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Old 09-06-2007, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Tampa
3,981 posts, read 9,413,307 times
Reputation: 1171

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Hypothetically, Global Warming is true.

Within 20 years the ice caps are going to melt and flood everything within 25 miles of the coast.

Where would you go?
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Old 09-06-2007, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 23,752,062 times
Reputation: 4900
I am on stilts, guess I would enjoy the property tax break and travel by boat....LOL!
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Old 09-06-2007, 10:26 PM
 
1,258 posts, read 3,266,624 times
Reputation: 733
The lovely hills of Lake County!
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Old 09-07-2007, 06:03 AM
 
Location: Lake Worth, Fl
364 posts, read 984,897 times
Reputation: 79
Wherever Al Gore is and say "Im sorry, I turned off your boring movie".
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Old 09-07-2007, 08:46 AM
 
Location: New Smyrna Beach, Florida
131 posts, read 977,482 times
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If the polar ice caps melt, there would not be a great increase in ocean levels.

According to the research in the link I've posted below, if all the world's sea ice melted, there would only be an increase of about 4mm.

Think about ice in a glass of water. When the ice melts, does the glass overflow?

Sea Level, Ice, and Greenhouses -- FAQ

The main concern is going to be how the loss of the polar ice caps changes the environment as a whole. Will there be more hurricanes? Harsher winters? Coral reefs off the New Jersey coast? Nobody really knows for certain.
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Old 09-07-2007, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Tampa
3,981 posts, read 9,413,307 times
Reputation: 1171
ummm, thats not necessarily true.

that only applies to the ice floating in the sea.

much of it, esp in Greenland and the Antartica is actually on land.

So, if that melts, its like turning on a faucet into a full glass of water.

HUGE difference.
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Old 09-07-2007, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Lake Worth, Fl
364 posts, read 984,897 times
Reputation: 79
So your saying people in TN will be able to go to the beach eventually without leaving the state. WOO HOO Ill bring the umbrella.

Sorry for the sarcasm but this new Y2K type scare warmed over is annoying me.
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Old 09-07-2007, 09:16 AM
 
Location: New Smyrna Beach, Florida
131 posts, read 977,482 times
Reputation: 173
According to the research I've read, the Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets will take hundreds of years to melt.

The polar ice cap is what is currently melting the fastest, and is where this hypothetical "20 year" number has come from.
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Old 09-07-2007, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
142 posts, read 953,689 times
Reputation: 105
Yeah, I say buy up some cheap property about 25 miles from the present coast, then sit back and wait. A couple years down the road, after Miami has already been reclaimed by the sea, you can sell your waterfront property and make a killing. Then you might want to write Al Gore and thank him for the "heads up".
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Old 09-07-2007, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Bike to Surf!
3,080 posts, read 9,920,784 times
Reputation: 2978
This is an interesting question to me, especially since I am considering buying property on the barrier islands. If they're going to be innundated, maybe I should think about living elsewhere.

Assuming that sea levels are likely to rise significantly: It really depends on the speed of the process, as to how it affects people. If the sea level rises 1 or 2 meters over 100 years, we will probably see the "New Orleans" or "Venice" syndrome all over the world near the coasts. With each passing year, these cities sink a little lower, so every 20 years or so bigger dykes or new flood control systems are implemented. Every once in a while a tsunami, hurricane, or other disaster floods them out, but they rebuild over a decade or two with bigger dykes.

Florida may some day look a lot like Holland, with an enormous system of barrier dykes built up along the coast. Occasionally a hurricane will flood a section of the state, but the risk would not be all that terrible. In this case, I would still feel like buying/building near the coast is a worthwhile risk.

However, if the warming of the globe and polar melt models are too conservative, or if some forseen--like seabed methane--or unforseen feedback loop appears and causes sea levels to rise a meter or two in just a few years--say a decade or two--low-lying coastal areas will have to be abandoned, as the sea rises faster than we can build walls against it. In this case, an investment in low-lying coastal realestate would be foolhardy.

Wish I had a crystal ball and could look into the future before I make my decision.
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