art and illustration is the commission. An illustrator works for a commercial purpose, and the fine artist doesn't.

But for the painter, that's often no difference at all to them, as a painting is a job of work. If someone is willing to pay for their work, a painter will become an illustrator in the wink of an eye.

Rockwell liked the title. It allowed him a steady income. But Toulouse-Lautrec did too, even though he liked to be thought of as a fine artist as well. Mucha, Remington, and many other fine artists did illustrations, signage, logo design, and all kinds of commercial work over their lifetimes.

Andy Warhol was an illustrator for decades. Eric Von Schmidt painted pictures as illustrations, painted western landscapes and art, and painted many Presidential portraits. He didn't care what he was called.

For a professional, a job is a job. Painters are no different that plumbers in this. The customer usually dictates what the painting's subject is to be, or will put some other limit on the piece.

An amateur paints for the love of it. The professional paints because it feeds the bulldog. When Rockwell had reached the point in his life he no longer had to worry about the bulldog, he was free to paint whatever subject matter he wanted to paint.

His late civil-rights paintings are fully consistent with his earlier subject matter. Rockwell always portrayed the common American, but his works aren't always sappy or comedic at all. His World War II work showed a lot of the distress and worry that was felt on the home front, along with the national pride and confidence that arose during the war years.

He also showed the common man's confusion, nastiness, and nobility. It was only in his last years that Rockwell allowed himself to show the outrage he felt. But outrage is another part of the artist's territory.

Goya showed his outrage late in his life too, after a life of painting much more pleasant pictures.
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