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View Poll Results: Norman Rockwell Painter or Illustrator ?
Painter 2 50.00%
Illustrator 2 50.00%
Voters: 4. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-22-2017, 05:49 AM
 
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Norman Rockwell Painter or Illustrator?
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Old 08-24-2017, 08:22 AM
 
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I said illustrator, but of course he was a painter, maybe a little of both? Just so appreciated his works of family and memories of those times he so kindly shared with so many.
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Old 08-24-2017, 09:21 AM
 
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Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
I said illustrator, but of course he was a painter, maybe a little of both? Just so appreciated his works of family and memories of those times he so kindly shared with so many.

I remember even he called himself an Illustrator but to walk thru the Museum and look at all those magnificent paintings I can't think of him as anything else but a painter.
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Old 08-24-2017, 09:43 AM
 
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Originally Posted by G1.. View Post
I remember even he called himself an Illustrator but to walk thru the Museum and look at all those magnificent paintings I can't think of him as anything else but a painter.
can honestly relate and understand why you feel the way you do.

I bet to actually see his works, well, it must have been a very humbling time....
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Old 08-24-2017, 10:22 AM
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Location: Hudson Valley, NY
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I went with painter. If you recall Rockwell's self portrait painting sitting in front of his easel with his paint pallette, looks like a painter to me.

I agree about seeing Rockwell's work in person is very inspiring. If you've only seen his work on magazine covers or in books you may not realize how much larger they actually are and at the museum standing in front of his work you can feel drawn in. Plus his work is beautifully detailed. We actually live maybe half an hour away from Stockbridge and try to visit the museum every year.
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Old 08-24-2017, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
I said illustrator, but of course he was a painter, maybe a little of both? Just so appreciated his works of family and memories of those times he so kindly shared with so many.
He was both almost equally.
While he was more famous for his illustrations, Rockwell could have easily made a good living as a fine artist.

He was an especially good portrait painter; he was chosen to paint several official Presidential portraits, and was commissioned to do scores of portraits that have never been publicly seen. He also did many murals locally, and was commissioned to do murals in homes, buildings of all kinds, both public and private.

Rockwell's career as an illustrator diminished considerably with the end of the Saturday Evening Post in the early 1960s, but the work never stopped totally. Throughout the 60s and 70s, he did paintings for other magazines, record album covers, and other stuff, but by then, he had already reached some notable success as a fine art realist.

As he aged, painting fine art became his main interest. He was a strong civil rights advocate, and many of his strongest works were done with a related theme. His abilities increased without the time constraints he worked under for so long; he could take his time in late life, and did. His late work shows more attention and care.

But Alzhiemer's hit him in his 70s, and in his last years, he was unable to paint for quite a while before he passed away.
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Old 08-24-2017, 07:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cremebrulee View Post
can honestly relate and understand why you feel the way you do.

I bet to actually see his works, well, it must have been a very humbling time....
I live in MD but grew up in NJ and went to summer camp at a boys school in Lenox for over ten years,not for a week or two but for eight weeks and loved it!My parents would stay at one place every summer when they came to visit and that was the Red Lion Inn in Stockbridge.My Dad actually met Mr.Rockwell on the front porch of the INN in the early 70's.His studio was above one of the stores in town and it has the big picture window in it but then he built a privet studio in his back yard in a little house across the street from the Inn.That is the studio now at the Rockwell Museum ,the tour there is great you learn all the little things he did to make his paintings work.For example he painted the Town of Stockbridge at Christmas (hence the name) but then years later took the same painting and added cars to it to use in McCall's or Redbook one of those.The scene is recreated the first weekend of every December by the town it's self.






P.S.
As I understand it Mr Rockwells last work was for the Boy Scouts of America,at the age of 82.



https://stockbridgechamber.org/visit...-at-christmas/
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Old 08-25-2017, 06:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G1.. View Post
I live in MD but grew up in NJ and went to summer camp at a boys school in Lenox for over ten years,not for a week or two but for eight weeks and loved it!My parents would stay at one place every summer when they came to visit and that was the Red Lion Inn in Stockbridge.My Dad actually met Mr.Rockwell on the front porch of the INN in the early 70's.His studio was above one of the stores in town and it has the big picture window in it but then he built a privet studio in his back yard in a little house across the street from the Inn.That is the studio now at the Rockwell Museum ,the tour there is great you learn all the little things he did to make his paintings work.For example he painted the Town of Stockbridge at Christmas (hence the name) but then years later took the same painting and added cars to it to use in McCall's or Redbook one of those.The scene is recreated the first weekend of every December by the town it's self.






P.S.
As I understand it Mr Rockwells last work was for the Boy Scouts of America,at the age of 82.



https://stockbridgechamber.org/visit...-at-christmas/
Thanks so very much, greatly appreciate the information.

I don't know why, but this picture has always resonated within me. It is familiar, yet, I've never been there, and it pulls at my soul for some reason, almost like a sad feeling, of a past life or something....crazy?
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Old 08-25-2017, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
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I think one reason why Norman Rockwell was so popular, and remains so, long after his death, is because he was a 'humanist' (for lack of a better term.
From the beginning, Rockwell had the ability to portray human emotions keenly, in all the emotions we have. His early work has more obvious emotional content; a lot of his early illustrations were kids in innocent trouble and their reactions to the trouble, but as he matured, the emotions he portrayed became very subtle.

His full-color Post covers always had emotions at their core; his painting 'The Gossip', which was about a dozen portraits showing how a gossip story started on the telephone went full circle to the person who started it, was a classic in this; the emotions went from glee, to outrage, to disbelief, to shock, wonderment, doubt, the entire gamut.

Sometimes his careful use of the people's bodies carried deep emotional content. The huge cop sitting at a counter next to a small young boy who has run away from home, is a great example. Both have their back to the viewer, and their faces can't really be seen, but the body language he painted tells the story. The big cop is gentle. He's carefully counseling the little boy, who's still just a bit rigid with a little left-over anger, and is now just beginning to think running away might not be such a good idea.
It's all there. Easy for anyone to see. Rockwell tells one story after another, and always left enough emotional room to let us fill in the details as they fit each of us the best.

In this, I've always thought he was just as powerful as Munch's famous painting 'The Scream'. But between them, Rockwell was the virtuoso. He could make us laugh, feel sorrow, relief, joy, pain, anguish, outrage... any emotion he wanted to capture was at his command.

His late works, when he was more free from commercial restraints, were where Rockwell began to show his own emotions. His outrage was palpable in his painting of the little black girl surrounded by burly Federal marshals, going to her first day of a school that had just been integrated.

His pride in our accomplishments shone in his painting of an astronaut on the moon, even though the man is wearing a space suit and his face is unseen. The pose alone carries the emotional freight in the most subtle manner.

He will never go out of fashion. Anyone who has emotions will always instantly connect with his work at any age of their life.
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Old 08-25-2017, 11:11 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
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He was both. I've been to his museum and also to a traveling exhibit of his paintings. They are breathtaking.
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