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Old 04-04-2015, 01:37 AM
 
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Hi everyone I just wanted to start a discussion about some things you are noticing in your neighborhoods regarding types of people as I would love to see what changes are taking places all around. I know my question is kind of random but please feel free to share your thoughts and opinions. Please no rude, racist or disrespectful comments as I'm trying to make this thread as civil as possible.

Some Questions as a guide:

Are More Retirees moving in ?

More Young Families ?

Singles ?

Young Professionals ?

Hipsters ?

Immigrants ?

Is your neighborhood getting richer or poorer ?

What would you like to see done to help improve your area ?


P.S Post the City or Suburb name that you are discussing.
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Old 04-04-2015, 05:52 AM
 
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West Sanford is seeing a lot of younger singles/couples and families move in for the favorable location as well as the schools. Lake Mary is pretty much built out so the only room left to take advantage of all of the amenities is here in on the west side of Sanford. The area is becoming wealthier with a 20% increase forecasted by 2018. In terms of improvements I would hope to see some kind of constraint over development so it doesn't become another Altamonte Springs.
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Old 04-04-2015, 07:12 AM
 
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The Keys are seeing a sort of unfortunate trend in changes. Because most of the land is below-flood, and flood insurance is rapidly rising, the cost of living in the Keys in legal above-flood housing is also rapidly rising. We also do not have enough affordable housing for locals as it is, nor good steady jobs with benefits. So the result is a shift toward even more part-time extremely wealthy residents, who can afford to buy the new construction that is up to current building code, or who can afford to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash for the older houses left that are below flood and do not qualify for a mortgage as such. (This also means that many neighborhoods are virtually empty for part of the year, or have wild vacation renters racing through the streets.)

The type of people who have this kind of money tend to be white, older, and male or couples. A decent percentage of these are Spanish-speaking, predominantly white Cuban from the Miami area, but nonetheless are still white and fall more in the 1% economically.

On the other hand, more and more people continue to flood into the Keys, heading toward Key West, on foot with backpacks. These people are often totally homeless, have no working vehicle, and come down with no real skills to speak of looking for cheap illegal housing with a large number of roommates, and various part-time jobs in the tourist industry such as server, bartender (not actually easy for them to get), hotel staff, etc. Their plan is to lay on the beach all day and to drink/party a lot, and in the evenings to pay for their portion of the rent by cobbling together the earnings from a handful of different low-wage low-skill jobs. A lot of these people are in their 20s and 30s, dealing with disillusionment and running from emotional or legal troubles on the mainland, and generally involved in drugs and/or alcoholism. These seem to be a majority white, and still a majority male or couples. Since you mention it, some of these might fall in the "Hipster" category. Nearly all of them bring multiple pets down here with them.

The numbers of people who fall in between this in terms of age, skill level, and income are consistently dwindling. This is not a county that is terribly affordable for families, although the schools here have an A rating. There is some diversity in terms of skin color and background, but that doesn't seem to be increasing much - if anything the historically African-American and Bahamian neighborhoods are getting pushed out for new development and higher-paying residents, and the handful of Asian families who can be found down here still seem to have to go it alone because not a lot of new people have found reason to move down. The Keys, and particularly Key West, do attract an openly LGBT population, but it still leans toward male and white, and still probably averages at about 40 yrs old.

All of this is sort of ironic, because the people who live in and move to the Keys are very open and accepting of people of all sexual orietations, skin tones, cultures, and ages. Nobody here really cares who you are or what you do, or how much you make, as long as you're friendly and respectful of others. And the wealthy white older people who come here feel the same way. But, not many other groups can afford to stay here, nor do they feel as much draw to the lifestyle here for various reasons - a primary one being isolation. The younger people who come with no savings, no skills, and no plan do attempt to move permanently, but most hike their way right back out within the year defeated, so that population is really transient.

People known as "Conchs," who were born in Monroe County, FL, and many of whom have had family living here for generations, can generally no longer afford to live here and are being forced out in growing numbers to look for both substantive employment, and affordable housing.

So the Keys really welcome all types of people to come down and add to the diversity here, but to make it work you do need a plan beforehand, and a source of income already lined up! A roommate or two is also highly recommended, even for adults of any age.

I would also add that the tourists still come here in droves, and THEY are very diverse. Their diversity also seems to be increasing a lot over the past decade. I do see families and individuals of all ages who are clearly on vacation, and these people are of every skin tone and background, openly of various sexual orientations, and appear to be from various economic situations - some can easily afford frequent visits, and some have saved up for a lifetime to be here for a week. Oddly enough, the Upper Keys has so little affordable housing that stores here frequently hire people who drive in from Homestead for the minimum wage jobs - and so these workers are often West Indian or African-American or sometimes Haitian, and they are part of the daily experience of the Keys of buying groceries or whatever, although they don't actually stay here overnight. So for those who decide to move permanently here, it's not like you will be the only Indian, lesbian, African-American, 19 yr old, or whatever here - not at all! It's just that there aren't that many diverse people, especially non-white, who can afford to live here as residents year-round.

For those who visit they won't realize the difference, their experience of the Keys will look rather diverse because everywhere they go they will see different kinds of people - in stores, hotels, restaurants, and also out on the water. But the locals can tell who is local, and that group is less diverse.


So both the type of tourists, and the type of residents, is currently changing in the Keys. The tourists are becoming more diverse, but because the cost of living here is going up so much, the residents are becoming less diverse. They balance each other out so to visit down here, it might look outwardly the same as ever, but it's actually a major shift.

[* I would add, there are a handful of neighborhoods that have increasing non-white Latino/Hispanic families who seem to have hit the middle class in Miami and have moved down from there. It is the only possible sector of growing middle class in Monroe County. But it is fairly recent, and due to the changes in flood costs and building regulations I'm not sure if it will last or not. These families speak predominantly Spanish at home, and I do not know what types of employment they have - their ability to stay, or to keep growing, will depend on how steady that employment is to keep up with the rising costs of home ownership here. I didn't think of this before because it's still a fairly small population - these families bought during the recent economic crash.]

Last edited by StarfishKey; 04-04-2015 at 07:24 AM..
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Old 04-04-2015, 08:29 AM
 
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The population of the entire state is definitely skewing more moderate and Hispanic. Look at the recent elections and polls on issues like gay marriage and marijuana
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Old 04-04-2015, 10:45 AM
 
Location: FLORIDA
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Agreed^
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Old 04-04-2015, 10:49 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chopchop0 View Post
The population of the entire state is definitely skewing more moderate and Hispanic. Look at the recent elections and polls on issues like gay marriage and marijuana
That's great, but FL was still like one of the most recent states to finally legalize same-sex marriage.... Meaning, we still have tons of people that dont want same sex marriage and have an administration in office that is not pro-marriage equality or pro-marijuana legalization, so idk.... but that doesn't seem all that "moderate" to me.... the medical marijuana bill didn't even pass...

How moderate of Florida, wow. lol jk

As for Miami...
I dont really think the demographics are actually changing, but the population is growing.. So Miami still remains Hispanic in culture and feel through and through.
The population is growing, traffic is increasing, construction coontinues, so more people are moving here... of course the super rich from south America and... and immigrants from the caribbean... and northeasterners looking to escape the cold winters.... Those demographics aren't changing anytime soon.

I imagine the rest of Florida is going to way that Miami already is.
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Old 04-04-2015, 11:31 AM
 
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Orlando/Orange County is becoming rapidly very Hispanic and has the second largest Puerto Rican population in the US behind New York City. As of the last census 1/3 of Orange County's population is Hispanic and by 2040 is forecasted to be closer to 50%, with neighboring Osceola County just to the south already hovering at that number in 2015.
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Old 04-04-2015, 04:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
West Sanford is seeing a lot of younger singles/couples and families move in for the favorable location as well as the schools. Lake Mary is pretty much built out so the only room left to take advantage of all of the amenities is here in on the west side of Sanford. The area is becoming wealthier with a 20% increase forecasted by 2018. In terms of improvements I would hope to see some kind of constraint over development so it doesn't become another Altamonte Springs.
Interesting observations and I would expect Sanford is seeing a lot of growth in families because of the schools.
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Old 04-04-2015, 04:09 PM
 
1,897 posts, read 2,147,400 times
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Originally Posted by OptimusPrime69 View Post
That's great, but FL was still like one of the most recent states to finally legalize same-sex marriage.... Meaning, we still have tons of people that dont want same sex marriage and have an administration in office that is not pro-marriage equality or pro-marijuana legalization, so idk.... but that doesn't seem all that "moderate" to me.... the medical marijuana bill didn't even pass...

How moderate of Florida, wow. lol jk

As for Miami...
I dont really think the demographics are actually changing, but the population is growing.. So Miami still remains Hispanic in culture and feel through and through.
The population is growing, traffic is increasing, construction coontinues, so more people are moving here... of course the super rich from south America and... and immigrants from the caribbean... and northeasterners looking to escape the cold winters.... Those demographics aren't changing anytime soon.

I imagine the rest of Florida is going to way that Miami already is.
Yes that seems to be that case but according to article I read it seems like a lot of Hispanics are moving from Miami to the suburbs or out of the county as a forecast actually has their population decreasing.
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Old 04-04-2015, 04:13 PM
 
1,897 posts, read 2,147,400 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chopchop0 View Post
The population of the entire state is definitely skewing more moderate and Hispanic. Look at the recent elections and polls on issues like gay marriage and marijuana
I very well agree with that but I would say our legislature is not representative of the changing demographics because only half the population is actually voting. Florida is almost considered a majority minority state as time passes on experts expect to be a reality.
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