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Old 12-19-2013, 09:35 AM
 
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Does anyone have any examples of cities or states where the infrastructure, education, job market etc, could not handle an influx of incoming population and could this ever happen in Florida?
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Old 12-19-2013, 11:30 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Red3311 View Post
Does anyone have any examples of cities or states where the infrastructure, education, job market etc, could not handle an influx of incoming population and could this ever happen in Florida?
Nope. Half of the Baby Boomer generation has reached retirement and beyond that we're at very small fractional growth increases moving forward for the foreseeable future. Florida's economic conditions have already proven unable to support past population levels so it doesn't seem likely we'll see massive (or sustainable) growth numbers like we once had.
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Old 12-19-2013, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Florida's Native Child
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Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Nope. Half of the Baby Boomer generation has reached retirement and beyond that we're at very small fractional growth increases moving forward for the foreseeable future. Florida's economic conditions have already proven unable to support past population levels so it doesn't seem likely we'll see massive (or sustainable) growth numbers like we once had.
I disagree, I don't believe that anyone looking to move to "paradise" will care about things like economy, infrastructure, ect, ect. I mean, they never did before?
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Old 12-19-2013, 01:26 PM
 
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Originally Posted by OneNativeFloridian View Post
I disagree, I don't believe that anyone looking to move to "paradise" will care about things like economy, infrastructure, ect, ect. I mean, they never did before?
Did you read the same paragraph? I didn't say whether they "cared" or not, I said it won't happen because we won't have the numbers.
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Old 12-19-2013, 01:43 PM
 
Location: The Conterminous United States
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This already happened during the boom and subsequent bust. Like a real-life game of musical chairs, the prices kept going up, more and more homes were built, people kept moving in and then, eventually, the values didn't keep up with prices. Lack of jobs - other than construction - and the stretching of existing police, fire, schools and roads happened. It wasn't pretty.
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Old 12-19-2013, 02:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Nope. Half of the Baby Boomer generation has reached retirement and beyond that we're at very small fractional growth increases moving forward for the foreseeable future. Florida's economic conditions have already proven unable to support past population levels so it doesn't seem likely we'll see massive (or sustainable) growth numbers like we once had.
That hasn't stopped past, present (and probable) future population growth in this state.
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Old 12-19-2013, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Norwood, Massachusetts
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The only recent example that comes to mind of a place where the infrastrcture is dramatically strained by the influx is the current boom in natural gas in the northern plains. I understand that rents in places like North Dakota and other boom areas a re skyrocketing because there are loads of jobs suddenly and people coming in to fill them but not enough housing and general services to support them. However that is a very different situation than here. A lot of people move down here for reirement which is a little more measured.
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Old 12-20-2013, 05:12 AM
 
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Originally Posted by chopchop0 View Post
That hasn't stopped past, present (and probable) future population growth in this state.
True, but one has to look at migration rates and rate of death. Florida has closed the gap considerably in terms of out-migration versus in-migration rates and our net population gain statewide is around 50K. 175K residents died in 2012, 212K were born in Florida in 2012. The number being born here and the number migrating out are pretty close to equal leaving a nominal gain for now. As the birth rate continues to decrease and the overall population ages the numbers will equal out further. Outside of another housing boom which isn't likely given Florida's lack of economic diversity, drastic population increases aren't going to happen.
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Old 12-20-2013, 05:21 AM
 
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Originally Posted by chopchop0 View Post
That hasn't stopped past, present (and probable) future population growth in this state.
Florida had NEGATIVE growth in 2008 and stagnant 2009-2011...
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Old 12-20-2013, 06:48 AM
 
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Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
True, but one has to look at migration rates and rate of death. Florida has closed the gap considerably in terms of out-migration versus in-migration rates and our net population gain statewide is around 50K. 175K residents died in 2012, 212K were born in Florida in 2012. The number being born here and the number migrating out are pretty close to equal leaving a nominal gain for now. As the birth rate continues to decrease and the overall population ages the numbers will equal out further. Outside of another housing boom which isn't likely given Florida's lack of economic diversity, drastic population increases aren't going to happen.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red3311 View Post
Florida had NEGATIVE growth in 2008 and stagnant 2009-2011...
Yet somehow, we are predicted to outgrow NY and become the third most populated state in the country. Our growth may not be gangbusters, but it seems to be doing better than many others (fortunately, or unfortunately depending on your perspective).

Florida Expected To Soon Be Third-Most-Populous State | WFSU
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