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Old 09-09-2011, 07:42 AM
 
Location: FLORIDA
8,964 posts, read 6,278,951 times
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And as far as neighbors' and how friendly they are (or aren't)... I lived in a new part of Orlando with VERY little sense of community. But, we met several families that were great and friendly. Just as friendly if not friendlier than the neighbors we have now in NC. I dont see ppl here in NC being any more talkative or welcoming than what we had in FL, and in FL, the neighborhood was very new and had a lot of turnover (rentals, foreclosures, etc).
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Old 09-09-2011, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Beach
3,378 posts, read 7,902,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seain dublin View Post
I have to laugh at Leftee's comments in regards to taking his daughter around to sell Girl Scout cookies and the blinds getting shut and the doors going unanswered.

So true, I feel the same way and have talked to others regarding the lack of a sense of community.

My area is all transplants so I can't blame native Floridians.

They live next door to people for 5 years and with the exception of a quick wave everyone is a stranger.

I think it has to do with the transient nature of FL. For example the house across the street has had 4 sets of owners in a little more than 10 yrs.

I have heard comments from why bother to get to know people because they may not stay or if they're old don't get friendly as they could die soon, or even worse might need your help with a ride to the store or to the doctor.

Lived in Oregon for a few years and while people are a little stand offish at first once they get to know you they're friendlier.

Doesn't mean you have to be best buddies, but this is the only place where I have seen so many people "unto themselves".

The cars pull into the driveway, the garage door goes up, and the people disappear. The few people I actually see out walking in the evening have a cell phone glued to their ear.
That's too bad. Loving the neighborhood we moved into. Haven't been there for a month yet and already have become good friends with the neighbors directly across the street in the front of our house. I frequently talk to the neighbor to the side of us and just met another neighbor a few houses down and had a nice conversation with them and found out their daughter babysits. I've also met many other neighbor and have had good conversations with them.

When I see a new neighbor outside, walking their dog, going for a stroll or in front of their house and I say hello or wave at them and they respond I walk up to them and introduce myself and my family. Conversation begins to ensue. Now when I see these people we frequently have a conversation about the area, what's going on in the neighborhood, planned events, etc.

With that said, I am sure there are many people in the neighborhood that would say there is no sense of community. They would probably change their tune if they made an effort to say hi to their neighbors and get to know them. I seriously doubt anybody ignore a neighbor and walk away from someone who was being friendly and trying to introduce themselves. The problem is, most people seem to be introverts these days.

Yes, there are a lot of transients in this state. But like us, they would probably like to meet some people and develops relationships with them.... they just don't know how to go about it.
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Old 09-09-2011, 08:06 AM
 
Location: N Atlanta
4,586 posts, read 3,398,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FloridaKash View Post
That's too bad. Loving the neighborhood we moved into. Haven't been there for a month yet and already have become good friends with the neighbors directly across the street in the front of our house. I frequently talk to the neighbor to the side of us and just met another neighbor a few houses down and had a nice conversation with them and found out their daughter babysits. I've also met many other neighbor and have had good conversations with them.

When I see a new neighbor outside, walking their dog, going for a stroll or in front of their house and I say hello or wave at them and they respond I walk up to them and introduce myself and my family. Conversation begins to ensue. Now when I see these people we frequently have a conversation about the area, what's going on in the neighborhood, planned events, etc.

With that said, I am sure there are many people in the neighborhood that would say there is no sense of community. They would probably change their tune if they made an effort to say hi to their neighbors and get to know them. I seriously doubt anybody ignore a neighbor and walk away from someone who was being friendly and trying to introduce themselves. The problem is, most people seem to be introverts these days.

Yes, there are a lot of transients in this state. But like us, they would probably like to meet some people and develops relationships with them.... they just don't know how to go about it.
Where's your neighborhood ? We want in ...

You could be right about the introvert part ... it seems to be easier to go in the house and turn on the computer/TV and forget about socializing. It also depends on your age, I suppose. Some of the friendliest people I've met in Florida have in the 60-70 age bracket. They seem to have the time to talk and chat and haven't given up the art of conversation, as has much of society today.
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Old 09-09-2011, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Beach
3,378 posts, read 7,902,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leftee View Post
Where's your neighborhood ? We want in ...

You could be right about the introvert part ... it seems to be easier to go in the house and turn on the computer/TV and forget about socializing. It also depends on your age, I suppose. Some of the friendliest people I've met in Florida have in the 60-70 age bracket. They seem to have the time to talk and chat and haven't given up the art of conversation, as has much of society today.
It's Northdale, just north of Carrolwood.

We're early 30's and those that we have met are anywhere from 30 - 50.

The neighbors we are good friends across the street moved into their place back in April. They said they hadn't met or got to know anybody around. However, since we've been there they have met several families in the neighborhood now. Most of the others have been met while we were outside shooting the breeze for 30 - 45 minutes. Can't meet the neighbors unless you are outside and be social.

In the next few weeks I would like to setup a lemonade stand for the kids to give out free lemonade. I think this too would be a good way to meet more families.

Hoping by Xmas the house is in good enough shape where we can have a block party. With a pool table (ping pong top can also be used for beer pong), wet bar, huge enclosed pool patio and a floor plan made to entertain we're sure have an excellent time.

Also planning on going a little nutso with the Xmas lights outside this year.
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Old 09-09-2011, 10:56 AM
 
17,297 posts, read 25,723,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leftee View Post
Where's your neighborhood ? We want in ...

You could be right about the introvert part ... it seems to be easier to go in the house and turn on the computer/TV and forget about socializing. It also depends on your age, I suppose. Some of the friendliest people I've met in Florida have in the 60-70 age bracket. They seem to have the time to talk and chat and haven't given up the art of conversation, as has much of society today.
Seriously, if you want an "old neighborhood" type feel, you should seriously consider moving to an old neighborhood... especially one designated to be historic. Even in your own area, I am willing to bet you will find more pedestrians, people more involved in their communities, etc. in historic areas around downtown Orlando or Winter Park.

As mentioned above, I don't relate to claims that "neighbors aren't friendly" posts, because I live somewhere where I am probably the least friendly! My neighborhood hosts monthly socials and get togethers, holiday home tours, garden tours, neighborhood mass garage sales, etc. etc. Again, however, I live in a historic neighborhood (developed in the 20s - 40s), and I think those kinds of places attract people who WANT to be involved in the community, fix up old homes, improve their city, etc.

If I wanted to be a complete recluse I'd buy in a gated subdivision where a 3 car garage is the most prominent feature on the home, so I would never even have to use my front door (just drive in and out of my home!)
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Old 09-09-2011, 12:07 PM
 
1,490 posts, read 969,338 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FloridaKash View Post
With that said, I am sure there are many people in the neighborhood that would say there is no sense of community. They would probably change their tune if they made an effort to say hi to their neighbors and get to know them. I seriously doubt anybody ignore a neighbor and walk away from someone who was being friendly and trying to introduce themselves. The problem is, most people seem to be introverts these days.

Yes, there are a lot of transients in this state. But like us, they would probably like to meet some people and develops relationships with them.... they just don't know how to go about it.
This is exactly on the money Kash (no pun intended)...no matter where somebody moves to.

We have the same thing in our neighborhood that we moved to up north. Some neighbors don't socialize with anybody, or make much effort to know the other neighbors. But my wife (being much more social than I) goes out of her way to get people socializing and interacting as not everybody is particularly good at it, or knows how to step out of their comfort zone. Me, being the introverted one, ends up just tagging along with her but eventually everybody loosens up more over time, and with each conversation. We've even met more & more people from our kids' sports activities as well and have made some good friends from that path.

It didn't happen overnight, though. Its been 3+ years for us. And while we've met some people we'd likely not miss if they left the neighborhood, there are many we would. Such is life...but you really have to do 2 things.

(1) You really HAVE to make an effort. A REAL effort to meet people. If you don't want to make such effort, and will not have family/friends where you are moving to...don't move. That goes for ANY place, not just Florida. Any place you move to will not feel like a "community" to you if you don't have any ties to it yourself...typically this is family/friends.

(2) You have to give your move a good bit of time. Not 6 months. Sure, you could meet great friends in a week of moving, but new friends can sometimes come & go a little if you don't have other things keeping you in contact. So, give yourself time to establish roots. Whether those be your kids activities (like us), or whether those be work friends, or even social clubs/activities. The key is...unless you are the ultimate introvert...you will want friends at some point to enjoy life with.

I think people take for granted what they had before they moved and just miss all of the roots they had in place where they came from. You knew the butcher because you went to school with him. You knew the bus driver because she was friends with your mom. You knew your son's baseball coach because he worked with your brother. You move some place new...that ALL GOES AWAY. This is the type of stuff I grew up with in FL, and I am now busy rebuilding new roots where I am today. Life may take me back to Florida some day, but until they do, you have to work on making things the way you want them...and not just waiting for it to happen by magic.
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Old 09-10-2011, 07:25 AM
 
378 posts, read 724,514 times
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Some places just have a stronger sense of community that others. It's usually found in smaller communities more so than in large cities. It comes from the majority of people living there loving where they live and taking pride in it. That's just reflected in the article's choices. It's tough to get that in a large city where cutting people off on the road and throwing trash on the ground is commonplace. If most of the residents have no pride in where they live and don't care about anybody but themselves, how can there be a sense of community?

I think most people today seek that sense of community that may have been lost where they live due to population growth. Maybe that's why some of the FL towns that used to dominate the list have disappeared from it.
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Old 09-11-2011, 03:04 PM
 
Location: The Conterminous United States
22,554 posts, read 47,385,414 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ComSense View Post
And as far as neighbors' and how friendly they are (or aren't)... I lived in a new part of Orlando with VERY little sense of community. But, we met several families that were great and friendly. Just as friendly if not friendlier than the neighbors we have now in NC. I dont see ppl here in NC being any more talkative or welcoming than what we had in FL, and in FL, the neighborhood was very new and had a lot of turnover (rentals, foreclosures, etc).
I hate to say it, but that's exactly why we didn't move to the area you picked. And one of the reasons was because there are too many darn transplants. I know. I am a hypocrite. I hate transplants and I am one.

There are less transplants here, more of the Southern but hip vibe. And out of the transplants that do come here, the nice ones stay and the nasty ones leave. I think there is a sense of community here and it drives the superficial, unfriendly people away. Knoxville is the biggest town you'll ever see where no one is a stranger. When we bought our house there was a steady stream of neighbors to greet us, even a plate of cookies.

But it depends on the person and also the community. There are welcoming neighborhoods and less friendly ones in the same city.

When I lived in Orlando I had friendly neighbors no matter where I lived. In Fort Myers and Bonita Springs it was less so.

I think if most people in a city don't know their mayor's name it is usually a sign of a transient area. And a lot of the rampant housing development was a product of that. Local government was allowing development almost everywhere and they knew their constituents were looking the other way, too apathetic and self-centered to care.
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Old 09-11-2011, 03:21 PM
 
5,187 posts, read 5,695,272 times
Reputation: 1614
Philadelphia and Jacksonville,Florida(my hometown) top big cities to live in, I know this is a screwy survey.
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Old 09-11-2011, 03:42 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,849 posts, read 30,393,258 times
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I take serious exception with people who think that they know what is "best", based upon an arbitrary list of variables.

What is "best" for me might not be best for you. Clearly, since I love the ocean and, given the financial resources, would not dream of living anywhere that there was not an ocean; coupled with the fact that I detest mountains in general and Colorado in particular, I would definitely disagree with their #1 choice.

Also I would expect that a better title for this article would be... The Best Places to Live (if you are not a minority). If you know what I mean.

20yrsinBranson
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