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Old 03-12-2015, 12:50 AM
 
Location: Washington state
5,431 posts, read 2,758,123 times
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OK, just to confuse things further, here are pictures of two houses. This one I would consider to be a McMansion:




This other house I would not consider to be a McMansion:



The houses probably have roughly the same sq footage. They even have the same features. But the second one has a timeless facade and a lot of character and the first one just looks like it was slapped together overnight and the word gaudy and faux Victorian come to mind when I look at it. Again, this is just my opinion and anyone is free to disagree with it.
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Old 03-12-2015, 10:26 AM
 
1,620 posts, read 1,061,063 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ILoveTravel26 View Post
I like this house.People have different descriptions of what a Mcmansion is, so I'm curious.It's over 3000 sq ft so it's not a small house.Apparently, some people consider houses that aren't small "mcmansions" .I've also seen a lot of people assuming that if a house has been built large and is not a mansion, then its built of poor quality materials but I don't see how you can know the quality of the materials used just from glancing at a house
McMansions are usually either:
  • > 4,000sqft and use lower quality materials that only appear to look ultra-lux.
  • Nearly twice the size (or more) of virtually all of the other homes in the neighborhood.
The biggest common denominator with the McMansion crowd seems to be the attitude of the owner(s). As it pertains to the above examples, these folks are either pretenders or simply want to look like royalty among perceived peasants. Neither trait tends to make for a good neighbor.
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Old 03-12-2015, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Englewood, FL
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And I think that a McMansion really does tend to be too big for it's lot and for the neighborhood. Sort of sticks out gaudily. I don't think any of the pics that the OP posted are McMansions.
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Old 03-12-2015, 03:49 PM
 
2,111 posts, read 2,087,563 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
The houses probably have roughly the same sq footage. They even have the same features. But the second one has a timeless facade and a lot of character and the first one just looks like it was slapped together overnight and the word gaudy and faux Victorian come to mind when I look at it. Again, this is just my opinion and anyone is free to disagree with it.
You're right. The first one is mixing too many elements. The chimneys are the wrong shape. There is a stone front on the first one that doesn't belong, the cone on the turret looks off, and there are too many gables.

Most of the tacky McMansions mix too many elements and even some that don't belong. There is a book, Get Your House Right and that was the point the author made regarding trying to get every element incorporated into the house. Same with the previous picture with that awful arched window in the center of the second floor.

The second has the classic look of an old Victorian.
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Old 03-12-2015, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Sunny South Florida
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House #1 is new construction trying to reflect older architectural elements from diverse periods, while #2 is authentically old (that is, built during the period it reflects) so it is a more uniform instance of one style.

You will often see old manor houses and even castles in Europe that have a hodgepodge of styles, due to adding on and occasional rebuilding that occurred over centuries. Houses like #1 are likely trying to evoke that style, but really---it's not fooling anyone if it's built in a brand-new neighborhood.

Since it's a pop-culture term, I guess we can limit a "McMansion" to having been built after about 1985, when we also became familiar with Yuppies, who were some of the first demographic groups who might desire such a McMansion. House #2 looks to be a farmhouse built sometime between the late 1880s and 1910s.

This isn't a topic exclusive to Florida. It actually really ought to be in the architecture forum, since there would be people with more knowledge of this whole concept.
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Old 03-12-2015, 08:05 PM
 
Location: New York City
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I think this would be an example of a McMansion.
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Old 03-15-2015, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Treasure Island Fl
662 posts, read 941,285 times
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The way I always understood Mac Mansions, were enormous homes built in neighborhoods that were historicly more modest homes. You hear this term used a lot in South Tampa. The area, was largely more modest, older homes, built on smaller lots. As south Tampa became more desirable, people started tearing down the smaller homes and building 4000sq/ft homes, taking up almost the entire lot.
It tends to look out of place when compared to the historic fabric of the nieghborhood.
I don't think it nessasarily applies to suburban homes, where All the houses are 4000 sq/ft and on half acre lots.
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Old 03-15-2015, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Lincoln County Road or Armageddon
4,229 posts, read 5,692,103 times
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Wikipedia;

McMansion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"The term "McMansion" is generally used to denote a new, or recent, multi-story house with no clear architectural style, which prizes superficial appearance over quality. It may seem too large for it's lot and rarely has windows on the side due to closely abutting upon the property boundaries."

A pretty good description of the generic homes being built in the former cow pastures of Hillsborough.
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Old 03-15-2015, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Atlanta/Tallahassee/Chicago/Lakeland
478 posts, read 895,608 times
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Below is an example of what was being constructed in East Lakeland (Spanish Oaks) and S.W. Lakeland during the boom. They were typically of a box design and they didn't look as good as the picture.

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Old 03-15-2015, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Treasure Island Fl
662 posts, read 941,285 times
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There is a house style that may be worse than a McMansion.
I have a buddy that lives in a subdivision in east Pasco. The front of his house is a 2 car garage. The entrance to the house is way down the side of the house. The Only thing you can see from the street is the garage. No part of the house itself is visible from the front. It's really nasty looking.
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