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Old 05-11-2015, 07:39 AM
 
1,448 posts, read 2,155,795 times
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This is an Associated Press story that is running in papers all over the nation.


ST. AUGUSTINE — America's oldest city is slowly drowning.

Here are a few excerpts. The article is much longer:

"St. Augustine is one of many chronically flooded communities along Florida's 1,200-mile coastline, and officials in these diverse places share a common concern: They're afraid their buildings and economies will be further inundated by rising seas in just a couple of decades. The effects are a daily reality in much of Florida. Drinking water wells are fouled by seawater. Higher tides and storm surges make for more frequent road flooding from Jacksonville to Key West, and they're overburdening aging flood-control systems.
But the state has yet to offer a clear plan or coordination to address what local officials across Florida's coast see as a slow-moving emergency. Republican Gov. Rick Scott is skeptical of manmade climate change and has put aside the task of preparing for sea level rise, an Associated Press review of thousands of emails and documents pertaining to the state's preparations for rising seas found.
Despite warnings from water experts and climate scientists about risks to cities and drinking water, skepticism over sea-level projections and climate-change science has hampered planning efforts at all levels of government, the records showed. Florida's environmental agencies under Scott have been downsized and retooled, making them less effective at coordinating sea-level-rise planning in the state, the documents showed."...

"...The issue presents a public works challenge that could cost billions here and nationwide. In the third-most populous U.S. state, where most residents live near a coast, municipalities say they need statewide coordination and aid to prepare for the costly road ahead. "...

"If one city builds a seawall, it might divert water to a neighbor. Cities also lack the technology, money and manpower to keep back the seas by themselves.
In a brief interview with the AP in March, Scott... said cities and counties should contact environmental and water agencies to find answers — though Scott and a GOP-led Legislature have slashed billions in funding from those agencies."...

"St. Augustine's civil engineer says that the low-lying village will probably need a New Orleans-style pumping system to keep water out — but that but no one knows exactly what to do and the state's been unhelpful. "Only when the frequency of flooding increases will people get nervous about it, and by then it will be too late," engineer Reuben Franklin said."...

"Across coastal Florida, sea levels are rising faster than previously measured, according to federal estimates. In addition to more flooding at high tide, increasing sea levels also mean higher surges during tropical storms and hurricanes, and more inundation of drinking wells throughout Florida.
Water quality is a big concern for many communities. It's especially bad in South Florida — just north of Miami, Hallandale Beach has abandoned six of eight drinking water wells because of saltwater intrusion. Wells in northeast and Central Florida are deemed at risk, too."...

"While South Florida water officials have led the charge in addressing sea level rise concerns in their area, their attempt to organize a statewide plan was met with indifference, documents show."

..."The list of other problems across the state is growing. Miami Beach is spending $400 million on new stormwater pumps to keep seawater from overwhelming an outdated sewer system.
In St. Augustine, homes built on sand dunes teeter over open space as erosion eats at the foundations. Beachside hotel owners worry about their livelihoods.
Tampa and Miami are particularly vulnerable to rising seas — many roads and bridges weren't designed to handle higher tides, according to the National Climate Change Assessment. Officials say Daytona Beach roads, too, flood more often than in the 1990s."

..."South Miami passed a resolution calling for South Florida to secede from the more conservative northern half of the state so it could deal with climate change itself. Insurance giant Swiss Re has estimated that the economy in southeast Florida could sustain $33 billion in damage from rising seas and other climate-related damage in 2030, according to the Miami-Dade Sea Level Rise Task Force."

"Most towns say they cannot afford the cost of climate-change studies or regional coordination.
"For us, it's a reality, it's not a political issue," said Courtney Barker, city manager of Satellite Beach. The town near Cape Canaveral used to flood during tropical weather, but now just a heavy rainstorm can make roads impassable for commuters.
"When you have to listen to that mantra, 'Climate change, is it real or not?' you kind of chuckle, because you see it," Barker said.


To read the full article: Sea rise threatens Florida coast, but there's no statewide plan to deal with it | Tampa Bay Times
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Old 05-11-2015, 09:49 AM
 
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well, it's hard to address when you're not even allowed to officially mention "climate change" in state government docs.
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Old 05-11-2015, 10:31 AM
 
Location: South Florida
4,818 posts, read 5,375,179 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OptimusPrime69 View Post
well, it's hard to address when you're not even allowed to officially mention "climate change" in state government docs.
My thoughts exactly!
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Old 05-11-2015, 11:21 AM
 
2,932 posts, read 4,017,744 times
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While I believe in global warming and I truly believe the environment should be protected as much as humanly possible, I don't see the plausibility of controlling the ocean or the weather. There's so many places in Florida, and for that matter, the rest of the world, that shouldn't be inhabited.
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Old 05-11-2015, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Spring Hill Florida
12,135 posts, read 13,262,027 times
Reputation: 6010
Ocean front property in Orlando.
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:30 PM
 
26,590 posts, read 54,620,883 times
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They better not try to raise my taxes or surcharge my insurance to pay for repairs to the homes of millionaires with beach front property. We bought inland and 240 feet above sea level for a reason... Unfortunately you can't buy common sense.
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Old 05-14-2015, 03:08 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,766 posts, read 7,047,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
They better not try to raise my taxes or surcharge my insurance to pay for repairs to the homes of millionaires with beach front property. We bought inland and 240 feet above sea level for a reason... Unfortunately you can't buy common sense.
Eh, another liberal "scare" article passing off conjecture, speculation and spin as "fact" in regards to their "global warming", er......"climate change" agenda. They're counting on folks not being able to see through their claims, or being intimidated by their heavy handed attacks on those who have the nerve to point out the inconsistencies or the ridiculous in their claims.

I wouldn't worry about it.
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Old 05-14-2015, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Port Charlotte
3,927 posts, read 4,785,216 times
Reputation: 3409
Rate of rise is and has been 1.3mm per year. Started back after the last Ice Age. No documented increase in rise. Guess what. You live on the edge of the sea, you stand the chance of ending up in the sea.
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Old 05-14-2015, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Somewhere
8,071 posts, read 5,399,708 times
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I don't think we are not gonna drown any time soon but we may see more water restrictions because of salt water intrusion.
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Old 05-14-2015, 05:11 PM
 
6,374 posts, read 3,488,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Restrain View Post
Rate of rise is and has been 1.3mm per year. Started back after the last Ice Age. No documented increase in rise. Guess what. You live on the edge of the sea, you stand the chance of ending up in the sea.
So roughly half a foot by 2115. I won't lose sleep over it.
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