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Old 08-02-2011, 06:07 AM
 
3,552 posts, read 6,178,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ipoetry View Post
Good question. When we lived in Vero Beach and we had occasion to travel north, we'd want to cry when we walked into a Stop & Shop, Shaws, and yes, even Market Basket, and saw a real produce department. Publix is lacking so many ways but it has a lock on Florida. Shortly before we left Florida, a Fresh Market opened, and somehow it also managed to be lacking, a mini version of what you'd find elsewhere in the country.
Publix actually does not have the same things in every store. If the market warrants it they have cuts of meat, produce, groceries that Southern families probably wouldn't even know how to cook. Not cutting Southern families down because they also have things that Northerners would ruin trying to cook withut a lot of advice, too. The thing is if the market is there, it will be out in the store. If it is only a few people wanting it, you can ask and they sometimes can special order for you. You can only stock something that will sell and sell at a profit to make a store worth having in the area.

Having lived in the south most of my life, I am not exactly sure what is considered upscale foods? Are we talking expensive or are we actually talking regional products that you are used to from the areas you move down from.
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Old 08-02-2011, 06:21 AM
 
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Originally Posted by hiknapster View Post
Have you checked to see if there is a local co-op? And what about local sources? Farmer's markets? Farmers? This can sometimes be a good resource. Hook up with the right people and you will probably be better off than if you had stuck with a chain.
Exactly! Good info. Below are some links that should help out..

Organic Products & Organic Delivery - Off the Vine.org
natural food pensacola, organic food pensacola - Ever'man
Buy Local Produce :: Panhandle Fresh Marketing Association :: Northwest Florida
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Old 08-02-2011, 10:07 AM
 
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Originally Posted by sunlight50 View Post
Or, maybe more appropriately, where are they?

We recently moved to northwest Florida and while I am loving the fresh seafood, the rest of the grocery scene is a little lacking for me. I've spent the past 10 years or so in Dallas/Fort Worth, so I'm used to more upscale grocery stores - Central Market, Whole Foods etc. I love fresh and local produce and such (mmmm....local cheese) and I'm just not finding it at Publix. Anywhere else to look?
That's because you live in Northwest Florida. Lol. You should have came down south where all the real upscale groceries are.
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Old 08-02-2011, 11:00 AM
 
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Echoing the comments of others, you're contasting the selection in a huge Texas metropolis to that in a Florida small city. The difference isn't TX vs. FL; it's big city vs. small city.

In South Florida the Publixes do have large and extensive produce sections, and there is a big emphasis on local produce. Publix dominates the market here as well as throughout Florida, but Whole Foods is well represented down here, and we also have some more upscale markets, such as Gardner's. Really though the quality of Publix is often better than Gardner's or Whole Foods. Whole Foods does do breads well.
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Old 08-02-2011, 11:47 AM
 
15,123 posts, read 31,016,405 times
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Originally Posted by 122014471311 View Post
Echoing the comments of others, you're contasting the selection in a huge Texas metropolis to that in a Florida small city. The difference isn't TX vs. FL; it's big city vs. small city.

In South Florida the Publixes do have large and extensive produce sections, and there is a big emphasis on local produce. Publix dominates the market here as well as throughout Florida, but Whole Foods is well represented down here, and we also have some more upscale markets, such as Gardner's. Really though the quality of Publix is often better than Gardner's or Whole Foods. Whole Foods does do breads well.
This^^. But not only that, it's about demographics and supply and demand for items. I live in the small city of Sarasota, but because of the wealth and demographics here, we have ENORMOUS beautiful Publix stores with almost everything you could want including lots of organics, Super Target, Whole Foods, Fresh Market not to mention the specialty bakeries and independent gourmet stores and local organic farmer markets. I am incredibly spoiled. But before here we lived in the slightly larger city of Lakeland in central Fla. Publix there were decent but nothing like we have here, and no Whole Foods or any gourmet or specialty stores, or even Super Target. So it really does depend where in Florida you are. But I expect it's like that in ANY state, not just Florida.
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Old 08-02-2011, 03:40 PM
 
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They have those Greenwise Publix in some areas though I don't think there much different then the regular Publix. In S FL there are many Whole Foods some which are very large. The every day grocery stores though seem to lack. I feel both a Wegmans and Trader Joes would do wonderful in FL.
I consider Wegmans an upscale grocery. I consider Whole Foods an expensive grocery. I went to WF the other day and for 3 items it was 20 dollars. I can't imagine feeding a family of 4 from there.
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Old 08-02-2011, 04:08 PM
 
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All I know is that our first introductory to Florida cuisine came on the drive down. We stopped in JAX and a waitress who was originally from NY bemoaned that she couldn't find crusty bread anywhere because of the humidity. Sure enough, we spent 6 years with bread that was labeled 'artisan' or 'hand crafted' and it was anything but. It was always soggy and wrapped in plastic. Yeah, I know I could put it in my oven and crust it up it's an extra step in the nightly cooking process. I'll tell you what I miss however... Florida shrimp. We used to get them roadside and they were phenomenal. Now that we're in the northeast, we have to hunt them down and they cost a fortune. We're having them tonight, as a matter of fact.
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Old 08-30-2011, 11:17 PM
 
Location: on the edge of Sanity
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Last year in Naples, Publix opened a store they're calling a "hybrid" which is a combination traditional supermarket and an organic market carrying their Greenwise selections and specialty items. I've been in Publix markets with cafes. Wal-Marts also carry different items depending on the location.

By the way, a lot of people I meet seem to think that expensive or "gourmet" means healthful.


Whole Food Cranberry Orange Scones

Ingredients: Rice flour, tapioca starch, butter, orange juice concentrate, cream, eggs, dried cranberries (cranberries, evaporated cane juice, sunflower oil), evaporated cane juice, potato starch, baking powder (sodium acid pyrophosphate, sodium bicarbonate, cornstarch, monocalcium phosphate), xanthan gum, natural orange flavor, salt.

Nutritional Information: Per serving (1 scone/85g): 330 calories (140 from fat), 15g total fat, 9g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 3g protein, 47g total carbohydrate (less than 1g dietary fiber, 8g sugar), 80mg cholesterol, 350mg sodium. Servings per container: 4
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Old 08-31-2011, 04:33 AM
 
34,239 posts, read 41,268,949 times
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Most Flea markets have a fresh local produce section..
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Old 08-31-2011, 04:54 AM
 
21,116 posts, read 30,203,750 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justNancy View Post
By the way, a lot of people I meet seem to think that expensive or "gourmet" means healthful.


Whole Food Cranberry Orange Scones

Ingredients: Rice flour, tapioca starch, butter, orange juice concentrate, cream, eggs, dried cranberries (cranberries, evaporated cane juice, sunflower oil), evaporated cane juice, potato starch, baking powder (sodium acid pyrophosphate, sodium bicarbonate, cornstarch, monocalcium phosphate), xanthan gum, natural orange flavor, salt.

Nutritional Information: Per serving (1 scone/85g): 330 calories (140 from fat), 15g total fat, 9g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 3g protein, 47g total carbohydrate (less than 1g dietary fiber, 8g sugar), 80mg cholesterol, 350mg sodium. Servings per container: 4
^^^ Actually it is healthful considering the ingredient label. Nothing on it is artificial/synthetic. One would also hope that just because it's less unhealthy that some people wouldn't have a larger portion or eat more them more regularly as a result, which would go against the grain of most Americans. Beyond that, have you read ingredient labels from commercial bakeries? I challenge you to attempt to pronounce some of the ingredients as well as argue the healthful benefits of the ingredients.

I really can't understand the glee involved by many at slamming Whole Foods. Comments like "it's expensive", "it's elitist", "it's not that healthy", "they don't have all local or all organic"...blahblahblah. Meanwhile Publix, WalMart, Target and the rest get off scott-free with little question as to where the product comes from, how it's produced and little regard for nutrition as long as it's cheap. Our food system and our priorities are seriously messed up.
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