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Old Yesterday, 05:51 PM
 
1,709 posts, read 562,554 times
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I'm curious about the path one would take to break into the Art market, including:

How to show a collection of works
How to market and sell
How to develop products based on your designs

I realize these are broad questions, but where do the usual pathways lie? Art school, for a start?
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Old Today, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
19,450 posts, read 13,103,103 times
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There's no single way to break into art as a profession.

Art is one of those things that lends itself to almost everything we see in the world around us continually. It's a skill that can apply to so many different things that it's all up to you as an individual to choose the direction you want to take for your life.

For me, making a living in art was a very early decision; I learned very young that it was one of very few things in life I was naturally good at, so I did my best to learn as much as I possibly could, and practiced heavily for many years putting my knowledge to use.

Once an artist just looks around and sees how much art is in our daily lives, it wasn't hard for me to find some practical ways to make a living as an artist. I never had to learn how to market my skills, as those skills are so uncommon they're all easy to find work in doing them.
At times, I've been a carousel artist, a sign painter, a muralist, a painter of very expensive guitars, an illustrator, cartoonist, a graphic designer, an artist for a label press, several printing presses, a couple of ad agencies, some web design companies, and an RV company that built custom coaches. At the time, each was my profession.

Sometimes I was working for others, sometimes I was my own boss. Sometimes it was both at the same time.

To me, it's all art. I always had to learn more than what I knew with everything that came along, so I always had to practice everything a lot. One thing always led to something different but always related to the other.

There was never a single pathway. There were always more pathways than I could take advantage of at one time. All I ever had to do was commit to one, and another one would appear. They were all difficult, I suppose, to an outsider, but I never thought of any of the work as easy or hard; it was only what I had to either learn or practice to make a living.

You may not want to ever be a professional artist if art is your joy. Satisfying the create urge that lives within all of us is often much more joyful as an amateur than as a profession.

For me, art is much more an itch that needs scratching than something that gives me great pleasure any more. While I still enjoy my work, it's still work, and work can always be a drag.

Good luck! If you are burning to become an artist, I wish I could have offered you the easy path. But there is none.

The decision to leap into the artist's life is the hardest part of that life, and the only thing that can help the leap is gaining some personal idea of what you want to do to put your creative urge to use first.

That decision is yours alone. It always is.
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Old Today, 02:57 PM
 
1,709 posts, read 562,554 times
Reputation: 3023
Quote:
Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
There's no single way to break into art as a profession.

Art is one of those things that lends itself to almost everything we see in the world around us continually. It's a skill that can apply to so many different things that it's all up to you as an individual to choose the direction you want to take for your life.

For me, making a living in art was a very early decision; I learned very young that it was one of very few things in life I was naturally good at, so I did my best to learn as much as I possibly could, and practiced heavily for many years putting my knowledge to use.

Once an artist just looks around and sees how much art is in our daily lives, it wasn't hard for me to find some practical ways to make a living as an artist. I never had to learn how to market my skills, as those skills are so uncommon they're all easy to find work in doing them.
At times, I've been a carousel artist, a sign painter, a muralist, a painter of very expensive guitars, an illustrator, cartoonist, a graphic designer, an artist for a label press, several printing presses, a couple of ad agencies, some web design companies, and an RV company that built custom coaches. At the time, each was my profession.

Sometimes I was working for others, sometimes I was my own boss. Sometimes it was both at the same time.

To me, it's all art. I always had to learn more than what I knew with everything that came along, so I always had to practice everything a lot. One thing always led to something different but always related to the other.

There was never a single pathway. There were always more pathways than I could take advantage of at one time. All I ever had to do was commit to one, and another one would appear. They were all difficult, I suppose, to an outsider, but I never thought of any of the work as easy or hard; it was only what I had to either learn or practice to make a living.

You may not want to ever be a professional artist if art is your joy. Satisfying the create urge that lives within all of us is often much more joyful as an amateur than as a profession.

For me, art is much more an itch that needs scratching than something that gives me great pleasure any more. While I still enjoy my work, it's still work, and work can always be a drag.

Good luck! If you are burning to become an artist, I wish I could have offered you the easy path. But there is none.

The decision to leap into the artist's life is the hardest part of that life, and the only thing that can help the leap is gaining some personal idea of what you want to do to put your creative urge to use first.

That decision is yours alone. It always is.
Thank you for your beautiful response!! --which, by the way, I understand very well. I did the same with music (the violin). One thing always led to another, from playing in coffeehouses to symphony halls, teaching in all sorts of venues, selling instruments.

Let me be more specific: I have hundreds of pen and ink drawings that I would like to use in some fashion, show, market. They are abstract drawnings, mostly, on musical models: children playing the piano, students of all ages, all kinds of interior landscapes inside houses, bedrooms, practice rooms. Sort of like Miro, Kandinsky, Klee. I made copies and copyrighted them. They work on purses and music bags which I designed but never sold many.

I'd like to show them, market them, get them into the public. If you have any ideas, please let me know.
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