U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Fine Arts
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-06-2008, 12:15 PM
 
Location: in my mind
2,745 posts, read 12,860,964 times
Reputation: 1591

Advertisements

My son is sixteen and his artistic talent has been apparent since he was very young. It's not just a "mom's opinion". I have been fortunate enough to have him in private school from 2nd grade through 5th and then we were able to get him scholarships for 2 summers to a local summer art program, and he has been attending a charter school since middle school (he's now a junior) with a great upper level art teacher. Every previous art teacher has raved about him and talked about how he's got the makings of a master, etc.

His current art teacher is great, and everyone's opinion is that he could really go far with his work and get a scholarship. So I have been talking with a close friend of mine who is also a high school art teacher and a fine artist in her own right, and she is strongly urging me to help him build a portfolio over the next year for "portfolio day", when various prestigious art school reps will take a look at the student's work and sometimes offer admission, even scholarships on the spot.

I have no real idea how to guide him in this though. We are a creative family overall but my creativity comes through in other ways. I am lost in the art world when it comes to painting, drawing, etc. I wondered if anyone here had any insight.

She says that they are looking for the ability to carry an idea all the way through from inspiration to finish, and the skills related to being able to work with various mediums. Most of his work is drawings (pencil) with a few paintings, but not many.

He is interested in computer graphic art and has some work he has done on the PC as well. He'd like to work in video game design but he's open to various career possibilities that allow him to use his artistic ability and creativity.

I just want to know what I, as his mom, can do to help him. I'm clueless about it all really. I do believe he has a really good shot and a scholarship would be so wonderful... because if he were accepted we'd really be at a loss as to how to pay for art school, but the alternative is a couple years at a community college with hopes of transferring later on.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-06-2008, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles Area
3,306 posts, read 3,327,921 times
Reputation: 592
Quote:
He is interested in computer graphic art and has some work he has done on the PC as well. He'd like to work in video game design but he's open to various career possibilities that allow him to use his artistic ability and creativity.
If he hasn't been working with these for a bit now, its unlikely he can get a strong portfolio together in the next year regardless of talent. In terms of "video game" design there are a lot of different sorts of skills that get pushed into the mix. Some are good at character design, some at level design etc. Someone that is good at fine art, may not be particularly good when it comes to character design, etc. Does he have the required software to work on graphic/3D design (its rather expensive)?

Regardless, you should build a portfolio around what he is best at and has been working on over the years. Once in school he can always change his focus to something he is more interested in (Although, many universities don't do much with 3D design). I would imagine the teachers you've been talking to would be the best source of information.

Also, if you can't afford art school its not big deal. With the exception of some
prestigious art schools the education he'd get at a community college and then transferring to a good 4-year isn't going to be much different. Well, at least here in California.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-06-2008, 06:38 PM
 
697 posts, read 1,776,675 times
Reputation: 361
Gee, my daughter is 14, and her work has been taken and assessed around the world. We started a portfolio for her when she was 3. She has worked primarily in ink, but has used pencil more the past couple years to experiment with shadows. She draws people all the time, and is extremely talented.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-06-2008, 06:43 PM
 
Location: in my mind
2,745 posts, read 12,860,964 times
Reputation: 1591
Quote:
Originally Posted by Humanoid View Post
If he hasn't been working with these for a bit now, its unlikely he can get a strong portfolio together in the next year regardless of talent. In terms of "video game" design there are a lot of different sorts of skills that get pushed into the mix. Some are good at character design, some at level design etc. Someone that is good at fine art, may not be particularly good when it comes to character design, etc. Does he have the required software to work on graphic/3D design (its rather expensive)?

Regardless, you should build a portfolio around what he is best at and has been working on over the years. Once in school he can always change his focus to something he is more interested in (Although, many universities don't do much with 3D design). I would imagine the teachers you've been talking to would be the best source of information.

Also, if you can't afford art school its not big deal. With the exception of some
prestigious art schools the education he'd get at a community college and then transferring to a good 4-year isn't going to be much different. Well, at least here in California.
Thanks for the reply.

As for computer stuff; all I know is that he's been learning Flash animation at school since last year, as well as Adobe Photoshop. He doesn't have any of the software at home but they have quite a bit available at school for his use.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-06-2008, 06:45 PM
 
Location: in my mind
2,745 posts, read 12,860,964 times
Reputation: 1591
Quote:
Originally Posted by 925mine View Post
Gee, my daughter is 14, and her work has been taken and assessed around the world. We started a portfolio for her when she was 3. She has worked primarily in ink, but has used pencil more the past couple years to experiment with shadows. She draws people all the time, and is extremely talented.
Gee, that's great for your daughter....and you were pro-active in starting a portfolio from age 3 (!) on, so that's all awesome for you and your daughter..... but I need help working with what we've got as of this point.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-06-2008, 06:58 PM
 
697 posts, read 1,776,675 times
Reputation: 361
Gee, all I'm saying is a little foresight would have helped. Haven't you kept work he has produced throughout the years????? Most mothers keep things like that. Put some of it together from different projects.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-06-2008, 07:20 PM
 
Location: in my mind
2,745 posts, read 12,860,964 times
Reputation: 1591
Quote:
Originally Posted by 925mine View Post
Gee, all I'm saying is a little foresight would have helped. Haven't you kept work he has produced throughout the years????? Most mothers keep things like that. Put some of it together from different projects.
GEE, as I explained before, I am clueless about art and art school, which is precisely why I was asking these questions. I recognized his talent, and it was not too terribly surprising as my mother and brother are talented artists in their own right. My mother has sold many paintings over the years (though not formally educated, just some community painting lessons) and my brother has worked in jobs directly utilizing his artistic talents (AutoCad, architectural design, etc) after some trade school training.

No one in my immediate family ever went to "art school", however... or even college for that matter, aside from my own few semesters at community college.

I assumed my son would either start out here at the community college or possibly go to the state university and get a "good enough" education, probably majoring in something else with a minor in Art.

It wasn't until recently, when I started discussing it with my art teacher friend, that she made us understand the possibilities for him as far as getting accepted into an art school with some prestige, vs. "just" going to UTSA and minoring in Art. I didn't know anything about portfolios and so forth until recently. Had no clue. Of course there is NOTHING wrong with going to the state university but if he has a chance at something bigger/better, well then why not try?

Of COURSE I have examples of his work from years back. It's not all his best work, it's not all a good indicator of all he can do. It's mostly what he LIKES to do, which is not the same as what he CAN do and I've been told it's better to show a range. It's my understanding that his absolute BEST should be presented and in the best possible way. Many are pieces that he never really intended to be great but they turned out that way... but they're done on the back of a notebook, or on lined notebook paper. Last year I bought him several sketch books and some really good art supplies so that he will stop with the lined paper stuff, but that doesn't help the fact that much of what he has done on his own time is on the page of a spiral.

Some of his paintings have been sold (by him)... neither of us thinking much of it at the time. He was flattered by adults offering to buy his work and so he sold it. He was always working on something and so we never thought to record or keep EVERYTHING.

Some of his projects from summer art programs are wonderful, but it's still clear that he was a pre-teen and I'm not sure if that is relevant to his attempts at getting into college, to showcase things he did at age 10, 11?

So, we can probably put together something right now with what we have, but he wants to put forth his BEST, and I understand that.

I don't doubt that with some focus and effort he can still produce some amazing pieces that will illustrate his talent in the best way possible. I just don't know the specifics of what he should plan to have ready (how many, what types of work, what mediums, etc) to give the best idea of what he can do across a spectrum of possibilities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-06-2008, 08:07 PM
 
697 posts, read 1,776,675 times
Reputation: 361
Ok, a portfolio is exactly that, not intended to be professional work. Some of my daughter's best work is on spiral notebooks with lines, but it's great work. When an art portfolio is analyzed, the person doing the analyzing looks at style and consistancy in talent, not what it's on.

My daughter has never had expensive supplies. For years all she drew on were spiral notebooks, until I finally got her to draw on real drawing paper in spiral pads. All she's ever used are black Bic pens, and now some pencil for her drawing. But there's no mistaking her talent. Her spacial IQ is near genius, so the piece of paper used is so very unimportant.

Remember, most of the most famous artists learned without going to the BEST art schools. Talent is talent. But then, she's not interested in impressing anybody. She may or may not wish to develope a career with her talent, but she has it for whatever she wants to do with it.

My daughter's drawings have been analyzed by educators across the globe, and you know what her drawings were on?? Yep, spiral notebook paper. And that did nothing to diminish the talent she displayed in the things she drew. In fact, when it was distributed to some places, it was faxed, AND IT STILL IMPRESSED THEM.

Last edited by 925mine; 09-06-2008 at 08:20 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-07-2008, 06:03 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles Area
3,306 posts, read 3,327,921 times
Reputation: 592
Quote:
Ok, a portfolio is exactly that, not intended to be professional work.
A portfolio is suppose to highlight your very best work and give others an idea about your style etc. Portfolios should contain professional work, not a bunch of cut and paste drawings from a spiral notebook.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-07-2008, 06:20 AM
 
Location: Midwest transplant
1,984 posts, read 4,791,834 times
Reputation: 1508
Go to a couple of high school art shows and see what the students put in their portfolios. They usually have a Sr. Art show and a total student art show at the end of a semester or the year. You should be prepared to have some of his best pieces matted at the least, or on a sturdy medium. Everything should be able to be packed into a large red portfolio case for carrying into the interviews. Anything that is too large needs to be carefully photographed and included. Projects from all levels, all grades and all mediums (sketch, CAD, pen, ink, pencil, paintings) should be included. He should also have a type of "mission statement" about how Art has driven him, where he gets his inspiration, how passionate he is about what it is he does, and what his goals for using his talents in Art in a professional career might be.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Fine Arts
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top