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Old 05-12-2015, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
7,681 posts, read 16,103,744 times
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There have been a series of changes to mobile home building codes (aka 'HUD code') over the years. 1970s manufactured homes are pretty much junk, but the code version that came about after Hurricane Andrew resulted in homes that are really quite good at handling high winds, (Homes to be located in Zone 3 ie. much of Florida have to meet a 110 mph wind code.) especially if they are tied down to code requirements and their owners didn't attach sun porches or carports to them.

One interesting study here:

http://www.huduser.org/portal/Public...eCharley04.pdf

Unfortunately, it will take a long while for the rest of the pre-1994 structure code mobile homes to be removed from use in the state so the problems with that housing stock in high winds will continue.
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Old 05-12-2015, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Fort Liquordale, Florida
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In my opinion the majority of people living in mobile homes are cheap, transients, here-today-gone-tomorrow types, miserly, etc.
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Old 05-14-2015, 12:00 AM
 
Location: Somewhere
8,071 posts, read 5,395,340 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StreetSmarts View Post
it seems like there are less and less mobile home parks throughout the South. I dont see too many anymore.
There's less but there's still quite a lot.

I have seen them in the places the OP stated Homestead, North Fort Myers. There a lot of wood homes too and a lot of homes have older roofs that need to be replaced. The next time we get another cat 5 hurricane it will be devastating whether it hits the East or West Coast.
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Old 05-16-2015, 06:56 AM
 
10,604 posts, read 14,202,393 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ebn78 View Post
In my opinion the majority of people living in mobile homes are cheap, transients, here-today-gone-tomorrow types, miserly, etc.
So you obviously don't know any because there are communities in Indian River County that are long long term retiree residents.

And no they are not all CHEAP. And they have HOAs. And if you are age restricted 55+ there are STATE LAWS determining the residents qualifications and you cannot have more than 20% out of compliance.

Heck the LOT rent can be the price of an apartment's rent. Like $700-$800.

You can buy many condos here in Indian River county cheaper than some of these mobile homes and nice condos not junk. Even with golf.

Fairlane Harbor has a million dollar view on the Intracoastal. With personal docks and manatees swimming up to your door.

VBFairlane's Library | Photobucket

They range from 30K to 100K.

So I wouldn't generalize.

ETA: There are also mobile homes/parks here that have been here for decades, throughout hurricanes and the accompanying tornadoes. It was not FUN but they are still standing. There are 1970's year homes right now selling for in the $30Ks.People do upkeep on them like any OTHER house. New roofs, new siding, new windows, elec, plumbing, cabinets.

They just don't sit there rotting with crack heads renting for goodness sakes.

Last edited by runswithscissors; 05-16-2015 at 07:31 AM..
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Old 05-17-2015, 05:32 AM
 
1,897 posts, read 2,149,642 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sugah Ray View Post
There's less but there's still quite a lot.

I have seen them in the places the OP stated Homestead, North Fort Myers. There a lot of wood homes too and a lot of homes have older roofs that need to be replaced. The next time we get another cat 5 hurricane it will be devastating whether it hits the East or West Coast.
Developers will be getting there hands on them before any major hurricane happens IMO but who knows. Since land is getting so expensive down there they look for opportunities to redevelop areas with mobile home parks.
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Old 05-17-2015, 06:52 PM
 
17,571 posts, read 10,625,168 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by explorerman1 View Post
I would imagine, since Florida sits in a hurricane zone, that people would build much sturdier fixed foundation homes instead of flimsy mobile homes. I have been studying about hurricanes for a long time, and from what I have studied, mobile homes are totally not built or designed to resist hurricane winds; in fact, an unanchored single wide mobile home can tip over in winds as low as 70 miles per hour; even 55 to 60 mile per hour winds, if there isn't a lot of furniture in the mobile home, can potentially cause the mobile home to tip or lean sideways. At around 90 to 100 miles per hour, anchored mobile homes start peeling apart at the seams.

Now I have also seen what the kinds of winds that might only tear some tiles off the roof of a concrete block structure, or CBS, house, can do to mobile homes. For instance, right after Hurricane Andrew tore through southern Miami-Dade County, there were areas of reinforced CBS houses that lost only some shingles/tiles off the roof and maybe even a few windows next to mobile home parks that were just totally ripped to shreds by Andrew's violent winds. Same thing apparently occured during Hurricane Charley in the Port Charlotte area. Even Hurricane Frances, producing maximum winds of only around 105 miles per hour upon landfall in Florida, did some rather heavy structural damage to numerous mobile homes, especially in and near Fort Pierce.

Additionally, according to my Hurricane Survival Guide, homes of wood frame construction are not a whole lot better than mobile homes. Especially when they have gable end roofs. In case you didn't know, a gable end roof is that type of roof that normally slopes in two directions and, at each end, overhangs a triangular wall. According to my survival guide, a gable end "catches wind like a sail." Numerous wood frame homes in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew were missing roofs and oftentimes even entire top floors, ground floors of those same houses were often littered with fallen ceilings and wreckage from the second floors.

But apparently, according to Google Satellite View, mobile home parks still exist in Florida, even including in Homestead and Florida City, which were directly hit by Hurricane Andrew. And just roughly 4 miles north of me are literally tons and tons of mobile home parks! I also noticed a few mobile home parks in Punta Gorda, which took a direct hit by Hurricane Charley in 2004.

Why exactly do people still put mobile home parks in hurricane regions such as Florida? Also, why do people still put gable end roofs on new residential buildings in hurricane zones?
I suspect you will find minimal mobile/modular homes have been damaged in hurricanes. In fact many modular or manufactured homes are built just like regular homes and when tied down properly do just fine. In driving through several areas hit by hurricanes and tornadoes the regular homes saw equal damage. Now older mobile homes are at greater risks, but my father in law lived in one built in the1970's and in Ft Meyers and the park never had a problem.

Plus they are cheaper to replace than a damaged house.
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Old 05-18-2015, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Seminole County, FL
9,640 posts, read 6,616,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by expatCA View Post
I suspect you will find minimal mobile/modular homes have been damaged in hurricanes. In fact many modular or manufactured homes are built just like regular homes and when tied down properly do just fine. In driving through several areas hit by hurricanes and tornadoes the regular homes saw equal damage. Now older mobile homes are at greater risks, but my father in law lived in one built in the1970's and in Ft Meyers and the park never had a problem.

Plus they are cheaper to replace than a damaged house.
This.
I've seen many VERY nice and quaint mobile/modular home parks, especially developed with old retirees/snowbirds in mind. Not everyone wants to live in a 2000+ sqft 4bd/2bt house. Retirees tend to like to have a small, cozy home that's affordable and has a sense of community with neighbors. Apartments don't work as well, as there is no yard our outdoor area around the home.

Newer mobile/modulars have strict standards that make them relatively safe in hurricanes.
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Old 05-18-2015, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Port Charlotte
3,926 posts, read 4,779,422 times
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Two types of MH parks here: developer/investor owned and owner owned. On the investor owned, you buy the home, often in a 55+ development, then have to pay the $700 or so a month for rent and HOA. You have no control over the HOA as it is controlled by the owner, you have no control over rent increases, and the land can be sold out from under you. That being said, you can buy one for less than a decent used car.

In an owner owned development, you buy the lot as well, and the HOA is controlled by the property owners. HOA dues are much less, in the $150 range. The project won't be sold out from under you. However, you will pay much more as you are buying both the lot and home.

If you are buying on the east coast or up along the panhandle close to the coast, not a good idea due to hurricanes. On the west coast or inland, not a biggie due to much less high winds compared to the eastern coast. We have homes that were built in the 50's that have been remodeled and are still functional and sellable.
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Old 05-19-2015, 08:20 AM
 
130 posts, read 188,579 times
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We are snowbirds with a mobile home in a beautiful senior park on the Gulf Coast...We spend October through April there and then the rest of the year in our home in Wisconsin...Our Florida park has about 75% snowbirds and many of our residents are quite well off but find that a mobile suits their needs for the winter season perfectly...The poor do not own lake homes in Wisconsin and Michigan...The mobiles in our park are very well kept up with people making regular improvements...Out of the 200+ homes it is very unusual for there to be more than 2 for sale at any one time, they sell fast...Of the 25% of our residents that remain all year they are generally the oldest and can't upkeep 2 homes and make the trek back and forth...

There also seems to be this perception that every other year most of the mobile homes in Florida get blown away...Our park has been in existence since 1978 and total hurricane/wind damage to date has been zero...Also please note that most of us are not even there during hurricane season...

So people can think what ever they like about mobile homes and the poor, down-trodden wretches that are forced to live there...Those of us that actually own them are enjoying this lifestyle very much...
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Old 05-19-2015, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Seminole County, FL
9,640 posts, read 6,616,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogerluli View Post
We are snowbirds with a mobile home in a beautiful senior park on the Gulf Coast...We spend October through April there and then the rest of the year in our home in Wisconsin...Our Florida park has about 75% snowbirds and many of our residents are quite well off but find that a mobile suits their needs for the winter season perfectly...The poor do not own lake homes in Wisconsin and Michigan...The mobiles in our park are very well kept up with people making regular improvements...Out of the 200+ homes it is very unusual for there to be more than 2 for sale at any one time, they sell fast...Of the 25% of our residents that remain all year they are generally the oldest and can't upkeep 2 homes and make the trek back and forth...

There also seems to be this perception that every other year most of the mobile homes in Florida get blown away...Our park has been in existence since 1978 and total hurricane/wind damage to date has been zero...Also please note that most of us are not even there during hurricane season...

So people can think what ever they like about mobile homes and the poor, down-trodden wretches that are forced to live there...Those of us that actually own them are enjoying this lifestyle very much...
I think most who make assumptions of mobile parks have simply never actually taken a good look at them.
Most that I see look like nice cozy homes, the lots have beautiful manicured lawns, the tenants keep beautiful gardens, and there seems to be a great sense of community.

Heck, the one behind my cul-de-sac always has gentlemen gathering outside one's back "porch" to fire up the smoker on weekends. Looks like a nice bunch of old folks if you ask me.

Meanwhile, my "nice" neighborhood with "nice" houses has had about 1/2 the houses turn into rentals, and as such, people keep moving in and out, including some rather strange enigmas from time to time.
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