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Old 05-08-2015, 04:17 PM
 
1,897 posts, read 2,147,400 times
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All the Florida haters responded in this thread no true well rounded input only people who agree with each other its actually kind of sad that no one fact checks these people posting.
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Old 05-09-2015, 10:10 AM
 
Location: OCNJ and or lower Florida keys
772 posts, read 1,631,700 times
Reputation: 787
Quote:
Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
So net-net what that says is that you're in a high-risk flood zone in the Keys and were in a low-risk zone in NJ. A modular home has next to zero ability to survive a Cat 2+ so the risk is a lot higher in a windstorm, which doesn't factor in as a risk in NJ.

Momma_bear's comparison was more like for like.
this particular modular home has withstood every hurricane from CAT 1 to CAT 4 to hit the lower keys from 1967 to the present day. not just my house but all of the keys are in a high risk flood zone. The Florida modular home would withstand a hurricane way better than my stick built NJ home. the construction as compared to the NJ home with no hurricane strapping or bracing is far superior. The Florida house was built with over three hundred hurricane straps. All sort of wind resistance measures taken into consideration before it was even built like the low slope roof and reinforced foundation. there are foundation hurricane straps to the reinforced block foundation. plus floor joist, roof rafter and wall hurricane straps every 16 inches plus every additional foundation pier has two heavy duty metal straps also holding the structure in place during a hurricane.
I have done extensive work replumbing and rewiring my 1983 built NJ home and have yet to find one hurricane strap.
If both homes were located next to one another in the Florida keys, given the choice to stay in my NJ home or the Florida home during a CAT 3 hurricane I would choose the the modular home without a moments hesitation. I would actually be amazed if the NJ house did not at least lose its roof. 8 out of the 10 insurers i called to insure my NJ home would not even give me a quote because my NJ house is within 2 miles of the coast. this puts it it is in a high risk tidal flood zone according to the companies like liberty mutual. That was the reason i was given as to why they don't insure any home within two miles of tidal water.
The only company that will insure my Florida home for windstorm is Citizens which is a state backed insurer of last resort. besides the high risk flood zone that's also why the policy is so high they are making up for past losses and expected future losses.
Windstorm is always the biggest factor in any hurricane! A hurricane like NJ's 2012's sandy was a windstorm! do you think the ocean just rises up and floods the high risk areas due to the gravitational pull of the moon. you do realize its the 100 plus mile hour winds blowing from the hurricane that causes the flooding. If every modular home was not able to survive a CAT 2 hurricane then 40% of the homes in the keys would not exist. 40% of all new residential constructive in the keys in the last 30 years were modular homes. think about this for a minute, when is the last time you saw a built on site home picked up and moved down the highway at 55 mph and then set on a new concrete foundation
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Old 05-09-2015, 10:25 AM
 
11,636 posts, read 20,430,045 times
Reputation: 12160
Quote:
Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
So net-net what that says is that you're in a high-risk flood zone in the Keys and were in a low-risk zone in NJ. A modular home has next to zero ability to survive a Cat 2+ so the risk is a lot higher in a windstorm, which doesn't factor in as a risk in NJ.

Momma_bear's comparison was more like for like.
The thing is that I live inland and rates are not significantly less inland than they are directly on the coast.
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Old 05-09-2015, 10:27 AM
 
11,636 posts, read 20,430,045 times
Reputation: 12160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fl1150 View Post
All the Florida haters responded in this thread no true well rounded input only people who agree with each other its actually kind of sad that no one fact checks these people posting.
How is it hating to state facts? I love living in FL but my husband is in a profession where he can earn the same amount of money here as he did up north.
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Old 05-09-2015, 03:28 PM
 
6,250 posts, read 3,445,382 times
Reputation: 5673
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigh110 View Post
this particular modular home has withstood every hurricane from CAT 1 to CAT 4 to hit the lower keys from 1967 to the present day. not just my house but all of the keys are in a high risk flood zone. The Florida modular home would withstand a hurricane way better than my stick built NJ home. the construction as compared to the NJ home with no hurricane strapping or bracing is far superior. The Florida house was built with over three hundred hurricane straps. All sort of wind resistance measures taken into consideration before it was even built like the low slope roof and reinforced foundation. there are foundation hurricane straps to the reinforced block foundation. plus floor joist, roof rafter and wall hurricane straps every 16 inches plus every additional foundation pier has two heavy duty metal straps also holding the structure in place during a hurricane.
I have done extensive work replumbing and rewiring my 1983 built NJ home and have yet to find one hurricane strap.
If both homes were located next to one another in the Florida keys, given the choice to stay in my NJ home or the Florida home during a CAT 3 hurricane I would choose the the modular home without a moments hesitation. I would actually be amazed if the NJ house did not at least lose its roof. 8 out of the 10 insurers i called to insure my NJ home would not even give me a quote because my NJ house is within 2 miles of the coast. this puts it it is in a high risk tidal flood zone according to the companies like liberty mutual. That was the reason i was given as to why they don't insure any home within two miles of tidal water.
The only company that will insure my Florida home for windstorm is Citizens which is a state backed insurer of last resort. besides the high risk flood zone that's also why the policy is so high they are making up for past losses and expected future losses.
Windstorm is always the biggest factor in any hurricane! A hurricane like NJ's 2012's sandy was a windstorm! do you think the ocean just rises up and floods the high risk areas due to the gravitational pull of the moon. you do realize its the 100 plus mile hour winds blowing from the hurricane that causes the flooding. If every modular home was not able to survive a CAT 2 hurricane then 40% of the homes in the keys would not exist. 40% of all new residential constructive in the keys in the last 30 years were modular homes. think about this for a minute, when is the last time you saw a built on site home picked up and moved down the highway at 55 mph and then set on a new concrete foundation
The issue is less about your NJ home's construction or lack of wind mitigation but the fact that your NJ home is a lot less likely to get hit by a hurricane.

Another way to look at it - how much would the risk people figure your NJ home could be affected by winter storm damage (snow, freezing pipes) vs. your home in the Keys?
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Old 05-09-2015, 07:51 PM
 
1,897 posts, read 2,147,400 times
Reputation: 1016
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momma_bear View Post
How is it hating to state facts? I love living in FL but my husband is in a profession where he can earn the same amount of money here as he did up north.
Well you can't give a well rounded opinion if you haven't lived here since 2007 now can you ? I'm not referring to you but someone else posting in this thread.
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Old 05-10-2015, 11:50 AM
 
Location: OCNJ and or lower Florida keys
772 posts, read 1,631,700 times
Reputation: 787
Quote:
Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
The issue is less about your NJ home's construction or lack of wind mitigation but the fact that your NJ home is a lot less likely to get hit by a hurricane.

Another way to look at it - how much would the risk people figure your NJ home could be affected by winter storm damage (snow, freezing pipes) vs. your home in the Keys?
the issue was about the economics of the cost of living in south Florida. The OP said it seems cheap I tend to partially disagree with that statement and was stating my rational for that belief. for instance to compare apples to apples the cost of homeowners insurance is much higher in Florida even with wind mitigation. and you are correct that is how it should be due to the frequency of hurricanes. for example: take two houses built in the same year according to local building codes. Both within 2 miles of tidal water. one is built in NJ the other in FL. the house built in NJ will always be significantly less to insure for hurricane and flood than the one in FL.
this is just one of the reasons why I feel the cost of south FL is more expensive compared to southern NJ. This in my opinion makes south Florida a tad bit more expensive and it not seemingly cheap. that was the point I was trying to get across. I also know from multiple shopping/buying experiences for gas and going to the supermarket and buying food that the costs also cheaper for me in South Jersey. I am specifically comparing the Marmora, NJ Shoprite and Wawa gas station to the Marathon, FL Publix and Tom Thumb gas station. My two 2004 vehicles with full coverage in south jersey $1456. when I was contemplating making Florida my home base I was quoted $2400 for full coverage on my vehicles insurance. I pay a higher rate for electricity, and H2O in Florida.
Specifically in my case I find South Jersey to be cheaper to live right now. if I had to pay the top state tax rate of 8.9% i would be singing a different tune. Maybe living way inland in Florida is cheaper I don't know because I don't live or shop inland Florida. Just my personal experience spending lots of time in both NJ and FL. If money wasn't a factor I would choose to live in Florida over NJ. at least my taxes in Florida are $1200 cheaper but my FL house is 1300 sq ft less living space too.
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Old 05-10-2015, 02:13 PM
 
6,250 posts, read 3,445,382 times
Reputation: 5673
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigh110 View Post
the issue was about the economics of the cost of living in south Florida. The OP said it seems cheap I tend to partially disagree with that statement and was stating my rational for that belief. for instance to compare apples to apples the cost of homeowners insurance is much higher in Florida even with wind mitigation. and you are correct that is how it should be due to the frequency of hurricanes. for example: take two houses built in the same year according to local building codes. Both within 2 miles of tidal water. one is built in NJ the other in FL. the house built in NJ will always be significantly less to insure for hurricane and flood than the one in FL.
this is just one of the reasons why I feel the cost of south FL is more expensive compared to southern NJ. This in my opinion makes south Florida a tad bit more expensive and it not seemingly cheap. that was the point I was trying to get across. I also know from multiple shopping/buying experiences for gas and going to the supermarket and buying food that the costs also cheaper for me in South Jersey. I am specifically comparing the Marmora, NJ Shoprite and Wawa gas station to the Marathon, FL Publix and Tom Thumb gas station. My two 2004 vehicles with full coverage in south jersey $1456. when I was contemplating making Florida my home base I was quoted $2400 for full coverage on my vehicles insurance. I pay a higher rate for electricity, and H2O in Florida.
Specifically in my case I find South Jersey to be cheaper to live right now. if I had to pay the top state tax rate of 8.9% i would be singing a different tune. Maybe living way inland in Florida is cheaper I don't know because I don't live or shop inland Florida. Just my personal experience spending lots of time in both NJ and FL. If money wasn't a factor I would choose to live in Florida over NJ. at least my taxes in Florida are $1200 cheaper but my FL house is 1300 sq ft less living space too.
When it comes to gas for the car I agree totally that NJ is cheaper. FL gas tax is only a bit less than NY. So while I can't compare FL to NJ I can say that compared to where I lived in NY I save 7-8% income tax, close to 3% sales tax, 50% for car insurance, 50% for electric rates (although the actual bill isn't that much different - but I don't have to pay for heat). Water is more expensive in FL, I have to pay sewer instead of having a "free" cesspool, and my property taxes are less, but not by a huge amount.
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Old 05-13-2015, 08:28 AM
 
66 posts, read 176,982 times
Reputation: 32
Default Reply to: Cost of living in SE Florida

Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
How come people always tell me that the cost of living in southeast FL is high? I mean, when I look at the statistics for home values, they are around $180K-200K in ALL three counties (Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach). The only thing I can think of is that maybe the statistic is dragged down because the majority of homes are located in undesirable areas? I don't know.

But I currently live in Fairfield County, CT, which is EXTREMELY expensive. So to me, South Florida seems like a bargain!!! Am I wrong?

I would want a nice home in a nice, quiet area (not a fixer upper) for under $250K, if possible. But it's impossible around here.
:::::::::::::::::::::::::

From what I see - It's not as expensive as other states if your retired, but if you work, incomes tend to be less, therefore it's more expensive to live.
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Old 05-15-2015, 08:09 PM
 
163 posts, read 107,591 times
Reputation: 183
Default On point

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigh110 View Post
the issue was about the economics of the cost of living in south Florida. The OP said it seems cheap I tend to partially disagree with that statement and was stating my rational for that belief. for instance to compare apples to apples the cost of homeowners insurance is much higher in Florida even with wind mitigation. and you are correct that is how it should be due to the frequency of hurricanes. for example: take two houses built in the same year according to local building codes. Both within 2 miles of tidal water. one is built in NJ the other in FL. the house built in NJ will always be significantly less to insure for hurricane and flood than the one in FL.
this is just one of the reasons why I feel the cost of south FL is more expensive compared to southern NJ. This in my opinion makes south Florida a tad bit more expensive and it not seemingly cheap. that was the point I was trying to get across. I also know from multiple shopping/buying experiences for gas and going to the supermarket and buying food that the costs also cheaper for me in South Jersey. I am specifically comparing the Marmora, NJ Shoprite and Wawa gas station to the Marathon, FL Publix and Tom Thumb gas station. My two 2004 vehicles with full coverage in south jersey $1456. when I was contemplating making Florida my home base I was quoted $2400 for full coverage on my vehicles insurance. I pay a higher rate for electricity, and H2O in Florida.
Specifically in my case I find South Jersey to be cheaper to live right now. if I had to pay the top state tax rate of 8.9% i would be singing a different tune. Maybe living way inland in Florida is cheaper I don't know because I don't live or shop inland Florida. Just my personal experience spending lots of time in both NJ and FL. If money wasn't a factor I would choose to live in Florida over NJ. at least my taxes in Florida are $1200 cheaper but my FL house is 1300 sq ft less living space too.

Bigh110 hit it perfectly....if I could do it all over again I would go back in time and stay in NY. Florida is a nicer environment, but you better have a $100,000 job lined up or you won't be able to a afford it
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