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Old 09-05-2007, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Tampa
3,981 posts, read 9,413,307 times
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Since some of our aquifers are getting dangerously low, and Okeechobee is getting kinda high, can we drain some of the lake into the aquifers?
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Old 09-05-2007, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
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Okeechobee is getting high? I thought it was way below normal!
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Old 09-05-2007, 08:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
Okeechobee is getting high? I thought it was way below normal!
It is very low. I was at the lake on Sunday. What should be under water is dry land.
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Old 09-05-2007, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Tampa
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hmmm, just a few months ago they were worried about it overflowing...
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Old 09-05-2007, 09:36 AM
Status: "No plan is a plan for failure" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Florida/Tennessee
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Pumping surface water into any aquafier in Florida is risky. Essentially you remove the filter mechanism and risk contamination of drinking water. Deep well injection is a very thought out process, and not used to recharge drinking water with "untreated" surface water.
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Old 09-05-2007, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Tampa
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well, from what ive been reading, some of the aquifers, esp near miami, are getting so low there is fear that salt water will start seeping in, ruining the water.

wouldnt draining the lake be a better alternative? maybe send it thru some treatment plant first?
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Old 09-05-2007, 10:12 AM
Status: "No plan is a plan for failure" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Florida/Tennessee
2,232 posts, read 4,274,089 times
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There already is the Miami Canal. Your idea is understood... but it just isn't that simple. Try this..... drink a glass of water from a surface pond or lake, then............... Report back tomorrow!
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Old 09-05-2007, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Tampa
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im thinking no. but thats why it would have to be treated/filtered first.

and im sure the aquifer water is treated b4 its sent to homes?
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Old 09-05-2007, 12:39 PM
Status: "No plan is a plan for failure" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Florida/Tennessee
2,232 posts, read 4,274,089 times
Reputation: 1139
Municiapal supplied water is treated... but most wells (home owners) are not. Water from a well (shallow) generally is filtered for "sediment" like sand... and maybe softened, but not "treated".
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Old 09-05-2007, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 23,752,062 times
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The limestone under Florida is somewhat of a filter, but it's full of holes and caves that act as underground canals. Surface water evaporates, so every time a canal or lake is dug, more water is lost to evaporation. Gravity allows the water anywhere in Florida to flow down the state, or from high to low elevations. Unfortunately greed and stupidity, the driving forces of the Florida economy have reduced the amount of water that enters the ground. Before development water would fall in different parts of Florida, and slowly flow across the state. Yes it would flood at times, but Florida's flat topography assured no catastrophic results. Those areas became covered with a rich muck, or black dirt from carbon captured by plant life.


Since Florida's water supply is dependant on rain and the ground is like a sponge, canals are very, very bad. Think of a sponge sitting in a pool of salt water- you have to keep it soaked or the salt comes in. Drain the lake, ground water pressure drops and the salt water comes in.
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