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Old 08-12-2013, 01:53 PM
 
6 posts, read 9,975 times
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Default so if i was to go swimming in florida

where is the best place to swim to avoid the brain eating amoeba

(by the way a new case just popped up in florida, a 10 year old boy sources are rumoured)

shallow or deep/open water?
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Old 08-12-2013, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Miami/ Washington DC
4,688 posts, read 5,082,256 times
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You won't find that in the Oceans. Those types of bacterias occur in small freshwater bodies of water. The smaller and more shawllow the water the more likely it will have harmful bacteria etc.. Closed small bodies of water get warmer faster and stay warm longer. Warm freshwater is also a sign. Also it can occur in pools which are not treated correctly with the correct amount of chlorine.

Any beach will be fine. Most beaches are tested weekly by cities, counties and the state for bacteria but things like brain eating amoeba don't live in the open waters, especially salt water.
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Old 08-12-2013, 02:06 PM
 
6 posts, read 9,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyMIA View Post
You won't find that in the Oceans. Those types of bacterias occur in small freshwater bodies of water. The smaller and more shawllow the water the more likely it will have harmful bacteria etc.. Closed small bodies of water get warmer faster and stay warm longer. Warm freshwater is also a sign.

Any beach will be fine. Most beaches are tested weekly by cities, counties and the state for bacteria but things like brain eating amoeba don't live in the open waters, especially salt water.
so swimming in deep and open water is much safer then shallow water
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Old 08-12-2013, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Miami/ Washington DC
4,688 posts, read 5,082,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedCarRider500 View Post
so swimming in deep and open water is much safer then shallow water
Doesn't need to be deep. Any open body of water like a bay, an ocean, a fast moving river, a canal connected to one of the above is safe from things like amoebas. The open part is the key. The bacteria forms because the water is not moving, does not get circulated and is very easily warmed up. Open bodies of water, even moving rivers won't warm up like that. The reason shallow is worse is because that just means there is less water to warm up and also there is no cooler water on the bottom and all the muck is easily kicked up.

So if its a lake yes deeper is better. If its an ocean it does not make a difference.

Of course both bodies of water have their own animal dangers.
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Old 08-12-2013, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Miami,FL
2,753 posts, read 1,122,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyMIA View Post
Doesn't need to be deep. Any open body of water like a bay, an ocean, a fast moving river, a canal connected to one of the above is safe from things like amoebas. The open part is the key. The bacteria forms because the water is not moving, does not get circulated and is very easily warmed up. Open bodies of water, even moving rivers won't warm up like that. The reason shallow is worse is because that just means there is less water to warm up and also there is no cooler water on the bottom and all the muck is easily kicked up.

So if its a lake yes deeper is better. If its an ocean it does not make a difference.

Of course both bodies of water have their own animal dangers.
Open bodies of water don't warm up?
is that just me or is the water off the coast of florida almost 90f? so much for open water not warming up.
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Old 08-12-2013, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Miami/ Washington DC
4,688 posts, read 5,082,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miamihurricane555 View Post
Open bodies of water don't warm up?
is that just me or is the water off the coast of florida almost 90f? so much for open water not warming up.
The water circulates, the water doesn't just sit there. That's the main thing. And its Salt Water. Open bodies of water don't warm up or cool down anywhere near the rate a lake does. Of course the ocean can get hot it just takes a lot longer.

Last edited by FlyMIA; 08-12-2013 at 08:40 PM..
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Old 08-12-2013, 08:30 PM
 
3,956 posts, read 3,170,612 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miamihurricane555 View Post
Open bodies of water don't warm up?
is that just me or is the water off the coast of florida almost 90f? so much for open water not warming up.
Maybe so but that is all salt water! ......no amoebas
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Old 08-12-2013, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Broward County FL
654 posts, read 472,298 times
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"Naegleria fowleri is commonly found in warm, freshwater lakes, rivers and canals. Infection with it is extremely rare: only 28 cases have been reported in the U.S. from 2003 to 2012, according to the health department.

Infection typically occurs when contaminated water enters the nose, and the amoeba travels to the brain tissue. It causes a devastating infection called primary amebic meningoencephalitis, or "PAM," and is usually fatal.

It is not found in salt water, and you cannot get it from drinking contaminated water"
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Old 08-12-2013, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Naples
2,224 posts, read 2,330,919 times
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Well salt water isn't safe either we just had two alligators along our beach swimming with the folk a few weeks back .. Found their way in from the brackish... Never swim in lakes in fla... The amoebas are the least of ur worries when you're in a death roll.
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Old 08-12-2013, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Miami,FL
2,753 posts, read 1,122,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post
Maybe so but that is all salt water! ......no amoebas
but there is red tide sometimes.
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